John Miller – in conversation about his historic photographs of the Māori Land March

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Photographer John Miller with one of his photographs of the Māori Land March when it arrived in Wellington on October 13 1975. John was photographed at Te Unga Waka Marae in Auckland, at the commemorations of the 40th anniversary of the March in September 2015. Credit: John Miller

Acclaimed documentary photographer John Miller (Ngāpuhi) has documented social and political dissent and cultural events for more than four decades.  John photographed the Wellington section of the 1975 Māori Land March; from Porirua to its arrival at Parliament grounds.  The photographs have become well-known following their reproduction in books, exhibitions and school resources. In this session, John will talk with Paul Diamond about his photographs of the Māori Land March, and his involvement with the march organisers, Te Roopu o te Matakite.

A Wellington City Libraries talk, organised in partnership with the National Library, as part of the Turnbull Gallery exhibition, ‘Not one more acre’: The Māori Land March 40 years on.

Supported by LIANZA Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui regional group.

When: 12.30-1.30pm, Wednesday 21 October
Where: Ground floor, Wellington Central Library
Cost: Free

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The Māori Land March on the Wellington motorway, October 13 1975.
Credit: John Miller

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina : a biography of Whina Cooper / Michael King.

Syndetics book coverRaupatu : the confiscation of Māori land / edited by Richard Boast and Richard S. Hill.

Not One More Acre: A Conversation with Ans Westra at the Central Library

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This October marks the 40th anniversary of the 1975 Māori Land March – when Dame Whina Cooper lead marchers to Parliament to protest the loss of Māori lands. “Not One More Acre of Māori Land” became the catch-cry of the marchers, who left Te Hāpua in the far north on 14 September as a group numbering no more than 50, and eventually reached Wellington on 13 October as a powerful hikoi numbering at over 5000.

Iconic photographer Ans Westra captured this event and on Tuesday 6 October Wellington Central Library will be hosting a talk with this renowned and well-loved photographer, who will describe her experience of attending and photographing the historic march. From Thursday 1st October there will also be an exhibition of contact sheet prints of Ans Westra’s photographs of the arrival of the march in Wellington on 13 October 1975.

A Conversation with Ans Westra
Tuesday 6 October at 12.30pm
2nd floor, Central Library

Syndetics book coverWashday at the pa / photographs by Ans Westra ; with text by Mark Amery.
Washday at the pa, by New Zealand premier photographers Ans Westra, was first published as a photo-story booklet in 1964 by the Department of Education for use in Primary Schools, but all 38,000 copies were withdrawn following a campaign by the Maori Women’s Welfare League that it would have a ‘detrimental effect’ on Maori people – and that the living conditions portrayed within the book were atypical. A second edition of the booklet was published the same years with some images omitted. This edition is a selection of these two editions together with photographs of the washday family taken in 1988, and includes essays by arts critic, journalist and broadcaster Mark Amery detailing the controversy and background of Washday at the pa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNga tau ki muri = Our future / Ans Westra.
“This timely and visionary new book includes 137 Westra photographs of the New Zealand landscape, with text contributions from Hone Tuwhare, Russel Norman, Brian Turner, David Eggleton and David Lange, who wrote a short piece for Ans as part of an unrealised book project in 1987. Well known for her iconic black and white documentation of Maori culture, Ans Westra is also known for her colour works, which show concern for New Zealand’s destiny, “an island exploited by various waves of settlement”. Shot with Ans’ trusty Rolleiflex camera, the sometimes damning images in Our Future have been made over the last 20 years. “The purpose of the book is to give a directive to the country, an awareness of things changed and lost within its short history. If we don’t plan for the long term and keep taking stop-gap measures, we leave very little behind. Instead of becoming like the rest of the world, this beautiful place should become a shining example of hope for survival in a newly balanced environment.” –Ans Westra.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina [videorecording] : mother of the nation.
“The autobiography of Maori land activist Dame Whina Cooper filmed two years before she died. Born in an earth-floor whare she became a teacher, gum digger, rugby coach, midwife, a tribal leader, president of Maori Women’s Welfare League and controversial leader of the Maori Land March. Who organized her first public protest at the age of 18.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHandboek : Ans Westra photographs / [exhibition curator and coordinator, Luit Bieringa ; texts, Cushla Parekowhai [et. al]].

Ans Westra [videorecording] : private journeys/public signposts / director, Luit Bieringa ; producer, Jan Bieringa.
New Zealand photographer, Ans Westra, talks about her career.

Librarian at Gallipoli – WW100 commemorations diary

Adrienne, our Children’s & Young Adult Services Coordinator, received a double pass to the WW100 commemorations in Turkey as part of the Government-run ballot system. Here’s her report from the events on Saturday 25 April which we received today:

“Was a bit of an ordeal, but totally worth it. We caught a bus at 2.30pm from Istanbul down to Gallipoli. The first check point was bus registration. We queued for 2 hours in a line of buses for this. The bus was given a number and we were all given tags with the same number- so we could ID our bus at the other end. The next check point was for the people on the bus. Another hour of queuing. bandsWe all had to show our ballot passes and passports and were each given a wrist band, different ones for Aussies and Kiwis. Next we queued, again, for the disembarkation point. We got off the bus and queued for security screening into a holding park where there was, finally, hot food and drinks and toilets. The first stop- the bus check point. We left through the opposite side of the park, onto shuttle buses, then down to ANZAC Cove for a final security screening (and another wrist band to say we’d been cleared) and then a short walk to the commemorative site.

We ended up getting there at 1.30am. The place seemed packed and only half the attendees were there at this stage. Eventually everyone had to stand for the last couple of hours to fit everyone in. There was an entertainment programme through the night with music, singing and documentaries.

crowd at dawn

As dawn approached the lights went off and everyone went quiet in anticipation of the ceremony starting. It was very moving occasion, much like the ceremonies at home but with the hills behind lit up to visually emphasise the feat achieved.

crowd-dawns

Adrienne’s videos:
Dawn Ceremony – Ode
Dawn Ceremony – part of Prince Charles’ speech

Prince Harry in the crowd
Prince Harry in the crowd
Prince Charles laying a wreath
Prince Charles laying a wreath

Afterwards we were released from ANZAC Cove in stages to start the walk up to Lone Pine and Chunuk Bair. The Kiwis had lots of time as our ceremony wasn’t starting until 1.45pm and there was only 2000 of us to get into the site. So we had a leisurely walk through the battlefields and cemeteries, using the Nga Tapuwae app as a guide and seeking out the Kiwi points of interest.
Video: Walking: ANZAC Cove, Artillary Road

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Near Lone Pine. Turkish trenches just on other side of the road. The road is no-mans land where bodies piled up for weeks before a cease fire was agreed upon to collect and bury the dead.

While we spent time looking for the Kiwi and Wellington graves, the reality is that the brutality of the fighting means there were few bodies to bury and it was difficult to identify remains with precision. Most of the dead are named on memorials and interred in mass graves under our feet. Many others are still unaccounted for and the battle fields are open graveyards – we found some bones and pieces of skull underfoot as we wandered around, which was thought-provoking.

anzac-books anzac-covesThe location of this photo is the point where the book’s author, Lt Westmacott, got to with his soldiers before being wounded on 25th April and having to fall back. He’s one of the NZ heroes of ANZAC Day.

The NZ ceremony at Chunuk Bair was moving as it was especially significant for kiwis with waiata and speeches made with a focus on the kiwi efforts and achievements. Before and after the Chunuk Bair ceremony we were entertained by the NZ Youth Ambassadors singing kiwi classics with the crowd of 2000 heartily singing along to keep warm and awake (we were well into our second period of 24 hours with no sleep at this stage, but spirits were high).

Videos:
Chunuk Bair ceremony start
After Chunuk Bair ceremony

We then had to wait for our buses to collect us. They were going to Lone Pine first to pick up the Aussies from their ceremony before collecting us. The bus numbers were slowly being called out but with around 300 buses involved it was going to be a long wait. In the end we waited 5 hours for our bus to arrive, which gave us time the reflect on history and the day, and chat to fellows Kiwis. As it started to get cold the NZDF started handing out cups of hot tea and soup and kept everyone’s spirits up.

Our bus arrived at 8pm and whisked us off to a restaurant for a hot meal before the drive back to Istanbul. We arrived at 2am on Sunday 26th – 38 hours after leaving on the 24th and having been awake for 44 hours. We were exhausted but completely moved by what we had seen, learned and experienced. ”

Previous post in the series: Adrienne blogged about her library-related preparations to go to Turkey

Large scale ANZAC display at the Central Library

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For the past year, in the lead up to the Centenary of the Gallipoli landings, Wellington City librarians have been producing a series of contributions highlighting various aspects of our collection where you can find resources related to this major historical event. Our latest addition, inspired by a recent blog post http://bit.ly/1DNZ48J about Charlotte Le Gallais, one of the nurses who went to Gallipoli on the Maheno hospital ship, is a large scale exhibition about her story, highlighting the various online resources available for history and ancestry research. Come to the Central Library and discover her fascinating story.

You can also contribute your family stories in our “Scrapbook of Memories” kept by the display. For more resources on WW1, browse our series at www.wcl.govt.nz/ww100

 

Remembering WW1 on Anzac Day

On 25 April 1915, New Zealanders along with other Allied troops landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey, with the aim of taking the Dardanelles, and threatening the Ottoman capital, Constantinople (now Istanbul). At the end of the nine month campaign, about a third of the New Zealand soldiers taking part had been killed. Anzac Day commemorates all New Zealand soldiers killed in war, and also honours returned servicemen and women.  Here is some further reading:

Syndetics book coverShattered glory : the New Zealand experience at Gallipoli and the Western Front / Matthew Wright.
“The Gallipoli campaign of 1915 destroyed New Zealand’s fantasies of war as a glorious schoolboy adventure on behalf of a beloved Empire. The Western Front campaign that followed in 1916-18 gave shape to the emotional impact. it was a horror world of death and mud that destroyed the souls of the young men who fought in it. Together, these two campaigns shaped the lives of a generation of New Zealanders and have given a particular meaning to modern memory of war. In Shattered Glory, highly regarded historian Matthew Wright illuminates New Zealand’s human experience during these two First World War campaigns, exploring the darker side of New Zealand’s iconic symbols of national identity and explaining some of the realities behind the twenty-first century mythology.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverDevils on horses : in the words of the Anzacs in the Middle East 1916-19 / Terry Kinloch ; foreword by Dr Christopher Pugsley.
“Reunited with their horses in Egypt after the shattering experience of Gallipoli, the Anzac mounted riflemen and light horsemen were initially charged with the defence of the Suez Canal, then with the clearance of the Sinai peninsula, and finally with the destruction of the Turkish armies in Palestine and Syria.
At last they could pursue the style of warfare for which they had been trained: on horseback.
The First World War battlefields in the Middle East have long been overshadowed by those of Gallipoli and the Western Front. Yet the story of the mounted riflemen in Sinai and Palestine is a truly fascinating one. Using the soldiers’ original letters and diaries wherever possible, Kinloch vividly describes every battle and skirmish in the long campaign against the Turks: the crucial Battle of Romani, the defeats at Bir el Abd, Gaza and Amman, and the successes at Beersheba, Ayun Kara and elsewhere.” (Abridged from publisher’s description)

Syndetics book coverMapping the first world war : battlefields of the great conflict from above.
“Some one hundred years on from the Great War, Mapping The First World War provides a unique perspective on the ‘war to end all wars’. Over a hundred maps and charts show the broad sweep of events, from Germany’s 1914 war goals to the final positions of the troops. There are maps depicting movements and battles as well as related documents, such as those on levels of conscription and numbers of weapons.” (Abridged from publisher’s description)

Syndetics book coverPasschendaele : the anatomy of a tragedy / Andrew Macdonald.
“This extensively researched book tells the story of one of the darkest hours of Australia and New Zealand’s First World War military. With the forensic use of decades-old documents and soldier accounts, it unveils for the first time what really happened on the war-torn slopes of Passchendaele, why, and who was responsible for the deaths and injuries of thousands of soldiers in the black mud of Flanders. Macdonald explores the October battles of Third Ypres from the perspective of the generals who organised them to the soldiers in the field, drawing on a wide range of evidence held in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Britain and Germany. His book is far more than a simple narrative of battle and includes critical and comparative assessments of command, personality, training discipline, weapons, systems, tactics and the environment. It looks equally at the roles of infantry, artillery and engineering units, whether Australian, New Zealand, Canadian or British, and in so doing presents a meticulous, objective and compelling investigation from start to finish. Along the way it offers numerous unique insights that have, until now, been obscured by a nearly century-old fog of war. This book will reshape the understanding of one of the most infamous battles of the First World War.” (Publisher’s description)

Syndetics book coverThe other Anzacs : nurses at war 1914-1918 / Peter Rees.
“By the end of The Great War, forty-five Australian and New Zealand nurses had died on overseas service and over two hundred had been decorated. These were women who left for war on an adventure, but were soon confronted with remarkable challenges for which their civilian lives could never have prepared them.
They were there for the horrors of Gallipoli and they were there for the savagery the Western Front. Within twelve hours of the slaughter at Anzac Cove they had over 500 horrifically injured patients to tend on one crammed hospital ship, and scores of deaths on each of the harrowing days that followed. Every night was a nightmare. Their strength and humanity were remarkable.” (Abridged from publisher’s description)

Syndetics book coverArchduke Franz Ferdinand lives! : a world without World War I / Richard Ned Lebow.
“For Lebow (A Cultural Theory of International Relations), a professor of international political theory, the erasure of WWI from our historical timeline would have placed our world on a path quite different from the one we are on today. He expounds on the theory of counterfactuals to revisit and better understand our history. “What-ifs of this kind offer insights into the world in which we actually live,” Lebow claims, letting us “probe why and how it came about, how contingent it was, and how we should evaluate it.” He begins with the assassination of Franz Ferdinand and its aftershocks, detailing what could have happened in the fields of science, art, medicine, and politics had the archduke survived. Using historical and personal records, supported by known personality traits of notable period figures, Lebow fashions two possible worlds, one better and one worse, had WWI been avoided. His confidence is evident on every page; this work of alternative history reminds us of our own position in flow of events and tempts us to follow Lebow’s lead in fantasizing about the possibilities inherent in these very distinct worlds. Though we can’t escape the realities of our past, Lebow provides his readers with exciting alternatives to consider.” (Publisher Weekly)

Syndetics book coverGallipoli : the final battles and evacuation of Anzac / David W. Cameron.
“This book is the first book since Charles Bean’s Official history to provide a detailed narrative of the bloody and tragic battle for Hill 60, along with the other engagements that went on until the very last days at Anzac – viewed from both sides of the trenches. It also examines in detail the planning and execution of the evacuation of the troops from Anzac – the most successful part of the whole Gallipoli fiasco. David Cameron’s detailed research and use of firsthand accounts including letters, diaries, and interviews, enables him to convey the confusion of battle while also telling a good story with a powerful emotional impact” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverMeetings in no man’s land : Christmas 1914 and fraternization in the Great War / Marc Ferro … [et al.] ; translations by Helen McPhail.
“In the winter of 1914, after long months of marching, soldiers on both fronts began to dig trenches and the war became a battle of attrition in which ordinary men faced each other across the bombed mud of No Man’s Land. The enemy lines were often no more than a few yards away, the soldiers of both sides in equal desperation, surrounded by carnage and horror. Out of this hardship came a shared feeling which was demonstrated in the unofficial armistice of Christmas 1914, when German and English soldiers laid down their weapons for a blessed moment of peace, played football and swapped food.
In this book, four international experts look at the story of Christmas 1914 and the evidence that fraternization was far more common than previously accepted. Using new research, the book explores these brief moments of humanity on all fronts and throughout the conflict, and shows them to have been not only prevalent but also vital, long ignored, factor in the war. For the French, defending their home territory, fraternization was the last taboo and until now omitted from the record.
Meetings in No Man’s Land reveals a story of the Great War that has long been forgotten or lost in censored official reports or officer journals, and brings new light to the harrowing experience of the ordinary soldier’s life in the trenches.” (Publisher’s description)

Syndetics book coverThe Great War handbook [electronic resource] : a guide for family historians & students of the conflict / Geoff Bridger ; foreword by Cornelli Barnett.
“Geoff Bridger’s The Great War Handbook answers many of the basic questions newcomers ask when confronted by this enormous and challenging subject not only what happened and why, but what was the Great War like for ordinary soldiers who were caught up in it. He describes the conditions the soldiers endured, the deadly risks they ran, their daily routines and the small roles they played in the complex military machine they were part of. His comprehensive survey of every aspect of the soldier’s life, from recruitment and training, through the experience of battle and its appalling aftermath, is an essential guide for students, family historians, teachers and anyone who is eager to gain an all-round understanding of the nature of the conflict. His authoritative handbook gives a fascinating insight into the world of the Great War – it is a basic book that no student of the subject can afford to be without.” (Syndetics summary)

Community Languages Newsletter for April

Take a look at the most recent library arrivals, celebrating New Zealand and the life of Katherine Mansfield, browse through the latest DVDs, including the acclaimed documentary Blackfish, get inspiration from cooking and crafting ideas and if you are speaking Chinese enjoy some Chinese literature.

New Zealand

For many kiwis the big OE is a right of passage, it is almost a qualification and wouldn’t look out of place on a curriculum vitae. During the 19th and early 20th century many New Zealanders viewed Britain as home even though they had never been there. This has continued and London is usually the home base and trips to Europe aretaken as soon as enough money is earned. Arriving in the NZ Collection this month Flying Kiwis A History of the OE Jude Wilson provides a history of the Kiwi OE. Also new this month is a book by Kirsty Gunn about her experience of returning to Wellington and her time spent writing at Katherine Mansfield house. This got me thinking about how Mansfield was of course one of New Zealand’s most famous OE travellers. So I have also included some of the titles that Kirsty had in her bibliography as a celebration of Mansfield and of course the OE.

Syndetics book coverFlying Kiwis : a history of the OE / Jude Wilson.
“Leaving home to see the world is something that succeeding generations of young New Zealanders have done in ever-increasing numbers. The ‘overseas experience,’ or the ‘OE,’ has been the topic of countless individual travel accounts, and has provided subject matter for plays, films, and novels. Until now, there hasn’t been a history of the OE. Based on the oral accounts of several hundred travelers across all seven decades of the OE, this vibrant history shows how the OE has changed over time. Well illustrated with the ephemera of popular culture surrounding youth travel, Flying Kiwis traces the emergence of the OE, as well as the transport, media, and other networks that have supported it. Laced with humor and entertaining anecdotes, Flying Kiwis is an essential read for anyone who has arrived in a foreign city with only a few dollars and the address of a friend’s cousin.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverThorndon : Wellington and home : my Katherine Mansfield project / Kirsty Gunn.
“For London-based writer Kirsty Gunn, returning to the city of her birth to spend a winter in a tiny colonial cottage in Thorndon is an exciting opportunity to walk the very streets and hills that Katherine Mansfield left behind on her departure from New Zealand, but later longed to revisit. For Mansfield, Gunn writes, home was an instant ‘go-to’ zone for invention and narrative and characterisation and setting. For Gunn, home is now two places – Here and there the same place after all.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverKatherine Mansfield’s New Zealand / Vincent O’Sullivan.
“A stunning, fully illustrated guide to the country and times that shaped our greatest short story writer — a feast of images and relevant excerpts from Mansfield’s stories and journals. Katherine Mansfield was born in Wellington in 1888 and died in France in 1923, regarded as one of the finest short story writers of her time. Her country of birth, initially a source of frustration for her, in time came to influence her writing. From Kezia’s Karori journey in Prelude, to the landscape of The Woman at the Store, the images of colonial New Zealand are a distinctive and compelling part of Katherine Mansfield’s writing.” (abridged Syndetics Summary)

Syndetics book coverLost Gold : the 100-year search for the gold reef of Northwest Nelson / Paul Bensemann.
“As a young man in the mid-1970s, Paul Bensemann was told an archetypal ‘lost gold’ story by his neighbour, a tobacco farmer in the Motueka Valley on the edge of what is now Kahurangi National Park. The story concerned an old prospector who had found a huge exposed gold reef, shining in the sun, deep in the mountain wilderness of Northwest Nelson. Just before he died, the prospector drew a map, and to Paul’s amazement his neighbour then produced the old, tatty, hand-drawn map, which had been handed down to him from his father. Lost Gold follows the many twists and turns of this 105-year-old story, and tries to explain why the reef has never been rediscovered. But in the end, whether or not the reef exists is only part of the story, and perhaps the bigger treasure here is the real tale of men in pursuit of their own El Dorado.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s lost heritage : the stories behind our forgotten landmarks / Richard Wolfe.
“Features 20 notable structures which, for various reasons, no longer exist. Most of the buildings have been demolished in the name of urban development, creating controversy. Each building is discussed and illustrated including the circumstances of its demise. The selection includes: Ruapekapeka Pa in Northland (burned down deliberately), Admiralty House in Auckland (demolished to make way for new roads) Wellington’s Parliament Buildings (accidental fire) Invercargill’s Seacliff Asylum (fire), TJ Edmonds landmark factory (bulldozed). What emerges is a fascinating social and historical narrative that sheds light on parts of New Zealand’s cultural history and reveals the truth of the old adage that history repeats.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverKiwi bike culture : unique motorbike collections / Steve Holmes.
“Delves into the love affair New Zealanders have with their motorbikes. From Harley-Davidsons to Vespas, and everything in between, this book is about the men and women whose lives revolve, in some way, around two-wheeled machinery.” (Back cover)

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DVDs

New DVDs for March include the acclaimed documentary Blackfish; the latest entry in the Hunger Games franchise; the return of Thor; White House historical drama The Butler; stylish French ‘zombie’ TV Show The Returned; a biography of popular singer Jeff Buckley; and the new British series Ripper Street

Cover imageBlackfish.
“A mesmerising psychological thriller with a killer whale at its centre, Blackfish is the first film since Grizzly Man to show how nature can get revenge on man when pushed to its limits. Blackfish tells the story of Tilikum, a performing killer whale that killed several people while in captivity. Along the way, director-producer Gabriela Cowperthwaite compiles shocking footage and emotional interviews to explore the creature’s extraordinary nature, the species’ cruel treatment in captivity, the lives and losses of the trainers and the pressures brought to bear by the mulit-billion dollar sea-park industry. This emotionally wrenching, tautly structured story challenges us to consider our relationship to nature and reveals how little we humans have learned from these highly intelligent and enormously sentient fellow mammals.” (Publishers Description from Amazon.co.uk)

Cover imageThe hunger games. Catching fire.
“When it comes to blockbuster franchises, the first sequel frequently offers pumped-up versions of the initial thrills–to diminishing results. Catching Fire, however, the second adaptation drawn from Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy, defies that trend with more finely drawn relationships. Despite her best efforts to feign romance with her co-competitor and to keep posttraumatic stress at bay, President Snow (Donald Sutherland) fears that Katniss’s defiant nature will incite rebellion, so he takes a tip from new gamemaker Plutarch (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and launches a Quarter Quell in which past champions, such as the hilariously bitter Johanna (Jena Malone) and the deceptively arrogant Finnick (Sam Claflin), will fight to the death. Not all tributes are quite so young, like Mags (Lynn Cohen), a senior citizen who suits up for battle and establishes a touching bond with Finnick (Jeffrey Wright and Amanda Plummer play the craftiest teammates). Until the cliffhanger ending, director Francis Lawrence (I Am Legend) serves up an array of splendors, from killer baboons to the ever-amazing outfits of Effie and Caesar (Stanley Tucci). Most significantly, the script from cowriter Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire) strengthens the bonds between Katniss and Peeta and Gale (Liam Hemsworth), who prove themselves more worthy than ever of Katniss’s affections.” (Abridged from Amazon.com review)

Cover imageThor. The dark world.
“Action adventure sequel which sees Chris Hemsworth reprise his role as the Marvel Comics superhero Thor, based on the mythical Norse God of Thunder. After the events of Marvel Avengers Assemble (2012), Earth and the Nine Realms come under attack from the powerful Malekith (Christopher Eccleston) and his age-old army that have existed since even before the creation of the universe. With the enemy proving near impossible to defeat, Thor approaches his adoptive brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) for help, despite his villainous past. Meanwhile, the hero becomes reacquainted with the woman he loves, astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), and takes her to Asgard in an attempt to protect her from harm. The cast also includes Anthony Hopkins, Stellan Skarsgård, Kat Dennings and Zachary Levi.” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk)

Cover imageThe butler.
The Butler tells the story of a White House butler who served eight American presidents over three decades. The film traces the dramatic changes that swept American society during this time, from the civil rights movement to Vietnam and beyond, and how those changes affected this man’s life and family. Forest Whitaker stars as the butler with Robin Williams as Dwight Eisenhower, John Cusack as Richard Nixon, Alan Rickman as Ronald Reagan, James Marsden as John F. Kennedy, Liev Schreiber as Lyndon B. Johnson, and many more. Academy Award® nominated Lee Daniels (Precious) directs and co-wrote the script with Emmy®-award winning Danny Strong (Game Change).” (Publishers description from Amazon.com)

Cover imageGreetings from Tim Buckley.
“In 1991, Jeff Buckley rehearses for his public singing debut at a Brooklyn tribute concert for his father, the late folk singer Tim Buckley. Struggling with the legacy of a man he barely knew, Jeff forms a friendship with an enigmatic young woman and begins to discover the powerful potential of his own musical voice. Filled with stirring musical performances and the memorable songs of a father and son who were each among the most beloved singer/songwriters of their respective generations.” (From Library Catalogue)

Cover imageThe returned.
“The fabulously intriguing French TV Series as seen on Channel 4 – The Returned is a unique, stylish and powerful supernatural drama. It follows the residents of a small French alpine town as they come to terms with a series of mysterious and unbelievable occurrences. As a small group of unknowingly deceased men, women and children return from the dead and attempt to re-join the family and friends they left behind years before, the town begins to experience a series of chilling local murders. Beautifully filmed, expertly plotted, and featuring superbly believable performances and an unforgettably atmospheric soundtrack by cult Scottish group Mogwai, The Returned is the most original and enthralling series in years. “The Returned is probably the most stylish thing you’ll see on television this year.” Four stars from The Daily Telegraph.” (Publishers description from Amazon.co.uk)

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Community Languages

不用出门, 就能借中文书啦! 惠林頓图书馆OverDrive电子书库, 新进了数百本中文书籍. 现在你可以学英语, 学中文, 学摄影,学钓鱼,甚至学k歌. 这里还有:育儿书,儿童图画故事书,青少年探险故事书,旅游书, 菜谱, 中医养生, 以及现代小说. 只需在以下链接中http://wcl.govt.nz/downloads/ 点击 OverDrive, 点击右上角的小箭头, 先选择中文, 再点击高级搜索, 在所有语言中(All Languages), 选择Chinese,就可以找到简体和繁体的中文电子书了.

Check out our new Chinese eBooks and eAudio books on OverDrive. It’s a great opportunity to learn Mandarin, Cantonese, and Chinese cultures. To find the Chinese eBooks, select Advanced Search, and in the “All Languages” options, choose Chinese.

We have added around 200 Chinese eBooks, ranging from: romance, sci-fi, mystery, health, history, education, graphic novels, children’s fiction, picture books, and many more. You can also navigate the site in Simplified Chinese. Just select Chinese from the drop-down menu at the very top of the Overdrive page. We will continue to add to the eBook selection as more Chinese titles are added by Overdrive. Happy reading!

Overdrive cover K歌技巧100问, 通过 蔡志辉 (eBook)
“蔡志辉所著的《K歌技巧100问》以一问一答的形式呈现,以帮助业余唱歌爱好者解决演唱中遇到的困惑。其最大特点为问题普遍鲜明,有针对性,回答言简意赅,通俗易懂,即用通俗的语言,专业的方法去解决最棘手的问题。” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Mandarin, 通过 Wei Jin (Audiobook)
“The audio course guides learners through a series of 12 short units. Each unit introduces around 5 new key words or phrases before expanding on the basic vocabulary with practice activities, memory tips and culture and etiquette advice. An accompanying 48-page colour booklet provides full transcripts of the conversations as well as helpful hints to guide the user through their learning experience. Unit 1: Greetings Unit 2: Attracting Attention Unit 3: Exchanging Courtesies Unit 4: Asking Questions Unit 5: Where are you from? Unit 6: Going Places Unit 7: Asking Directions Unit 8: Where can we eat? Unit 9: Getting Transport Unit 10: Ordering a drink Unit 11: Asking for a room Unit 12: All about food!” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover 临时应急会话宝典 (Emergency Conversation Skills), 通过 [爱尔兰]艾诗琳 (eBook)
“本书主要是为英语口语学习者准备的,以句子的形式表达各种情况。句子中包括了实用的词汇及短语。对于有相同说法的词语或句子,书中也做了说明。本书以主题划分,分为十大主题,主题以下又划分为具体的状况,比如:逛街购物时如何讨价还价,挑选衣服;面试找工作时,应聘者如何自我介绍,面试者如何提问;身在外国时需要去药店、去医院等等,涉及日常生活、工作、出国等方方面面,读者可以很轻松地找到应急的那句话。同时还配备MP3,让你听到原汁原味的英音。” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover 实用钓鱼百科 (Encyclopedia for Fishing), 通过 徐仁行 (eBook)
“钓鱼为什么对人有如此大的吸引力呢?有人说:”钓鱼之乐不在鱼”,”一竿在手,其乐无比。”钓鱼爱好者把钓鱼视为人生的一大乐趣。当你在紧张的工作之余,到江河湖海去领略一下大自然的风光,呼吸清新的空气,享受一下鱼儿咬钩时的快感与乐趣,这是没钓过鱼的人所无法体会的。钓鱼活动还是一种很好的锻炼身体的方法,与打太极拳、练健身操、舞剑等活动有同样的趣味性。如果你能经常参加钓鱼活动,对你的身体健康肯定大有好处。特别是对那些患植物神经功能紊乱、神经衰弱、心悸胸闷、轻度肺结核的病人以及身体处于病后康复期的人更有益处。同时,钓鱼活动还非常适合中老年人的生理特点。它既缓解了工作的压力,排除不良情绪,又可以充实生活,排遣空虚,同时可以抗老防衰,延年益寿。” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover 最热最热的76个科学知识:蚊子血真能造出恐龙吗? ( 76 Most Awesome Trivia Questions: Can we clone a dinosaur by using the blood of a mosquito? ), 通过 Da Mi (eBook)
“肉食动物只吃草能活下去吗?斑马到底是黑底白纹,还是白底黑纹?蜘蛛丝真的比钢筋还强韧?……每当抚摸小狗毛茸茸的身体,你是否想过与地球上的所有动物都成为知心朋友?快快翻开这本《蚊子血真能造出恐龙吗?》吧,你将在开怀大笑中,获得天文、地理、历史、文化、科学等方面许许多多有趣的知识。” (Overdrive description)

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Cooking

This month’s recent picks feature books from the budget-hero blog A Girl Called Jack and the delicious bad-things-free experiment that is The Extra Virgin Kitchen from Sunday Independent food writer Susan Jane White. We’ve hidden some treats among there too ;p

Syndetics book coverA Girl Called Jack : 100 delicious budget recipes / Jack Monroe ; photography by Susan Bell.
“Jack is a woman of our times, facing head-on the realities of recession-hit Britain and responding with a ‘make do and mend’ way of thinking that we should all consider. When she found herself unemployed and with a food budget of just 10 pounds a week, she decided to address the situation by adapting her weekly shop and embracing the value range of her local supermarket. Keeping to her budget, she created recipe after recipe of nutritious food for herself and her son, which she then posted on her blog, A Girl Called Jack. In her first cookbook, Jack shows you how to adapt the way you shop to be less wasteful, and to value the techniques of inexpensive but good cooking. Her recipes are reassuring and just the thing to make confident, budget-conscious cooks of us all, suggesting great alternative ingredients and different approaches to getting a good result – this is real food for real people.” (Cover)

Syndetics book coverThe Extra Virgin Kitchen : recipes for wheat-free, sugar-free and dairy-free eating / by Susan Jane White ; [photography by Joanne Murphy].
“When Sunday Independent food writer Susan Jane White was told to stay away from wheat, dairy and refined sugar due to intolerances, she created seriously tasty recipes that didn’t compromise her health. The result? Susan’s energy levels went through the roof and her friends and family began to look for her ‘free-from’ recipes whether or not they had intolerances.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverSweet / Alison Thompson ; photography by Sharyn Cairns.
“This new collection from Alison Thompson, best-selling author of Bake, celebrates desserts in every delicious form: creamy, fudgy, gooey, molten, fruity, refreshing, chocolatey, crunchy, chewy, light-as-air or sinfully rich. From elaborate show-stoppers to comforting family puddings, Alison’s clear, straightforward recipes guarantee sweet success, every time.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverThe Secret Ingredient Family Cookbook : healthy meals for all the family / Sally Bee.
“Eating a healthy diet doesn’t mean you have to miss out on your family favourites. Pizzas, burgers, even a creamy curry bursting with flavour, can be made in a healthier ways. In this book, Sally Bee shows you how to enjoy the full array of colours and flavours that make up a happy family dinner without all the fat, sugar and salt.” (Book Jacket)

Syndetics book coverAnnabel’s Family Cookbook : 100 simple, delicious recipes that everyone will enjoy / Annabel Karmel ; [photography by Martin Poole].
“In this beautiful cookbook, Britain’s bestselling children’s food writer, Annabel Karmel, offers her favourite dishes for busy week nights and busy weekends.
– Speedy recipes that take no more than 30 minutes
– Ideas for leisurely brunches and Sunday lunches
– Food to prepare ahead and store in your fridge or freezer
– Easy recipes for relaxed entertaining
– Delicious snacks, salads and lunchbox ideas
– Foolproof, impressive cakes for parties and teatimes.” (Book jacket)

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Crafts

It’s been an exiting time for our crafty library team, cataloguing and sorting out all these cool and ‘delicious’ craft books, which are packed with inspiring knitting, quilting, crocheting and sewing projects. If you are ready for an artistic journey take a look at some of our latest arrivals. Get inspiration with new ideas and learn great techniques through the numerous step-by-step tutorials and tips. And, there is much more… You are offered guidance on how to market your craft business, ways to engage with customers, sell your work online and move your business forward with confidence. Happy crafting!

Syndetics book coverOnce upon a knit : 28 Grimm and glamorous fairy-tale projects / Genevieve Miller. “Iconic fairy-tale characters from storybooks, movies, and television inspire this collection of magical knitting patterns perfect for modern knights, villains, and princesses. Once again, Genevieve Miller taps a wide range of contributors (from knitwear designers to students) to create a collection of 28 wearables, accessories, and toys that can be knit for adults or kids. Inspired by the recent resurgence of fairy-tale and fantasy characters, these projects draw from classic stories as well as pop-culture phenomena featuring romantic, feminine costumes. Projects range from kid- and teen-friendly animals hats to an Alice in Wonderland beret to a crystal-embellished vest fit for a Snow Queen, adding a little dress-up fun to knitters’ everyday wardrobes.” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverQuilting with a modern slant : people, patterns, and techniques inspiring the modern quilt community / Rachel May. “May, a founder of the Boston Modern Quilt Guild, has created an encyclopedia of modern quilting. So-called “modern” quilting labels the latest category of quilting, following “traditional” and “art.” Modern quilting-admittedly hard to pin down, but proudly inclusive-is a hybrid of the other two, resulting in quilts that “perform both a design and functional purpose.” May divides her book into seven sections with titles that reflect the whimsy and experimentation that help define modern quilting, including “A Sense of Play,” “Improv,” and “For the Love of Color.” Within those chapters, she presents modern quilters (”Meet”), such as Angela Walters, David Butler, and Caro Sheridan; offers directions (”Project”) for techniques like paper piecing and for quilts, like Sherri Lynn Wood’s modern t-shirt quilt; and covers history and museums. Sidebars cite quilters’ blogs and places to donate quilts, among other information. Crawls at the bottom of pages define words (”Quilt Lingo”) and blurbed quotes from quilters and their blogs are scattered throughout for encouragement. Like a good host, May serves as an enthusiastic introducer, teacher, and cheerleader.” (Adapted from Publisher Weekly)

Syndetics book coverBaby crochet / Sue Whiting ; [photography by Sian Irvine and Paul Bricknell]. “Create beautiful baby clothes with these quick- to-make designs. 24 gorgeous designs for babies, ranging from pretty cardigans and cosy jackets to hats, bootees, mitts and toys.” (Book cover)

Syndetics book coverVintage crafts : 75 do-it-yourself decorating projects using candles, colors, and other flea market finds / author & photographer, Clara Lidström ; translated by Anette Cantagallo. “In this book, which is based on her blog, Lidstrom plays that pretty, talented friend who makes flea market finds and shabby chic decor seem enviable. The author makes make-do and mend look like high design, from her collection of “beloved” vintage dresses to a “scrapbooked” linen cabinet decorated with wallpaper. The author never lets her flea market evangelizing (”I fear that we’re annihilating our heritage in the rush to constantly consume what’s new and modern.”) overtake her enthusiasm at remaking a great bargain. Her favorite thing to do is to “pimp” her finds: a set of old speakers with lace, notebooks with vintage girls’ book covers, and a lampshade. The book contains a few gems, such as a recipe for wallpaper paste using water, sugar, and potato flour, as well as tips for freshening up old clothes with flaxseed oil soft soap. Her advice isn’t always new-using newspaper to form cups for seedlings or attaching jar lids underneath a shelf-but no matter. The book is less a practicum and more an idiosyncratic and inspiring romp through the charming space that Lidstrom has created from scraps and paint. Framing that world is a series of gorgeous, light-filled, photos, in which the author and her son often play a supporting role to the author’s lime-and-red retro kitchen or her tastefully unkempt vegetable garden.” (Adapted from Library Journal)

Syndetics book cover “How to show & sell your crafts : how to build your craft business at home, online, and in the marketplace / Torie Jayne. “Online marketplaces like Etsy have opened up a new world for crafters who want to make money from their work, and UK-based Jayne, whose aesthetic is part English country house, part “put a bird on it” quirk, enlists the help of a number of successful craft entrepreneurs for this collection of tips for making a living selling creations. Though the title is presented as a book on showing and selling crafts, it comes across as more of a lifestyle manual, with cutesy projects taking the place of practical advice. Some of Jayne’s suggestions are a little odd-does it really matter if you cover your storage boxes with floral wallpaper, or if the chair you sit in to work is “stylish”?-but her tips on branding will be helpful to those who are new to marketing their wares. Those who have already mastered the basics and are looking to take their fledgling businesses to the next level may prefer Kari Chapin’s Grow Your Handmade Business, which focuses less on making your workspace pretty and more on selling handmade goods as a livelihood. VERDICT Crafters who are just starting out may find some handy tips here, but only if they’re willing to wade through all the style-related fluff to find the nuggets of wisdom.” (Library Journal)

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The Lutheran Church in New Zealand

It was such a joyous occasion, one Sunday in December, when whānau and friends of Hamuera Te Punga gathered at St John’s Lutheran Church, Halcombe to commemorate the ordination of Hamuera, 100 years ago, in Springfield, 1912.

It was a day of whanaungatanga rooted in memories of Hamuera’s work, and his wife Lydia – whose musical influence was reflected in the robust part harmony singing, and a rendition of her unique version of the Lord’s Prayer.

But what of the origins of the Lutheran Church in New Zealand? There are fascinating stories of the early Lutheran missionaries, who, although small in, number, made a huge impact on Pākehā-Māori relationships in the 19th Century as they worked to establish Māori missions.

Come, begin this journey with me – through The Lutheran story : a brief history of the Lutheran Church in New Zealand, 1843-1993 by Jean A. King.

Ref: PAColl-0058-10. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand
Missionary Johannes Gottfried Engst. Photographed in 1874 by William H Rau. Alexander Turnbull Library, Ref: PAColl-0058-10.

The Gossner Mission Society sent five young men – Oskar Beyer, Tohan Baucke, Johannes Engst, David Muller and Franz Schirmeister to Whakaru Bay, Chathams, in February, 1843. By 1850, it became clear that the mission was not viable, and, over time, only Engst remained on the island, where he died in 1910.

In the South Island, New Zealand, land purchased by The New Zealand Company for its Nelson settlement attracted – through newspaper advertisements – a group of emigrants (mostly Lutheran) from North Germany and the Rhineland. The ship St Pauli arrived in Nelson, June, 1843.

Portrait of the Reverend Johann Friedrich Heinrich Wohlers. Ref: 1/2-037421-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand
Portrait of the Reverend Johann Friedrich Heinrich Wohlers. Ref: 1/2-037421-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand

The North German Mission Society sponsored a second wave of missionaries to work with Māori, and on board the ship were two ordained ministers, Johann Friedrich Heinrich Wohlers and Johann Friedrich Riemenschneider, with two students, H. H. Trost and J.W.C. Heine.

Wohlers feared for their effectiveness as they were entering a British colony, with British settlers, and he felt that they would be seen as intruders in the landscape. He was greatly disappointed to find very few Māori in that part of the Nelson area, and their early efforts to establish a base was also thwarted somewhat by torrential rain and floods.

Ruins of the Rev. J.F. Wohlers’ house, Ruapuke Island. March 1895.
Ruins of the Rev. J.F. Wohlers’ house, Ruapuke Island. March 1895. Elizabeth Mary Hocken.

Wohlers ventured south, and eventually founded a mission at Ruapuke Island, under the shelter of Tuhawaiki. The little community thrived until the opening up of the mainland. He died on Steward Island 1885.

Rev. J. F. Riemenschneider. Source: NZ Electronic Text Collection
Rev. J. F. Riemenschneider. Etching from Christian Missions in The South Island of New Zealand. Source: NZ Electronic Text Collection

J F Riemenschneider turned to Taranaki with a Mr Wieghtman, toward the Mokau River, meeting up with Henry Schnackenberg who was at the Methodist mission station. He attempted to set up a base in an area populated by Māori catholics, but then, with the assistance of H H Turton, moved to Warea, in Taranaki where he fulfilled a number of roles – as doctor, judge, builder, cabinetmaker, agricultural worker, and advocate for Māori in local body, and an advisor to government on Māori land.

His refusal to align himself with Māori, during the Taranaki Wars, 1860, however, caused a rift, resulting in his move to Nelson, and then Otakou Heads where he died in 1866.

Reverend Johann Heine at the Lutheran parsonage at Upper Moutere. Heine, Clara Mathilde. Ref: 1/2-032576-G. Alexander Turnbull Library.
Reverend Johann Heine at the Lutheran parsonage at Upper Moutere. Heine, Clara Mathilde. Ref: 1/2-032576-G. Alexander Turnbull Library.

J. C. W. Heine had been left to attend to the German settlers in Nelson, taking on roles of teacher and pastor. He sold the NZ Company land in Nelson, purchasing a base in the Moutere, Waimea, Ranzau area. And he named his settlement Sarau.

Heine approached the Hermannsburg Mission Society for help with finances and personnel for both a Māori mission and for the German Lutherans.

Portrait of Rev Johann Heinrich Christoph Dierks. Taken by William Henry Thomas Partington, 1854-1940. Ref: PAColl-5871-05. Alexander Turnbull Library.
Portrait of Rev Johann Heinrich Christoph Dierks. Taken by William Henry Thomas Partington, 1854-1940. Ref: PAColl-5871-05. Alexander Turnbull Library.

Firstly came C F Meyer (from Adelaide), then Christoph Direks, H W Kower, H Loose and J F Goessling, 1876. Christoph Dierks (Waitotara) and his brother Hartwig (Maxwelltown) were the most successful in working with Māori.

Pastor G Blaess worked in the area of Parihaka until 1906. Although Te Whiti and Tohu did not allow their people to attend his services, they did allow them to attend “singsongs” which the musically gifted Blaess organised.

Hamuera Te Punga

Pastor Blaess met with Hamuera Te Punga, of Waiwhetu, and asked him to translate the Lord’s Prayer, and Luther’s Small Catechism into Māori.

Hamuera was encouraged to study for the ministry and was sent, with Henry Harting to a Lutheran Seminary at Springfield in United States. Hamuera married Lydia Gose, and returned to New Zealand in 1912.

After working in the Lower Hutt area, Hamuera was invited to the St Johns Lutheran Church at Halcombe where he remained until his death in 1968.

Bibliography:

King, Jean A. The Lutheran story : a brief histoy of the Lutheran Church in New Zealand 1843-1993. Lutheran Church of New Zealand, 1994.

Memories of my life : J.F.H. Wohlers : missionary at Ruapuke, New Zealand : an autobiography / translated from the German by John Houghton ; edited by
Sheila Natusch.

and,

Syndetics book coverGod’s messenger : J.F. Riemenschneider and racial conflict in 19th century New Zealand / Peter Oettli.
” God’s Messenger is a new biography of the North German missionary Rev. J.F. Riemenschneider, who settled in the Taranaki region in the first half of the nineteenth century. The book not only details the life and work of Riemenschneider but also examines the socio-political context of nineteenth century New Zealand. It documents the social Conditions of Taranaki Maori in the mid-nineteenth century and increasing tensions between colonists and Maori, leading to the land wars with Taranaki. Book jacket.” (Syndetics summary)

Pāhuatanga o Parihaka – 7 November event

Parihaka, 1881 by George Clarendon Beale; Ref. A65.651; Collection of Puke Ariki, New Plymouth. Used with permissionAt the beginning of November our minds turn to Guy Fawkes and fireworks.  But on 5 November 1881,Taranaki iwi and friends were faced with Bryce’s cannon and 1600 volunteers and Armed Constabulary troops. Unlike  Guy Fawkes, Te Whiti o Rongomai, Tohu Kakahi and their followers embraced passive resistance.  These were the men who struggled to prevent seizure of their whenua in Taranaki, by ploughing the land, and removing survey pegs, all of which led to the plundering of Parihaka by government forces, on that day in 1881.

We have some great books in the library, telling and retelling these tragic times for iwi:

Days of darkness : Taranaki 1878-1884 by Hazel Riseborough
“What happened at Parihaka is one of New Zealand’s great untold historical stories. As the title indicates, this book deals with a dark period in New Zealand history; a period too few people know about. Te Whiti led Maori tribes in their response to the government’s attempts to seize Maori land.” (catalogue summary).

Image courtesy of SyndeticsAsk that mountain by Dick Scott.
“Journalist and historian Dick Scott broke new ground with Ask That Mountain. Scott draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral histories to give first complete account of what took place at Parihaka, a small settlement at the foot of Mount Taranaki where the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu opposed the colonial government in the latter half of the nineteenth century û making one of the world’s first recorded campaigns of passive resistance.” (adapted from Syndetics summary)

Image courtesy of SyndeticsIn August 2000-January 2001, Wellington City Gallery hosted a millennium exhibition  – Parihaka :  the art of Passive Resistance. The book of the exhibition,  edited by Te Miringa Hohaia, Gregory O’Brien, and Lara Strongman and published by City Gallery, Wellington, Victoria University Press, and Parihaka Pā Trustees,  brings together beautiful works and  images, including an interesting collection of waiata, poi manu, and whakawai, originally gathered and preserved by Te Whiti and Tohu.

Image courtesy of Syndetics2010 brought Contested ground = Te whenua i tohea : the Taranaki Wars 1860-1881 edited by Kelvin Day and published by Huia Publishers.  This book won CLL – Copyright Licensing Ltd Education Publishing Awards : Best Book in Higher Education Winner. and the History Award of Ngā Kupu Ora Māori Book Awards, Massey University, 2010.

To understand the history of Taranaki iwi and one of their unique cultural developments – the Parihaka poi manu, you may be interested in viewing Waka Huia’s videos on the tribal history of Taranaki on YouTube.

Come, hear these stories on 7 November, Central Library, Ground Floor, at 12.30 pm.

(Parihaka image used with permission: Parihaka, 1881 by George Clarendon Beale; Ref. A65.651; Collection of Puke Ariki, New Plymouth.)

parihakasa

ANZAC Day – Your Ancestors’ Military Past

GenealogyInterested in researching your family history?
From time to time we’ll be posting genealogy facts and advice here on the News Blog.
For other blog entries on genealogy, click on the tag “genealogy” at the bottom of this post.

Australians and New Zealanders know ANZAC day – 25th April – as a national day of remembrance to honour members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who fought at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I.

Did you have a relative who took part in WW1? Would you like to read their Military Personnel Record?

Military records can provide amazing details for genealogists, especially ages and places of birth, while they can also expand family histories with information about campaigns, conduct and even physical descriptions of ancestors.

Continue reading “ANZAC Day – Your Ancestors’ Military Past”