Postcards, urupa, travelling taonga

Two interesting books on the history of the New Zealand postcard have interesting examples of early Māori themed portraits and scenes. Then there is the inside story on Tariana Turia, and a biased spin on the activities of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata

Syndetics book coverCrossing the floor : the story of Tariana Turia / Helen Leahy.
“This biography of Tariana Turia sees family members, iwi leaders, social justice advocates and politicians share their experiences of this remarkable woman. While parliament was not originally part of her life plan, Tariana Turia was involved in many community initiatives. A turning point came in 1995, when Tariana’s leadership was evident in the reoccupation of Pakaitore. Here was a woman with the courage to care, the determination to speak up and a deep commitment to whānau. Inevitably, she was invited to stand in the 1996 general election. In her eighteen years as an MP, she advanced thinking in the disability area, advocated for tobacco reform and spoke out about sexual abuse, violence and racism. She also led the Whānau Ora initiative. In 2004, she crossed the floor, leading to the birth of the Māori Party”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverKo Ngā Takahanga i a Ārihi i Te Ao Mīharo / Lewis Carroll ; nā John Tenniel i whakaahua; nā Tom Roa i whakamāori.He ingoa karangaranga a Lewis Carroll: Ko Charles Lutwidge Dodgson te ingoa tuturu. He kaikauwhau i te Pangarau i Christ Church, Oxford. — Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford.

Syndetics book coverUnearthly landscapes : New Zealand’s early cemeteries, churchyards and urupā / Stephen Deed.
“… Immigrants brought with them a range of burial traditions, and of course Maori, already long established, had their own rituals. Over time, the various customs borrowed from one another to form a uniquely New Zealand way. In this beautifully written and illustrated book, Stephen Deed sets out to reconnect the historic cemeteries we see today with the history of this country and its people.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTell you what : great New Zealand nonfiction 2015 / edited by Jolisa Gracewood & Susanna Andrew.
“A fantastic collection of recent nonfiction essays, Tell You What contains live, wild, true stories from contemporary New Zealand. On the web and the wireless, in magazines and journals, at prizegivings and powhiri, New Zealanders are writing about the world. Essays and articles, speeches and submissions, tweets and travelogues–this book collects some of New Zealand’s best nonfiction from the past year into one anthology. Featuring New Zealand writers such as Steve Braunias, Lara Strongman, Eleanor Catton, and Tina Makereti, it explores a range of subjects, from mountain climbing and family secrets to cannibal snails and dangerous swims.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSend me a postcard : New Zealand postcards and the story they tell / William Main.
“The first New Zealand picture postcards were published in 1897, and quickly established themselves as an enduring and popular part of our visual culture. In the early part of the 20th century sending postcards snowballed into a craze which had few precedents (it is estimated that 7.5 million postcards were sent through the mail in 1909) … This charming and nostalgic collection of postcards is popular history at its best, and will have wide appeal. The cards are graphically fascinating, while the story they tell provides an intriguing view of life in New Zealand in the last century.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPost marks : the way we were : early New Zealand postcards, 1897-1922 / Leo Haks, Colleen Dallimore & Alan Jackson.
The way we were between 1897-1922 is revealed in more than 500 postcards that highlight New Zealand’s pioneer beginnings and the development of a unique cultural identity.

Tracking travelling taonga : a narrative review of how Māori items got to London from 1798, to Salem in 1802, 1807 and 1812, and elsewhere up to 1840 / by Rhys Richards. Machine-generated contents note: A French Visit to North Cape on 11 March 1793 — Lieutenant-Governor King from Norfolk Island to Muriwhenua in 1793 — The Fancy Trading for spars at Waihou (Thames) in 1795 — Mathew Flinders’ Tiki in 1795 — Sealers, Early Whalers and Spar Traders — American Traders to China — How Daniel Ward’s Donations Reached Salem in 1802 — The Donations of John Fitzpatrick Jeffrie in 1803 — The Donations of Captain William Richardson in 1807 — The Donations of Captain William Putnam Richardson in 1812 — Pacific Sealskins, Sandalwood and Beche de Mer — Other Early Taonga in American Collections — The Russians at Queen Charlotte Sound in 1820 — The Early Missionaries: Kendall and Marsden — The British Navy’s Search for Spars 1820-21 — Muskets for Preserved Heads from 1810 to 1840 — The French Collectors from 1824 to 1840 — Taonga in Other European Museums — Sperm Whalers from 1820 to 1840 — Six British Collectors of Taonga, 1820 to 1840 — The Three Maori Cloaks Donated by Mr C. Pettet — The Flax Trade from 1828 to 1833 — The Global Travels of the Mokomokai Daniel Aborn donated in 1831 — Taonga from the South Island — Remaining British Collections 1820 to 1840 — The United States Exploring Expedition in 1840 — Lost Provenances — Retrospect: The Collecting of Taonga before 1840.

Of Paekakariki : poetry, prose, pictures / collected by Sylvia Bagnall ; foreword by Sir John Trimmer.
“”Poetry, stories and artwork by people with a connection to Paekakariki”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Two great New Zealanders : the wisdom of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata / John Robinson.

John Miller – in conversation about his historic photographs of the Māori Land March

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Photographer John Miller with one of his photographs of the Māori Land March when it arrived in Wellington on October 13 1975. John was photographed at Te Unga Waka Marae in Auckland, at the commemorations of the 40th anniversary of the March in September 2015. Credit: John Miller

Acclaimed documentary photographer John Miller (Ngāpuhi) has documented social and political dissent and cultural events for more than four decades.  John photographed the Wellington section of the 1975 Māori Land March; from Porirua to its arrival at Parliament grounds.  The photographs have become well-known following their reproduction in books, exhibitions and school resources. In this session, John will talk with Paul Diamond about his photographs of the Māori Land March, and his involvement with the march organisers, Te Roopu o te Matakite.

A Wellington City Libraries talk, organised in partnership with the National Library, as part of the Turnbull Gallery exhibition, ‘Not one more acre’: The Māori Land March 40 years on.

Supported by LIANZA Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui regional group.

When: 12.30-1.30pm, Wednesday 21 October
Where: Ground floor, Wellington Central Library
Cost: Free

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The Māori Land March on the Wellington motorway, October 13 1975.
Credit: John Miller

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina : a biography of Whina Cooper / Michael King.

Syndetics book coverRaupatu : the confiscation of Māori land / edited by Richard Boast and Richard S. Hill.

Not One More Acre: A Conversation with Ans Westra at the Central Library

Ans Westra Poster6smallb

This October marks the 40th anniversary of the 1975 Māori Land March – when Dame Whina Cooper lead marchers to Parliament to protest the loss of Māori lands. “Not One More Acre of Māori Land” became the catch-cry of the marchers, who left Te Hāpua in the far north on 14 September as a group numbering no more than 50, and eventually reached Wellington on 13 October as a powerful hikoi numbering at over 5000.

Iconic photographer Ans Westra captured this event and on Tuesday 6 October Wellington Central Library will be hosting a talk with this renowned and well-loved photographer, who will describe her experience of attending and photographing the historic march. From Thursday 1st October there will also be an exhibition of contact sheet prints of Ans Westra’s photographs of the arrival of the march in Wellington on 13 October 1975.

A Conversation with Ans Westra
Tuesday 6 October at 12.30pm
2nd floor, Central Library

Syndetics book coverWashday at the pa / photographs by Ans Westra ; with text by Mark Amery.
Washday at the pa, by New Zealand premier photographers Ans Westra, was first published as a photo-story booklet in 1964 by the Department of Education for use in Primary Schools, but all 38,000 copies were withdrawn following a campaign by the Maori Women’s Welfare League that it would have a ‘detrimental effect’ on Maori people – and that the living conditions portrayed within the book were atypical. A second edition of the booklet was published the same years with some images omitted. This edition is a selection of these two editions together with photographs of the washday family taken in 1988, and includes essays by arts critic, journalist and broadcaster Mark Amery detailing the controversy and background of Washday at the pa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNga tau ki muri = Our future / Ans Westra.
“This timely and visionary new book includes 137 Westra photographs of the New Zealand landscape, with text contributions from Hone Tuwhare, Russel Norman, Brian Turner, David Eggleton and David Lange, who wrote a short piece for Ans as part of an unrealised book project in 1987. Well known for her iconic black and white documentation of Maori culture, Ans Westra is also known for her colour works, which show concern for New Zealand’s destiny, “an island exploited by various waves of settlement”. Shot with Ans’ trusty Rolleiflex camera, the sometimes damning images in Our Future have been made over the last 20 years. “The purpose of the book is to give a directive to the country, an awareness of things changed and lost within its short history. If we don’t plan for the long term and keep taking stop-gap measures, we leave very little behind. Instead of becoming like the rest of the world, this beautiful place should become a shining example of hope for survival in a newly balanced environment.” –Ans Westra.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina [videorecording] : mother of the nation.
“The autobiography of Maori land activist Dame Whina Cooper filmed two years before she died. Born in an earth-floor whare she became a teacher, gum digger, rugby coach, midwife, a tribal leader, president of Maori Women’s Welfare League and controversial leader of the Maori Land March. Who organized her first public protest at the age of 18.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHandboek : Ans Westra photographs / [exhibition curator and coordinator, Luit Bieringa ; texts, Cushla Parekowhai [et. al]].

Ans Westra [videorecording] : private journeys/public signposts / director, Luit Bieringa ; producer, Jan Bieringa.
New Zealand photographer, Ans Westra, talks about her career.

Missionaries, education, arts, media, politics : as usual a broad range of subjects touching on Te Ao Māori.

Syndetics book coverMāori art : history, architecture, landscape and theory / Rangihiroa Panoho ; with photographs by Mark Adams & Haruhiko Sameshima.
“Up until now books on Maori art have described the work as either traditional (carving, weaving, painting) or contemporary, work produced post-1950s. This book presents a unique focus on Maori art by exploring the connection between the traditional and contemporary, and the place of Maori art within an international context. Maori Art provides a framework for looking at Maori art in a new way and fills a gap in Maori art history – while there are myriad surveys of Maori art there is currently very little critical writing on Maori art and artists”….(Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby : not here by chance / Jeff Evans.
“This biography of Heke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby brings together the varied life experiences that have made Hec Busby the master waka builder, waka expert, celestial navigator and highly regarded Te Rarawa elder that he is today. He is one of the few active waka taua builders and is responsible for the completion of more than a dozen of these waka for iwi around the country… His entrepreneurial and leadership skills along with his tribal and tikanga knowledge have led to his involvement in iwi activities as well as in organising Waitangi commemorations, kapa haka, ocean-going voyages, and waka wananga to pass on his knowledge to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe good doctor : breaking the rules, making a difference / Lance O’Sullivan with Margie Thomson.
“Lance O’Sullivan is a man on a mission. Raised in Auckland by a solo mother, he had a modest upbringing typical of the time, if one chequered with difficulties. After being expelled from two schools, Lance could have gone off the rails. Instead, he found his way at Hato Petera College, connecting with his Māori ancestry, and going on to study medicine… For his work, Lance has been acknowledged as a Sir Peter Blake Emerging Leader, Public Health Champion, Māori of the Year and, most recently, Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year. Passionate, brave and free-thinking, Lance stood up when no one else would…”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTauira : Māori methods of learning and teaching / Joan Metge.Based on extensive interviews, this book offers a window on a mid-twentieth-century rural Māori world as described by those who grew up there. Metge’s work tackles important questions about Māori teaching and learning of this period. What was the role of whānau and hapū, household and marae, kaumātua and siblings, work and play? How much learning was practical and how much by teaching?”–Publisher information. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: Chapter 1: Voices from the Past — Chapter 2: Learning as Part of Living — Chapter 3: Teaching and Learning — Chapter 4: Spirituality and Values — Chapter 5: Learning in Maturity as Part of Living — Chapter 6: Storehouses of Knowledge — Chapter 7: Wānanga — Chapter 8: Storytelling — Chapter 9: Learning in the School System — Chapter 10: Educational Practices and Principles.

Syndetics book coverAt the margin of Empire : John Webster and Hokianga, 1841-1900 / Jennifer Ashton.
“Born in Scotland in 1818, John Webster came in New Zealand via Australia in 1841 after narrowly escaping death in the outback following a violent encounter with a group of Aboriginal men. He spent most of the rest of his life in the Hokianga region, carving out a fortune as the region’s leading timber trader and cultivating connections with the leading political figures of the day… Webster was also engaged with Pākehā and the Crown – friends with Frederick Maning, visited by George Grey, Richard Seddon and others… Ashton argues that through his daily interactions, Webster helped slowly shift the balance of power in the North: the credit that he extended to his customers and kin saw them selling land to pay debts, helping push Māori into economic dependence”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverEntanglements of empire : missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body / Tony Ballantyne.
“The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. ENTANGLEMENTS OF EMPIRE is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period… Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality and missionaries found it was difficult to maintain their own practices because of their dependence on Maori chiefly patrons as well as the material constraints and social conflicts. ….” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPanguru and the city : kāinga tahi, kāinga rua : an urban migration history / Melissa Matutina Williams.
“Travelling from Hokianga to Auckland in the middle decades of the twentieth century, the people of Panguru established themselves in the workplaces, suburbs, churches and schools of the city. Melissa Matutina Williams writes from the heart of these communities. The daughter of a Panguru family growing up in Auckland, she writes a perceptive account of urban migration through the stories of the Panguru migrants. Through these vibrant oral narratives, the history of Maori migration is relocated to the tribal and whanau context in which it occurred. For the people of Panguru, migration was seldom viewed as a one-way journey of new beginnings; it was experienced as a lifelong process of developing a ‘co-existent home place’ for themselves and future generations. Dreams of a brighter future drew on the cultural foundations of a tribal homeland and past. PANGURU AND THE CITY: HE KAINGA RUA traces their negotiations with people and places, from Auckland’s inner-city boarding houses, places of worship and dance halls to workplaces and Maori Affairs’ homes in the suburbs. It is a history that will resonate with Maori from all tribal areas who shared in the quiet task of working against state policies of assimilation, the economic challenges of the 1970s and neoliberal policies of the 1980s in order to develop dynamic Maori community sites and networks which often remained invisible in the cities of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

The brown book : Māori in screen production / written by Dr. Ella Henry and Melissa Wikaire. Contents include: Origins of the Brown Book ; Māori and the screen industry ; working with Māori in screen production ;
Appendices: Māori society ; an overview ; Ngā Aho Whakaari executive members ; Māori production companies ‘ Māori iwi radio stations ‘ pan-tribal organisations ; screen industry organisations ; television broadcasters.

Māori carving : the art of recording Māori history / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“This photograph-rich book shows and describes the process of carving, covering the types of materials and tools used, the carving strokes and surface patterns and different regional styles. It shows the range of items carved from meeting houses to musical instruments, waka or canoes, storehouses, weapons and ceremonial items, such as boxes and staffs, and gives detailed information on the carving of wharenui or meeting houses – the epitome of the carver’s art. Information is given on how to read and understand a carving, looking in depth at parts of carvings and what to look for in elements such as the head, arms and hands of figures and the surface patterns used. The patterns and body styles are described and accompanied by detailed photographs that make identification of the elements easy. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maōri culture. The others are: Geothermal Treasures: Māori Living with Heat and Steam; Māori Weaving: The Art of Creating Māori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Māori Culture”–Publisher information.

Māori weaving : the art of creating Māori textiles / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Since their ancestors arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand and discovered the useful properties of harakeke (New Zealand flax), Maori have used flax leaves to create baskets, mats, housing materials, clothing and cords, ropes and fishing nets. In weaving and the patterns used, Maori record their histories and stories, passing on their culture, genealogy, values and beliefs, weaving together people and communities”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Marae : the heart of Māori culture / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“”Step-by-step guide to a powhiri, or welcome ceremony, showing and describing what happens, the people involved, what they do, and the values and understandings underpinning the ceremony. There is also a close look at the outside and inside of a wharenui, or meeting house, showing each of the elements and features that make it up. Maori cultural concepts are explained and discussed and a glossary of Maori terms is provided”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Geothermal treasures : Māori living with heat and steam / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Natural geothermal phenomena – geysers, hot springs and mud pools – have drawn people to the thermal region of New Zealand for years. Locals and tourists are captivated by the beauty and magic of bubbling mud, steam and hot water gushing from the earth. New Zealand’s world-class geothermal resource is a source of energy, a tourist attraction and a treasure of great historical, cultural, spiritual and economic importance for Maori. In this book, Maori traditional stories, understandings and history stand alongside geothermal science in an exploration of the thermal phenomena of the Volcanic Plateau. Beautiful photographs show the hot pools, rising steam, geysers, bubbling mud and thermal formations that visitors see, and the text provides information about the natural history of the area, its formation and its significance to Maori. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maori culture. The others are: Maori Carving: The Art of Preserving Maori History; Maori Weaving: The Art of Creating Maori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Maori Culture”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Lives of colonial objectives edited by Annabel Cooper, Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla. Otago University Press, 2015.
p. 20. Intimate immensity : a pūtorino in the Peabody Essex Museum by Lucy Mackintosh.
p. 27. Te Haupapa by Pāoria Tapsell
p. 35. Voyaging taonga : the Kīngi tauihi by Kelvin Day.
p. 110. Retrieved from oblivion? Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitaake and the photographic object by Ruth Harvey.
p. 117. ‘A sparrow alone upon the house top’ : the Te Pihoihoi Press by Lachy Paterson.
p. 122. He rau mahara : te wananga ledger by Migoto Eria.
p. 129. Minute books : an integral part of the Māori Land Court by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 134. A road into Te Urewera by Annabel Cooper.
p. 170. Te Tokotoko by Megan Pōtiki.
p. 206. Katherine Mansfield’s hei tiki by Jane Stafford.
p. 212. Te pai o ngā āhua : the visitors’ books at the Lindauer Art Gallery by Roger Blackley.
p. 219. Toko toru tapu : a tale of four churches by Damian Skinner,
p. 231. Māori monument or Pākehā propaganda? the memorial to Keepa Te Rangihiwinui, Whanganui by Ewan Morris.
p. 253. ‘Pōua’s cloak’ : the Haberield family kahu kiwi by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 311. Aferword : ther wharenui Mataatua, and some thoughts about things by Conal McCarthy and Jonathan Mane-Wheoki.

New Zealand government and politics edited by Janine Hayward. 6th ed. OUP, 2015.
p. 4. Māori political history 1860-1960 by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 84. Marxism by Evan Te Ahu Poata-Smith.
p. 240. The Māori Party by Morgan Godfery.
p. 300. The Māori seats by Maria Bargh.
p. 511. Youth engagement by Veronica M. H. Tawhai.

Coutts, Brent and Nicholas Fitness. Protest in New Zealand. Pearson, 2013.
p. 83. Maori resistance to military service.
p. 171. Maori feminist issues

Overland ; issue 219 (Winter,2015)
Features: Anton Blank. Change is the only constant (on gay role models) ; Catriona MacLennan. The ethics of defence (layers and rape trials) ; Fiction: Tina Makereti. Monster ; Poetry: Editorial by Robert Sullivan ; Airini Beautrais. Flow ; Nicole Hawkins. Māori dux ; Reihana Robinson. Terra nullius ; Kiri Piahana-Wong. Hiding ; Apirana Taylor. thank you ; pukana .

Wellington Regional Secondary Schools Kapa Haka Competition

On Thursday 2 July after many weeks and months of practicing, Wellington Secondary Schools will have their opportunity on stage to be selected to represent the region at the National Secondary Schools Kapa Haka Competition to be held at the Pettigrew Arena in Hawke’s Bay next July.

The regional event is being held at Te Rauparaha Arena in Porirua and Te Reo Irirangi Māori o Te Ūpoko o Te Ika are broadcasting the entire competition. Click here and scroll down to the Upoko o te Ika link to listen to the competition on line.

Kapa Haka
Unidentified Maori women in traditional kapa haka performance dress, including puipui and poi, location unknown. Whites Aviation Ltd :Photographs. Ref: WA-25309-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22633364

Our Māori Resource pages have some great resources if you are interested in waiata Māori and I have also included some titles on waiata and other Kapa Haka related topics.

Click here for a digital copy of Sir George Gray’s Waiata Māori collection Ko Nga Waiata Maori he mea kohikohi mai, i tera kaumatua i tera kuia, no ona haerenga, e mahi ki nga pito katoa a Aotea-roa. Because of the rarity of the Wellington City Libraries’ original copy, a digitisation process has allowed us to present the book in an electronic format. Note that the spelling and grammar used by the publisher has been retained in this online version. Some of the spellings used were written phonetically or are based on incorrect interpretations of a spoken word.

Click here to search our Waiata Database which is an index of waiata from sources held by Wellington City Libraries, including Sir Apirana Ngata’s Ngāa Mōteatea. This database is a work in progress, and in time we will also include the library’s collection of CD or DVD recordings of waiata.

Syndetics book coverNgā mōteatea : he maramara rere nō ngā waka maha / he mea kohikohi nā Sir Apirana Ngata = The songs : scattered pieces from many canoe areas / collected by Sir Apirana Ngata.

Syndetics book coverKia Rōnaki = The Māori performing arts / edited by Rachael Ka’ai-Mahuta, Tania Ka’ai & John Moorfield.
In the last thirty years there has been an explosion of interest in the Maori performing arts but until now there has been no general book written in English or Maori about the Maori performing arts by Maori authors and exponents of the various genres. This new work, brings together the expertise of a range of performance artists and academics, consolidating their knowledge into a comprehensive single volume that will be of relevance to all those interested in the Maori performing arts.

Syndetics book coverNgā tatangi a te whare karioi = That special place where uniquely Māori sounds are created / Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival, Tauranga Moana, Mātaatua.
“Nga Tatangi a Te Whare Karioi captures the diverse realities of iwi represented by kapa haka groups performing at Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival 2009. Festival chairman Selwyn Parata describes the book featuring selected groups and their performance compositions – as a ‘must-have’ for aspiring composers and those dedicated to te reo Maori and the Maori performing arts. This is a limited edition publication.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWaiata : Maori songs in history : an anthology / introduced and translated by Margaret Orbell. “In this new anthology Orbell places waiata of the nineteenth century in their social and political setting, conveying the poet’s responses to their people’s trauma.” (abridged back cover)

Syndetics book coverThe Maori action song : waiata a ringa, waiata kori, no whea tenei ahua hou? / Jennifer Shennan. “This book is a discussion of Maori action songs, the dance form which, from modest beginnings in the early decades of the twentieth century, has developed into what is effectively the national dance of New Zealand. Through many hundreds of compositions, the action song has become an important medium of communication for many Maori people. A number of the earliest action songs are remembered and performed as classics up to 60 years later. They include simple love ditties and notably the songs of proud farewell and the joyous sad welcomes to soldiers returning from both World Wars. Recent developments have taken the action song away from the simplicity of its earliest form with borrowed European melodies, to more sophisticated compositions including dramatic effects with interpolated haka rhythms. New gestures are devised to express a widening range of themes and ideas, and these are worked into the style which has become conventionalised. It is this process-the instinctive moulding of innovated movement into the aesthetically acceptable dance style-which makes absorbing study.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNgoingoi Pēwhairangi : an extraordinary life / Tania Ka’ai.
“This is a significant biography. Ngoingoi Pewhairangi was a loved and respected Maori leader who was born on the cusp of te ao kohatu (the old Maori world) and the beginning of some significant changes in contemporary Maori society, and who utilised knowledge from both worlds throughout her entire life. From Te Whanau-a-Ruataupare hapu at Tokomaru Bay, Ngoi dedicated her adult life to supporting these people and influencing their lives to ensure a better future for Maori society. She was passionate about people and the advancement of Maori society and demonstrated this through her involvement in a variety of initiatives from Maori education, Maori language, Maori performing and traditional arts, Maori politics and within her own whanau. Accompanied by a CD of music composed by Ngoingoi, this book is a celebration of Ngoi’s life through the testimonies of many people who knew her using their own words. The bilingual text allows people to come to know what a truly remarkable mother she was to so many people in Aotearoa/New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

“Nui Nui Rangatira”: Dr George Evans with author Helen Riddiford

2015 is a year of many anniversaries.

But this week there is a wonderful opportunity to upgrade your knowledge of Wellington history with the story of the arrival of the first New Zealand Company settlers and their impact upon tangata whenua – a huge change in the structure of life at Te Whanganui-a-Tara, 1840.

Today at 1 pm, Helen Riddiford will outline her story of the coming together of these two cultures as portrayed through her recently published book: A Blighted fame : George S. Evans, 1802-1868. (VUP, 2015)

Helen’s presentation:

index ‘Nui Nui Rangatira’: Dr George Evans, his role in the New Zealand Company and his Relationship with Māori”

Colonial founder ; the story of Hiakai and the creation of te reo Māori grammar book (London, 1837-38); accomplished speaker of the language; the unfolding legend of Ruhia Porutu, Thomas McKenzie & Dr Evans’ partially-built house (1840) ; defender of Māori under British law (1841) ; and other events.

In the recounting the story of George Evans, we discover unfolding snippets of Māori interaction and encounters with a new way of life amongst the New Zealand Company settlers. 2015 is also the 150 year anniversary of Wellington as the capital city of New Zealand This is a fine chance to hear and understand acoming together of two cultures and thebackground stories to the making of Wellington city.

Nau mai, haere mai ki tō tatou whare
Wellington City, Central Library
Friday 17 April, Ground Floor, 1 pm

Beautiful books

The illustrated history, Tangata Whenua stands as a colossus amongst this month’s selection of books, but there are other remarkable books such as the story of Richard Nunns and Māori music, and the very readable snippets of life from Witi Ihimaera. Local poet, Apirana Taylor publishes his latest collection of poetry and Hōne Sadler’s Ngāpuhi narrative (in te reo Māori) will be treasured by his people and all speakers of te reo. The Walters whānau have recorded the stories of wharenui of the motu in another beautifully illustrated book.

Syndetics book coverThe Healthy Country? : A History of Life & Death in New Zealand
“In this book, Alistair Woodward and Tony Blakely tell the extraordinary story of life and death in Aotearoa New Zealand from first Maori settlement to the 21st century. Did Maori or Europeans live longer in 1769? How did Pakeha New Zealanders become the healthiest, most long lived people on the face of the globe (and why did Maori not enjoy the same life expectancy)? What caused New Zealanders’ health and longevity to be surpassed by other nations in the late twentieth century?… ‘The Healthy Country?’ is important reading for anyone interested in the story of New Zealanders and a decisive intervention in debates about health, disease and medicine.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 1. Before Cook : the long history of human longevity
Chap. 2. Māori majority : the first hundred years after Cook
Chap. 4. Decline and recovery ; Māori from 1860-1940

Polynesian legends and other poems / by A. Stanley Sherratt ; edited by Mark Pirie ; introduction by Dr Michael O’Leary.

Syndetics book coverTe ara puoro : a journey into the world of Māori music / Richard Nunns with Allan Thomas.
“Te Ara Puoro tells the story of Richard Nunn’s remarkable journey; of how fragments of knowledge given by elders were pieced together through countless presentations and performances on marae the length and breadth of the country; of how the instruments were re-created and developed; and of how he subsequently mastered their playing. The book gathers together an enormous amount of the current knowledge about taonga puoro, and will undoubtedly be the most important written resource in existence on the subject. It also charts the many other paths that Richard has taken with the music, including the huge variety of recordings he has done, his sound-track work, and his playing in other genres, such as free jazz and classical”–Publisher website.

The Mangatū remedies report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Supreme Court directed Waitangi Tribunal hearing. In 1961, the Crown had purchased 8,522 acres of land in the Mangatū 1 block north of Gisborne for the establishment of a forest to prevent hill country erosion and downstream flooding. The Tribunal had earlier found that the Crown had breached the Treaty of Waitangi when it acquired this land, and in the current inquiry, four claimant groups – the Mangatū Incorporation, Te Aitanga a Māhaki and Affiliates, Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, and Te Whānau a Kai – sought binding recommendations relating to the Mangatū Crown forest licensed lands. The Tribunal strongly urged the applicants to reunite and return to negotiations with the Crown.”–Publisher information.

Koowhiti / editorial panel: Tanemahuta Gray, Merenia Gray, Jennifer Stevenson, Peter Cleave, Paul Moon and Linda Ashley.

Syndetics book coverMāori boy : a memoir of childhood / Witi Ihimaera.“This honest, stirring work tells of the family and community into which Ihimaera was born, of his early life in rural New Zealand, of family secrets, of facing anguish and challenges, and of laughter and love. As Ihimaera recounts the myths that formed his early imagination, he also reveals the experiences from real life that wriggle into his fiction. Alive with an inventive, stimulating narrative and vividly portrayed relatives, this memoir is engrossing, entertaining and moving, but, more than this, it is also a vital record of what it means to grow up Māori”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMarae : te tatau pounamu : a journey around New Zealand’s meeting houses / Muru, Robin & Sam Walters. “A documentation of and tribute to New Zealand’s wharenui, big and small … Includes detailed shots of their carvings, kōwhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event”–Publisher information.
“For three years Muru, Robin and Sam Walters visited this country’s marae to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house… this handsome book captures the huge variety of New Zealand’s original architecture”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPuna wai kōrero : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan.
“Two leading Māori scholars collect Māori poetic voices in English and let flow a wellspring of poetry. From both revered established writers as well as exciting new voices, the poems in Puna Wai Korero offer a broad picture of Maori poetry in English. The voices are many and diverse: confident, angry, traditional, respectful, experimental, despairing and full of hope, expressing a range of poetic techniques and the full scope of what it is to be Māori”–Publisher’s website.

Syndetics book coverTangata whenua : an illustrated history / Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris.
“Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Māori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers an overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverThe breathing tree : new poems / Apirana Taylor.
“This collection offers forty new poems from popular poet Apirana Taylor. Inspired by nature and mythology, he shifts his focus from the mundane to the mysterious”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPrendergast : legal villain? / Grant Morris.
“James Prendergast is the most infamous figure in New Zealand’s legal history, known mainly for his condemnation of the Treaty of Waitangi as “a simple nullity” in 1877. But during his lifetime Prendergast was a highly respected lawyer and judge. He was arguably New Zealand’s dominant legal professional from 1865 to 1899, and his good reputation remained intact until the 1980s, when the Treaty of Waitangi finally returned to the centre of New Zealand political life. The more the Treaty has been celebrated, the more Prendergast has been condemned. “–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPēwhairangi : Bay of Islands missions and Māori 1814 to 1845 / Angela Middleton.
“… It is the story of New Zealand’s first permanaent European settlement at Hoki and the church mission that it represented, and of the other mission communities subsequently established in the Bay of Islands, at Kerikeri, Paihia, Waimate and Te Puna. It is a story of Ngāpuhi and Pākehā engagement, as neighbours, over four decades.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverKo tautoro, te pito o tōku ao : a Ngāpuhi narrative / Hōne Sadler.
“Sadler illustrates the unbroken chain of Ngāpuhi sovereignty by looking in-depth at his own hapū of Ngāti Moerewa, Ngāti Rangi and Ngāi Tawake ki te Waokū of Tautoro and Matarāua. The narrative is told through weaving together karakia and whakapapa, histories and kōrero that have been part of the oral traditions of Ngāpuhi’s whānau, hapū and iwi and handed down through the generations on marae and other gathering places”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTurning the hearts of the children : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church / edited by Selwyn Kātene.
“History of Church of Latter-day Saints involvement with Māori in NZ, with chapters based on 12 early prominent Māori figures”–Publisher information. “…Mormons did not reject traditional Māori socio-cultural mores. They shared reverence for family and genealogy and were guided by visions and dreams”–back cover. Profiled: Hirini Whaanga, Raihi Ngāwaka, Whatahoro Jury, Ngāhuia Chase, Percy Going, Hōhepa Heperi, Te Rāwhiti Paerata, Stuart Meha, Wetekia Elkington, Sidney Christy, Pare Takana (Duncan), Tūrake Manuirirangi.

Aotearoa New Zealand social work ; vol. 24, no. 4 (Review ed., 2014)
p. 65. Spirituality and social work : introducing a spiritual dimension into social work education and practice by Carol Phillips.

Archaeology in New Zealand ; vol. 57, no. 4 (December 2014)
P. 199. New Zealand’s settlement date : the last word? (or at least the latest) by Garry Law.
An instant vote taken without warning, at the 2014 NZAA Conference requesting participants to nominate a single AD date “for the earliest settlement of New Zealand by ancestors of the Maori.” 51 votes were accepted.

New Zealand journal of educational studies ; vol. 49, no. 2 (2014)
p. 176. Researching identity with indigenous D/deaf youth by Anne Hynds, Susan Faircloth, Clint Green and Helen Jacob.
p. 205. Representing Māori youth voices in community education research by Joanna Kidman.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 48, no. 2 (October 2014)
p. 50. Solidarity across the ‘colour line’ : Māori representation in the Maoriland worker, 1910-1914 by Cybele Locke.
p. 119. A window for revisionism : presenting te Tiriti in the Primary school bulletins, 1957 by Rachael Bell.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 1 (2014)
p. 20. The problematic portraits of Pomare II by Keith Giles.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 3 (2014)
p. 5. William Swanson Read Bloomfield (1885-1968) ; was he the first architect with Māori ancestry? by Denys Oldham.
p. 17. Well off the beaten track ; the site of New Zealand’s first Roman Catholic mass by Robin Astridge.

Oral history in New Zealand ; vol. 26 (2014)
p. 31. Tuia te ao marama : oral histories with Māori mental health nurses by Maria baker, Tio Sewell & Hineroa Hakiaha.

Māori Boy: a conversation with Witi Ihimaera

witi
Last week, I had the great pleasure of attending an author talk with Witi Ihimaera about his latest book, Māori Boy, held at National Library. Māori Boy: a memoir of childhood is a recollection of the author’s early life growing up near Gisborne in the 1940s and 1950s. As a life-long fan of Ihimaera’s writing, I was really excited and interested to hear him speak about his experiences of writing the book and about some of the events and relationships in his childhood which inspired it. The event was incredibly well attended, creating a need for extra seats as well as more speakers; testifying to the popularity of this iconic New Zealand writer. The audience were also treated to a brief teaser video of Lee Tamahori’s upcoming film The Patriarch, which is based on Ihimaera’s well-loved novel Bulibasha. I was also lucky enough to get my shiny new copy of the book signed!

We have plenty of copies available here at the library:

Syndetics book coverMāori boy : a memoir of childhood / Witi Ihimaera.
Maori Boy: A Memoir of Childhood is the first volume of Witi Ihimaera’s enthralling memoir, packed with stories from the formative years of the bestselling author of Whale Rider and Pounamu, Pounamu. He tells of his early life in rural and small town New Zealand, of family secrets, of facing anguish and challenges, and of laughter and love.” (from randomhouse)

Tautohe, Tiriti, Tikanga – Māori recent picks

Wars and weapons figure strongly in this month’s books, but a wonderful reprint of essays by Roger Neich enriched with superb illustrations holds pride of place for me. Also included, a collection of poetry by Hinemoana Baker, and an interesting play Te Keni by Michalanne Forster along with the story of printer William Woon.

Syndetics book coverWaha = Mouth / Hinemoana Baker.
Hinemoana Baker is the “author of two collections of poetry, … edits the online journal of Whitireia New Zealand’s Creative Writing Programme, and co-edited the anthropology Kaupapa : New Zealand poets, World Issues… In 2009 she was the Arts Queensland Poet in Residence ; in 2010 she was one of 38 writers in residence at the University of Iowa International Writing Programme ; and in 2014 she is writer in residence at Victoria University in Wellington”– Inside cover.

Syndetics book coverBeyond the imperial frontier : the contest for colonial New Zealand / Vincent O’Malley.
“Beyond the Imperial Frontier is an exploration of the different ways Maori and Pakeha ‘fronted’ one another – the zones of contact and encounter – across the nineteenth century. Beginning with a pre-1840 era marked by significant cooperation, Vincent O’Malley details the emergence of a more competitive and conflicted post-Treaty world. As a collected work, these essays also chart the development of a leading New Zealand historian.” (Syndetics summary)

William Woon 1803-1858 : Wesleyan printer in Tonga and New Zealand / Gary A. M. Clover.
“The Wesleyan mission press played a supplementary but useful part…Woon’s [printings] helped to introduce a whole generation of Tongan and Maori scholars to the world of reading and writing which alone would have been enough to transform their societies into at least semi-literate ones. Because they were printed solely in the two indigenous languages, Woon was among those who were instrumental in putting Christian ideas and values, into the hands and minds of avid readers in both islands…His printing was therefore one key factor in the successful Christian evangelism of both lands”–[C J Parr, in, A missionary library]–inside back cover.

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Questions continue to emerge: Was it just? Was it right? Was Kereopa Te Rau even behind the murder? And who was Volkner – was he a spy or an innocent? In a personal quest, author Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Downfall : three New Zealand history plays / Michelanne Forster.
“Downfall offers an opportunity to look at the history of New Zealand through a dramatic lens. Te Keni explores the fraught relationship between Maori and Pakeha in the early colonial period. Larnach reveals the dynamics of the prominent family who established Larnach Castle in Dunedin. My Heart is Bathed in Blood examines the tragic implications of a relationship between two young medical students. Each play is introduced with an essay that provides historical context and performance history. Downfall is ideal for students and teachers of drama and for those with an interest in New Zealand’s rich heritage”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Te Keni is a story of Thomas Kendall, Hongi Hika, and Samuel Marsden. Much of the work was written during Peter Wells’ Ursula Bethell writing residency at the Unversity of Canterbury, 1993 — pp. 209-210.

Syndetics book coverMāori tales of love, war & mana / David Simmons.
“Maori Tales of Love War and Mana has been written after more than 60 years of research and field work with the author talking with local elders as well as working from the Otago Museum and Auckland War Memorial Museum (of which he was for a time Assistant Director) where he collected local traditions from throughout New Zealand, in places as widespread as the Far North, Fiordland and the Chatham Islands. More than 50 tales are related and include local versions of popular traditions and tribal history. The stories follow great Maori battles and migrations through New Zealand. The book is organised into Maori regions, including remote areas such as Fiordland and Chathams. Some of the tales have not been previously published; others given a local slant to more familiar traditions. Includes extensive references and indices. Illustrated with wood engravings by the Late E. Mervyn Taylor, leading artist of mid-20th century. David Simmons is a distinguished scholar and author of several popular books about Maori history and culture.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori weapons in pre-European New Zealand / Jeff Evans.
An introduction to the weapons that made up the armoury of tribes in pre-European New Zealand. Drawing on historical sources and contemporary expertise the author explains the manufacture, maintenance and use of each of the principal weapons: two handed weapons (including pouwhenua and tewatewha), patu and mere, spears (including huata and tokotoko), and other weapons (including hoeroa and oka).

Tradition and change in Māori and Pacific art : essays / by Roger Neich : edited by Chanel Clarke, Fuli Pereira and Nigel Prickett.
“This is Roger’s final gift to te ao M`qori, the Māori world. His impeccable scholarship, his skilled analysis, and his quiet sensitivity produced works of enduring value and excellence. For academics, he set a daunting standard ; to Māori and Pacific researchers, he offered genuine opportunity. He was generous, and humble, and he left us far too soon. E te Rangatira, moe mai ra”–Ngahuia Te Awekotuku (back page).

The Battle of Ōrākau : Māori veterans’ accounts : commemorating the 150th anniversary 1864-2014 / compiled and introduced by Robert Joseph and Paul Meredith.
“The Battle of Ōrākau was fought near Kihikihi from 31 March to 2 April 1864 by a contingent of approximately 300 Māori (including women and children) from Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Te Kohera, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāi Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Ngāti Whare, Patuheuheu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Rongowhakaata and Ngāti Maniapoto among other tribes”–Page 1.
Includes korero on Rewi Manga Maniapoto. Hitiri Te Paerata, Paitini Wi Tapeka, Te Huia Raureti, Winitana Tupotahi, Poupatate Te Huihi, Te Wairoa Piripi, Peita Kotuku, Te Putene Umanga / Te Rutene Te Uamairangi?, Harehare Atarea.

Syndetics book coverNew myths and old politics : the Waitangi Tribunal and the challenge of tradition / Tipene O’Regan.
“”Negotiating a claim before the Waitangi Tribunal can involve troubling challenges to an iwi’s legitimacy, sometimes from unexpected places. In this unique behind-the-scenes account of the negotiation of Ngai Tahu’s Waitangi Tribunal claim, Sir Tipene O’Regan describes what happened when claims of New Age mysticism attempted to undermine traditional whakapapa and academic scholarship”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Te tū hanga whare o Whetū = The rebuilding of Te Whetū o Te Rangi / Des Tatana Kahotea.
“”This is a photo-ethnography, a book that documents the rebuilding of a wharenui (meeting house). A project over a period from late 2006 that was planned, built and opened on December 20 2008 at Ngapeke, Tauranga. This is a Ngati Pukenga marae, an iwi of Mataatua waka origin. The original wharenui opened in 1915 was severely damaged by fire in September 2006. The people of the marae were determined to replace the wharenui with a new building complete with wharenui art. They undertook the creation of the wharenui art of kowhaiwhai, tukutuku and raranga whariki themselves and wood-carving was both commissioned and donated. This is a record of the activity that took place and the people who were involved. The book particularly shows some of the Maori customs associated with the re-building of a wharenui”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Remembering Parihaka

To acknowledge the village and the people of Parihaka, and to mourn the anniversary of the events which occurred there on November 5 1881, we have compiled a booklist of excellent Parihaka resources, including fiction, non-fiction and children’s books:

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka woman / Witi Ihimaera.
“There has never been a New Zealand novel quite like The Parihaka Woman. Richly imaginative and original, weaving together fact and fiction, it sets the remarkable story of Erenora against the historical background of the turbulent and compelling events that occurred in Parihaka during the 1870s and 1880s. Parihaka is the place Erenora calls home, a peaceful Taranaki settlement overcome by war and land confiscation. As her world is threatened, Erenora must find within herself the strength, courage and ingenuity to protect those whom she loves. And, like a Shakespearean heroine, she must change herself before she can take up her greatest challenge and save her exiled husband, Horitana. Surprising, inventive and deeply moving, The Parihaka Woman confirms Witi Ihimaera as one of New Zealand’s finest and most memorable storytellers.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGhosts of Parihaka / David Hair.
“It hasn’t been an easy time for Matiu Douglas, magical adept. One of his friends is now a ghost, his enemies have stolen the Treaty of Waitangi, he can’t date the girl he really likes and he keeps getting unwanted marriage proposals from a dangerous, centuries-old tohunga’s daughter. But when his best friend, Riki, is snatched into the ghost-world of Aotearoa during a school trip, Mat has to put all his other worries aside and act fast. For Riki vanished at Parihaka, scene of one of the darkest acts from New Zealand’s colonial past, and in Aotearoa such places are deadly dangerous” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAsk that mountain : the story of Parihaka / Dick Scott.
“Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand’s colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace.Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world’s first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers’ pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen’s highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly ‘dying race’, the Maori.Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka album : lest we forget / Rachel Buchanan.
“A photo album doesn’t tell the whole story of a family and this book doesn’t tell the whole story of Parihaka. Rather, it is a collection of snapshots, a patchwork quilt, a scrapbook, a mongrel record my own efforts to understand one of the most important and disturbing events in New Zealand history – the 1881 invasion of Parihaka – and its powerful, complicated legacy. Rachel Buchanan The Parihaka Album: Lest We Forget blends the personal and the historical. It tracks the author Rachel Buchanan’s discovery of her family’s links with Parihaka and her Maori and Pakeha ancestor’s roles in the early days of the city that is now Wellington.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWanderings with the Mãori prophets, Te Whiti & Tohu (with illustrations of each chief) : being reminiscences of a twelve months’ companionship with them, from their arrival in Christchurch in April 1882, until their return to Parihaka in March 1883 / by John P. Ward.
“Being Reminiscences Of A Twelve Months’ Companionship With Them, From Their Arrival In Christchurch In April 1882, Until Their Return To Parihaka In March, 1883.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRemember that November / written by Jennifer Beck ; illustrated by Lindy Fisher.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMaumahara ki tērā Nōema / nā Jennifer Beck rāua ko Lindy Fisher ; nā Kawata Teepa i whakamāori.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)