#MatarikiMash challenge #4

Welcome to another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • kura (school, red)
  • whai (follow, string game)
  • practice
  • season

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Te Tiriti talks at Central Library

On Friday 29 April Wellington City Libraries, in collaboration with Wellington Treaty Network, begins a series of three “Tiriti” talks at Central Library covering themes of past, present and future.

1
Hineteiwaiwa. Haeata Collective, 1990, Robyn Kahukiwa, artist : Mana Tiriti
Friday 29 April 12.30pm:
The series begins with stories of the local signatories to Te Tiriti within the rohe of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, April and May, 1840.
Mana Whenua – Honiana Love, Mark Teone, Kura Moeahu — describe whānau who put their marks to Henry Williams’ “treaty” sheet no. 8, April, 1840.

There will be stories of Kumutoto, Pipitea/Waiwhetu, and Piti-one – describing well-known identities, such as Te Puni, Wi Tako, and others less well-known, but whose life histories are important to us, ngā uri of those who made their hikoi to this rohe in 1820s-1840s.

2
Claudia Orange. ‘Treaty of Waitangi – Creating the Treaty of Waitangi’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 16-Nov-12
Licensed by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage for re-use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence.

Friday 6 May 12.30pm:
The theme of the second week is a contemporary issue: Clean Water — and illustrates local solutions for a global problem.
Ray Ahipene-Mercer was at the forefront of the drive for clean water, joining the Wellington Clean Water Campaign, 1984, and taking a claim to the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986. This claim was put on hold when Wellington citizens began to see the need for changes to the local sewage treatment. Concern for the water issues led to collaboration with Aila Taylor, (Motunui Claim) and other iwi, in raising awareness of nationwide issues of pollution.

3Image courtesy of wellington.govt.nz
Morrie Love will speak also – his theme: his experiences with indigenous freshwater fish – important tales so little known to many people of this rohe.

Friday 13/5 12.30pm:
The third week centres on the Pākehā engagement with the Treaty – describing a thirty year collective action by Project Waitangi/Wellington Treaty Network whose members were challenged by questions along the lines of: – “so what are you doing about the treaty”?
Speakers include Mary Haggie, Jeff Drane and Jen Margaret.

4
Nau mai, haere mai ki to tātou whare pukapuka : Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui

In conclusion:
Would you have voted for a flag like this? Kiwi iwi flag by Mere Drake (nee Wehipeihana)
5
This design acknowledges the unique place of Tangata Whenua and their partnership with Tangata Tiriti in the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and illustrates the following themes:
• A marriage contract of aroha, Tangata Tiriti signed on behalf of the Crown which enabled may peoples to come to New Zealand
• The beautiful colours of the rainbow represent the many cultures of New Zealand
• The weave represents integration of cultures
• Our links to the islands are also acknowledged and form a cross an important part of our heritage

Māoriland Festival

The Māoriland Film Festival kicks off in Otaki later this month and we think you will want to be there!! Running from 23-27 March, the festival is the largest indigenous film festival in the Southern Hemisphere and will feature films from the Marshall Islands, USA and Canada, while also showcasing Māori cinema from Aotearoa. You can see the list of feature films and the film schedule here and follow the festival blog here. My pick for the festival is Three Wise Cousins; check out the trailer below!

Well-known New Zealand films The Dark Horse and The Deadlands both featured in the 2015 Māoriland festival and are both available at the library:

The Dead LandsThe dead lands / a Matthew Metcalfe production ; a Toa Fraser film.
After his tribe is slaughtered through an act of treachery, Hongi, a Maori chieftain’s teenage son, must avenge his father’s murder in order to bring peace and honor to the souls of his loved ones. Vastly outnumbered by a band of villains, Hongi’s only hope is to pass through the feared and forbidden Dead Lands and forge an uneasy alliance with the mysterious Warrior, a ruthless fighter who has ruled the area for years.

The Dark HorseThe dark horse / Four Knights Film in association with The New Zealand Film Commission [and six others] present ; a film by James Napier Robertson.
The Dark Horse is an emotionally-charged and inspiring drama about a man who searches for the courage to lead, despite his own adversities – finding purpose and hope in passing on his gift to the children in his community.

Mahana

Mahana, a movie based on renowned author Witi Ihimaera’s much-loved book Bulisbasha, opens this week in cinemas and I am extremely excited to see it. Here’s the trailer, which is bound to get you excited to see it too:

It was first hinted at over a year ago (we told you about it here!) and it is so great to finally see it hitting cinemas.

If you want to read the book before you see the movie, we recommend you get in quick as it’s already proving popular! Place your reserves here:

Cover from SyndeticsBulibasha : king of the gypsies / Witi Ihimaera.
“Witi Ihimaera’s first novel for six years. Two patriarchs on the East Coast of New Zealand fight for the title of king, and their families are involved in conflict in sport and culture, and in the Golden Fleece contest. Simeon, a teenager, is caught in the middle of the struggle. The novel was written when Witi Ihimaera was Katherine Mansfield Fellow in Menton.” (Syndetics summary)

Also, another Ihimaera book which has been made into a world-famous film:

Syndetics book coverThe whale rider / Witi Ihimaera.
“Witi Ihimaera’s timeless story tells how the courage of one girl in standing against the tide of tradition enables her tribe to become reconnected with their ancestral life force. The Whale Rider has become one of Witi Ihimaera’s best-loved stories, capturing readers with its universal themes of conflict between generations and genders, respect for nature, family love and personal courage. Now the movie adaptation, Whale Rider, has brought the story to an international audience. This special edition of Ihimaera’s original novel includes a section of photos from the movie, a bonus for moviegoers and readers alike.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Aro VideoWhale rider [videorecording] / a film by Niki Caro.
“A contemporary story of love, rejection and triumph as a young Maori girl fights to fulfill a destiny her grandfather refuses to recognize.” (Library catalogue)

Ihimaera’s novel Nights in the Gardens of Spain was also developed into a feature film called Kawa (originally also titled Nights in the Gardens of Spain) and is most definitely worth a watch (and a read!). You can get them both out here:

Nights in the gardens of SpainNights in the gardens of Spain / Witi Ihimaera.
“A novel in which David Munro, the narrator, seems successful in marriage and in his career as a lecturer in film studies. He leads a double life, being married and gay, and the novel explores the resolution of the dilemma, the conflicting loyalties he has to deal with. The novel describes aspects of gay life, and the difficulties of developing relationships. It is very aware of the devastation of AIDS. The novel was written while Witi Ihimaera was Katherine Mansfield Fellow in Menton.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Aro VideoNights in the gardens of Spain [videorecording] / Cinco Cine Film Productions Ltd and Conbrio Media Ltd.
“This feature film adaptation of Witi Ihimaera’s iconic novel about David, a successful businessman who inexplicably estranges himself from his wife and children. Turns out, he is having an affair with a young male actor and is torn between living that life or the one that he is expected to live by his immediate and extended family. Complicating matters is his family’s deep roots in the Maori culture, which disapproves of homosexuality. For a while, the family suspects that David is seeing a woman. But one night, the actor unexpectedly shows up at David’s family compound, where his mother catches the two in a passionate embrace. She immediately banishes David from the compound, leading him to reveal the truth to all who are important to him.” (Library catalogue)

Toitū te whenua

There’s a diversity of kaupapa in this handful of books – organic gardening, pacifism of Parihaka, an outline of Māori participation in privatised military industry, stories from Tuhoe kaumatua and kuia, and a collection of research essays and thoughts on the home.

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“”Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on”–Back cover.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Whiti o Rongomai and the resistance of Parihaka / Danny Keenan.
“This is an account of the life and times of Te Whiti o Rongomai set against the politics and Crown policies of the nineteenth century. It traces the forces that shaped his life’s journey from Ngāmotu, where he was born, to his settling at Parihaka and his evolving sense of the injustices and disempowerment Māori experienced and his response to these. The book discusses the struggles Te Whiti had, as understood by some of his living relatives, against native policy of the time, and it gives insights into the motivations of Te Whiti and his actions. It explores the community at Parihaka, its resistance and the consequences of this and looks at Māori and government actions and responses up to the present day”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverA hidden economy : Māori in the privatised military industry / Maria Bargh.
“The Maori economy is often defined simply by the contributions of Maori in New Zealand in the areas of farming, fisheries and forestry. This book explores the ways that Maori in the privatised military industry contribute in monetary and non-monetary ways to the Maori economy. Workers in the privatised military industry very rarely, if ever, give interviews about their work or details about their pay. However, this book includes five interviews with Maori who have worked or are still working in the privatised military industry and explores how they articulate themselves as Maori in the industry, giving a glimpse at this secret world and how Maori operate in it.” (Syndetics summary)

Te ahi kaaroa : Rūātoki kaumātua narratives / Te Manatū Mātauranga o Tūhoe.
“”The Tuhoe Education Authority Te Manatu Matauranga o Tuhoe interviewed kuia and kaumatua in te reo Maori about their lives and experiences”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Ngā kaikōrero: George Thrupp, Rangipuke Tari, Tiwi Black, Patu Hale, Maureen Biddle, Kataraina Te Moana.

Syndetics book coverHome : here to stay / edited by Mere Kēpa, Marilyn McPherson and Linitā Manuʻatu.
“This is a collection of twelve academic essays that consider understandings of home and the impact of dominant societies on indigenous societies and their homes. The book covers home and language preservation, homelessness, retention of land, tobacco use in the home, loss of home through trauma and natural disaster, ageing and health, and the meaning of home. This is the third book in the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Edited Collections series.”–Publisher information.

Crimson / Marino Blank.

Syndetics book coverA Māori reference grammar / Ray Harlow.
“Based on a third-year university course Ray Harlow taught for a number of years, this grammar reference book is intended for people whose knowledge of Māori is at that level or higher – advanced learners, native speakers and teachers of Māori. The book provides explanations and examples of all the important sentence types of modern Māori. It guides readers progressively from the simple to the more complicated, starting with words and particles, proceeding through simple clauses and sentences to transformations of these and to complex sentences with elaborate internal structure”–Publisher information.

Talking about the Treaty

Display stand at the Takapuna LibraryTalk Treaty : Kōrerotia Te Tiriti is a display which features series of short video clips of well-known New Zealanders sharing their views about the Treaty of Waitangi and its implications.
This will be available in the Central, Miramar and Tawa libraries from 1 February, and Cummings Park branch from 9th February. Those stands will then travel to Kaori, Johnsonville and Newtown libraries in Mid March.
Topics covered include identity, te reo, coming to a greater understanding (between Māori and Pakeha), and cultural differences.
More info.

Postcards, urupa, travelling taonga

Two interesting books on the history of the New Zealand postcard have interesting examples of early Māori themed portraits and scenes. Then there is the inside story on Tariana Turia, and a biased spin on the activities of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata

Syndetics book coverCrossing the floor : the story of Tariana Turia / Helen Leahy.
“This biography of Tariana Turia sees family members, iwi leaders, social justice advocates and politicians share their experiences of this remarkable woman. While parliament was not originally part of her life plan, Tariana Turia was involved in many community initiatives. A turning point came in 1995, when Tariana’s leadership was evident in the reoccupation of Pakaitore. Here was a woman with the courage to care, the determination to speak up and a deep commitment to whānau. Inevitably, she was invited to stand in the 1996 general election. In her eighteen years as an MP, she advanced thinking in the disability area, advocated for tobacco reform and spoke out about sexual abuse, violence and racism. She also led the Whānau Ora initiative. In 2004, she crossed the floor, leading to the birth of the Māori Party”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverKo Ngā Takahanga i a Ārihi i Te Ao Mīharo / Lewis Carroll ; nā John Tenniel i whakaahua; nā Tom Roa i whakamāori.He ingoa karangaranga a Lewis Carroll: Ko Charles Lutwidge Dodgson te ingoa tuturu. He kaikauwhau i te Pangarau i Christ Church, Oxford. — Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford.

Syndetics book coverUnearthly landscapes : New Zealand’s early cemeteries, churchyards and urupā / Stephen Deed.
“… Immigrants brought with them a range of burial traditions, and of course Maori, already long established, had their own rituals. Over time, the various customs borrowed from one another to form a uniquely New Zealand way. In this beautifully written and illustrated book, Stephen Deed sets out to reconnect the historic cemeteries we see today with the history of this country and its people.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTell you what : great New Zealand nonfiction 2015 / edited by Jolisa Gracewood & Susanna Andrew.
“A fantastic collection of recent nonfiction essays, Tell You What contains live, wild, true stories from contemporary New Zealand. On the web and the wireless, in magazines and journals, at prizegivings and powhiri, New Zealanders are writing about the world. Essays and articles, speeches and submissions, tweets and travelogues–this book collects some of New Zealand’s best nonfiction from the past year into one anthology. Featuring New Zealand writers such as Steve Braunias, Lara Strongman, Eleanor Catton, and Tina Makereti, it explores a range of subjects, from mountain climbing and family secrets to cannibal snails and dangerous swims.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSend me a postcard : New Zealand postcards and the story they tell / William Main.
“The first New Zealand picture postcards were published in 1897, and quickly established themselves as an enduring and popular part of our visual culture. In the early part of the 20th century sending postcards snowballed into a craze which had few precedents (it is estimated that 7.5 million postcards were sent through the mail in 1909) … This charming and nostalgic collection of postcards is popular history at its best, and will have wide appeal. The cards are graphically fascinating, while the story they tell provides an intriguing view of life in New Zealand in the last century.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPost marks : the way we were : early New Zealand postcards, 1897-1922 / Leo Haks, Colleen Dallimore & Alan Jackson.
The way we were between 1897-1922 is revealed in more than 500 postcards that highlight New Zealand’s pioneer beginnings and the development of a unique cultural identity.

Tracking travelling taonga : a narrative review of how Māori items got to London from 1798, to Salem in 1802, 1807 and 1812, and elsewhere up to 1840 / by Rhys Richards. Machine-generated contents note: A French Visit to North Cape on 11 March 1793 — Lieutenant-Governor King from Norfolk Island to Muriwhenua in 1793 — The Fancy Trading for spars at Waihou (Thames) in 1795 — Mathew Flinders’ Tiki in 1795 — Sealers, Early Whalers and Spar Traders — American Traders to China — How Daniel Ward’s Donations Reached Salem in 1802 — The Donations of John Fitzpatrick Jeffrie in 1803 — The Donations of Captain William Richardson in 1807 — The Donations of Captain William Putnam Richardson in 1812 — Pacific Sealskins, Sandalwood and Beche de Mer — Other Early Taonga in American Collections — The Russians at Queen Charlotte Sound in 1820 — The Early Missionaries: Kendall and Marsden — The British Navy’s Search for Spars 1820-21 — Muskets for Preserved Heads from 1810 to 1840 — The French Collectors from 1824 to 1840 — Taonga in Other European Museums — Sperm Whalers from 1820 to 1840 — Six British Collectors of Taonga, 1820 to 1840 — The Three Maori Cloaks Donated by Mr C. Pettet — The Flax Trade from 1828 to 1833 — The Global Travels of the Mokomokai Daniel Aborn donated in 1831 — Taonga from the South Island — Remaining British Collections 1820 to 1840 — The United States Exploring Expedition in 1840 — Lost Provenances — Retrospect: The Collecting of Taonga before 1840.

Of Paekakariki : poetry, prose, pictures / collected by Sylvia Bagnall ; foreword by Sir John Trimmer.
“”Poetry, stories and artwork by people with a connection to Paekakariki”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Two great New Zealanders : the wisdom of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata / John Robinson.

John Miller – in conversation about his historic photographs of the Māori Land March

jm

Photographer John Miller with one of his photographs of the Māori Land March when it arrived in Wellington on October 13 1975. John was photographed at Te Unga Waka Marae in Auckland, at the commemorations of the 40th anniversary of the March in September 2015. Credit: John Miller

Acclaimed documentary photographer John Miller (Ngāpuhi) has documented social and political dissent and cultural events for more than four decades.  John photographed the Wellington section of the 1975 Māori Land March; from Porirua to its arrival at Parliament grounds.  The photographs have become well-known following their reproduction in books, exhibitions and school resources. In this session, John will talk with Paul Diamond about his photographs of the Māori Land March, and his involvement with the march organisers, Te Roopu o te Matakite.

A Wellington City Libraries talk, organised in partnership with the National Library, as part of the Turnbull Gallery exhibition, ‘Not one more acre’: The Māori Land March 40 years on.

Supported by LIANZA Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui regional group.

When: 12.30-1.30pm, Wednesday 21 October
Where: Ground floor, Wellington Central Library
Cost: Free

lm

The Māori Land March on the Wellington motorway, October 13 1975.
Credit: John Miller

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina : a biography of Whina Cooper / Michael King.

Syndetics book coverRaupatu : the confiscation of Māori land / edited by Richard Boast and Richard S. Hill.

Not One More Acre: A Conversation with Ans Westra at the Central Library

Ans Westra Poster6smallb

This October marks the 40th anniversary of the 1975 Māori Land March – when Dame Whina Cooper lead marchers to Parliament to protest the loss of Māori lands. “Not One More Acre of Māori Land” became the catch-cry of the marchers, who left Te Hāpua in the far north on 14 September as a group numbering no more than 50, and eventually reached Wellington on 13 October as a powerful hikoi numbering at over 5000.

Iconic photographer Ans Westra captured this event and on Tuesday 6 October Wellington Central Library will be hosting a talk with this renowned and well-loved photographer, who will describe her experience of attending and photographing the historic march. From Thursday 1st October there will also be an exhibition of contact sheet prints of Ans Westra’s photographs of the arrival of the march in Wellington on 13 October 1975.

A Conversation with Ans Westra
Tuesday 6 October at 12.30pm
2nd floor, Central Library

Syndetics book coverWashday at the pa / photographs by Ans Westra ; with text by Mark Amery.
Washday at the pa, by New Zealand premier photographers Ans Westra, was first published as a photo-story booklet in 1964 by the Department of Education for use in Primary Schools, but all 38,000 copies were withdrawn following a campaign by the Maori Women’s Welfare League that it would have a ‘detrimental effect’ on Maori people – and that the living conditions portrayed within the book were atypical. A second edition of the booklet was published the same years with some images omitted. This edition is a selection of these two editions together with photographs of the washday family taken in 1988, and includes essays by arts critic, journalist and broadcaster Mark Amery detailing the controversy and background of Washday at the pa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNga tau ki muri = Our future / Ans Westra.
“This timely and visionary new book includes 137 Westra photographs of the New Zealand landscape, with text contributions from Hone Tuwhare, Russel Norman, Brian Turner, David Eggleton and David Lange, who wrote a short piece for Ans as part of an unrealised book project in 1987. Well known for her iconic black and white documentation of Maori culture, Ans Westra is also known for her colour works, which show concern for New Zealand’s destiny, “an island exploited by various waves of settlement”. Shot with Ans’ trusty Rolleiflex camera, the sometimes damning images in Our Future have been made over the last 20 years. “The purpose of the book is to give a directive to the country, an awareness of things changed and lost within its short history. If we don’t plan for the long term and keep taking stop-gap measures, we leave very little behind. Instead of becoming like the rest of the world, this beautiful place should become a shining example of hope for survival in a newly balanced environment.” –Ans Westra.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina [videorecording] : mother of the nation.
“The autobiography of Maori land activist Dame Whina Cooper filmed two years before she died. Born in an earth-floor whare she became a teacher, gum digger, rugby coach, midwife, a tribal leader, president of Maori Women’s Welfare League and controversial leader of the Maori Land March. Who organized her first public protest at the age of 18.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHandboek : Ans Westra photographs / [exhibition curator and coordinator, Luit Bieringa ; texts, Cushla Parekowhai [et. al]].

Ans Westra [videorecording] : private journeys/public signposts / director, Luit Bieringa ; producer, Jan Bieringa.
New Zealand photographer, Ans Westra, talks about her career.

Missionaries, education, arts, media, politics : as usual a broad range of subjects touching on Te Ao Māori.

Syndetics book coverMāori art : history, architecture, landscape and theory / Rangihiroa Panoho ; with photographs by Mark Adams & Haruhiko Sameshima.
“Up until now books on Maori art have described the work as either traditional (carving, weaving, painting) or contemporary, work produced post-1950s. This book presents a unique focus on Maori art by exploring the connection between the traditional and contemporary, and the place of Maori art within an international context. Maori Art provides a framework for looking at Maori art in a new way and fills a gap in Maori art history – while there are myriad surveys of Maori art there is currently very little critical writing on Maori art and artists”….(Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby : not here by chance / Jeff Evans.
“This biography of Heke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby brings together the varied life experiences that have made Hec Busby the master waka builder, waka expert, celestial navigator and highly regarded Te Rarawa elder that he is today. He is one of the few active waka taua builders and is responsible for the completion of more than a dozen of these waka for iwi around the country… His entrepreneurial and leadership skills along with his tribal and tikanga knowledge have led to his involvement in iwi activities as well as in organising Waitangi commemorations, kapa haka, ocean-going voyages, and waka wananga to pass on his knowledge to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe good doctor : breaking the rules, making a difference / Lance O’Sullivan with Margie Thomson.
“Lance O’Sullivan is a man on a mission. Raised in Auckland by a solo mother, he had a modest upbringing typical of the time, if one chequered with difficulties. After being expelled from two schools, Lance could have gone off the rails. Instead, he found his way at Hato Petera College, connecting with his Māori ancestry, and going on to study medicine… For his work, Lance has been acknowledged as a Sir Peter Blake Emerging Leader, Public Health Champion, Māori of the Year and, most recently, Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year. Passionate, brave and free-thinking, Lance stood up when no one else would…”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTauira : Māori methods of learning and teaching / Joan Metge.Based on extensive interviews, this book offers a window on a mid-twentieth-century rural Māori world as described by those who grew up there. Metge’s work tackles important questions about Māori teaching and learning of this period. What was the role of whānau and hapū, household and marae, kaumātua and siblings, work and play? How much learning was practical and how much by teaching?”–Publisher information. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: Chapter 1: Voices from the Past — Chapter 2: Learning as Part of Living — Chapter 3: Teaching and Learning — Chapter 4: Spirituality and Values — Chapter 5: Learning in Maturity as Part of Living — Chapter 6: Storehouses of Knowledge — Chapter 7: Wānanga — Chapter 8: Storytelling — Chapter 9: Learning in the School System — Chapter 10: Educational Practices and Principles.

Syndetics book coverAt the margin of Empire : John Webster and Hokianga, 1841-1900 / Jennifer Ashton.
“Born in Scotland in 1818, John Webster came in New Zealand via Australia in 1841 after narrowly escaping death in the outback following a violent encounter with a group of Aboriginal men. He spent most of the rest of his life in the Hokianga region, carving out a fortune as the region’s leading timber trader and cultivating connections with the leading political figures of the day… Webster was also engaged with Pākehā and the Crown – friends with Frederick Maning, visited by George Grey, Richard Seddon and others… Ashton argues that through his daily interactions, Webster helped slowly shift the balance of power in the North: the credit that he extended to his customers and kin saw them selling land to pay debts, helping push Māori into economic dependence”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverEntanglements of empire : missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body / Tony Ballantyne.
“The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. ENTANGLEMENTS OF EMPIRE is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period… Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality and missionaries found it was difficult to maintain their own practices because of their dependence on Maori chiefly patrons as well as the material constraints and social conflicts. ….” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPanguru and the city : kāinga tahi, kāinga rua : an urban migration history / Melissa Matutina Williams.
“Travelling from Hokianga to Auckland in the middle decades of the twentieth century, the people of Panguru established themselves in the workplaces, suburbs, churches and schools of the city. Melissa Matutina Williams writes from the heart of these communities. The daughter of a Panguru family growing up in Auckland, she writes a perceptive account of urban migration through the stories of the Panguru migrants. Through these vibrant oral narratives, the history of Maori migration is relocated to the tribal and whanau context in which it occurred. For the people of Panguru, migration was seldom viewed as a one-way journey of new beginnings; it was experienced as a lifelong process of developing a ‘co-existent home place’ for themselves and future generations. Dreams of a brighter future drew on the cultural foundations of a tribal homeland and past. PANGURU AND THE CITY: HE KAINGA RUA traces their negotiations with people and places, from Auckland’s inner-city boarding houses, places of worship and dance halls to workplaces and Maori Affairs’ homes in the suburbs. It is a history that will resonate with Maori from all tribal areas who shared in the quiet task of working against state policies of assimilation, the economic challenges of the 1970s and neoliberal policies of the 1980s in order to develop dynamic Maori community sites and networks which often remained invisible in the cities of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

The brown book : Māori in screen production / written by Dr. Ella Henry and Melissa Wikaire. Contents include: Origins of the Brown Book ; Māori and the screen industry ; working with Māori in screen production ;
Appendices: Māori society ; an overview ; Ngā Aho Whakaari executive members ; Māori production companies ‘ Māori iwi radio stations ‘ pan-tribal organisations ; screen industry organisations ; television broadcasters.

Māori carving : the art of recording Māori history / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“This photograph-rich book shows and describes the process of carving, covering the types of materials and tools used, the carving strokes and surface patterns and different regional styles. It shows the range of items carved from meeting houses to musical instruments, waka or canoes, storehouses, weapons and ceremonial items, such as boxes and staffs, and gives detailed information on the carving of wharenui or meeting houses – the epitome of the carver’s art. Information is given on how to read and understand a carving, looking in depth at parts of carvings and what to look for in elements such as the head, arms and hands of figures and the surface patterns used. The patterns and body styles are described and accompanied by detailed photographs that make identification of the elements easy. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maōri culture. The others are: Geothermal Treasures: Māori Living with Heat and Steam; Māori Weaving: The Art of Creating Māori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Māori Culture”–Publisher information.

Māori weaving : the art of creating Māori textiles / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Since their ancestors arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand and discovered the useful properties of harakeke (New Zealand flax), Maori have used flax leaves to create baskets, mats, housing materials, clothing and cords, ropes and fishing nets. In weaving and the patterns used, Maori record their histories and stories, passing on their culture, genealogy, values and beliefs, weaving together people and communities”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Marae : the heart of Māori culture / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“”Step-by-step guide to a powhiri, or welcome ceremony, showing and describing what happens, the people involved, what they do, and the values and understandings underpinning the ceremony. There is also a close look at the outside and inside of a wharenui, or meeting house, showing each of the elements and features that make it up. Maori cultural concepts are explained and discussed and a glossary of Maori terms is provided”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Geothermal treasures : Māori living with heat and steam / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Natural geothermal phenomena – geysers, hot springs and mud pools – have drawn people to the thermal region of New Zealand for years. Locals and tourists are captivated by the beauty and magic of bubbling mud, steam and hot water gushing from the earth. New Zealand’s world-class geothermal resource is a source of energy, a tourist attraction and a treasure of great historical, cultural, spiritual and economic importance for Maori. In this book, Maori traditional stories, understandings and history stand alongside geothermal science in an exploration of the thermal phenomena of the Volcanic Plateau. Beautiful photographs show the hot pools, rising steam, geysers, bubbling mud and thermal formations that visitors see, and the text provides information about the natural history of the area, its formation and its significance to Maori. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maori culture. The others are: Maori Carving: The Art of Preserving Maori History; Maori Weaving: The Art of Creating Maori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Maori Culture”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Lives of colonial objectives edited by Annabel Cooper, Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla. Otago University Press, 2015.
p. 20. Intimate immensity : a pūtorino in the Peabody Essex Museum by Lucy Mackintosh.
p. 27. Te Haupapa by Pāoria Tapsell
p. 35. Voyaging taonga : the Kīngi tauihi by Kelvin Day.
p. 110. Retrieved from oblivion? Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitaake and the photographic object by Ruth Harvey.
p. 117. ‘A sparrow alone upon the house top’ : the Te Pihoihoi Press by Lachy Paterson.
p. 122. He rau mahara : te wananga ledger by Migoto Eria.
p. 129. Minute books : an integral part of the Māori Land Court by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 134. A road into Te Urewera by Annabel Cooper.
p. 170. Te Tokotoko by Megan Pōtiki.
p. 206. Katherine Mansfield’s hei tiki by Jane Stafford.
p. 212. Te pai o ngā āhua : the visitors’ books at the Lindauer Art Gallery by Roger Blackley.
p. 219. Toko toru tapu : a tale of four churches by Damian Skinner,
p. 231. Māori monument or Pākehā propaganda? the memorial to Keepa Te Rangihiwinui, Whanganui by Ewan Morris.
p. 253. ‘Pōua’s cloak’ : the Haberield family kahu kiwi by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 311. Aferword : ther wharenui Mataatua, and some thoughts about things by Conal McCarthy and Jonathan Mane-Wheoki.

New Zealand government and politics edited by Janine Hayward. 6th ed. OUP, 2015.
p. 4. Māori political history 1860-1960 by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 84. Marxism by Evan Te Ahu Poata-Smith.
p. 240. The Māori Party by Morgan Godfery.
p. 300. The Māori seats by Maria Bargh.
p. 511. Youth engagement by Veronica M. H. Tawhai.

Coutts, Brent and Nicholas Fitness. Protest in New Zealand. Pearson, 2013.
p. 83. Maori resistance to military service.
p. 171. Maori feminist issues

Overland ; issue 219 (Winter,2015)
Features: Anton Blank. Change is the only constant (on gay role models) ; Catriona MacLennan. The ethics of defence (layers and rape trials) ; Fiction: Tina Makereti. Monster ; Poetry: Editorial by Robert Sullivan ; Airini Beautrais. Flow ; Nicole Hawkins. Māori dux ; Reihana Robinson. Terra nullius ; Kiri Piahana-Wong. Hiding ; Apirana Taylor. thank you ; pukana .