Remembering Jonathan Mane-Wheoki

Artwork at entrance to Central LibraryA memorial is currently underway which remembers a well known Wellington figure Jonathan Mane-Wheoki. The project includes NZ artist Shannon Novak installing a small artwork in 10 locations around Wellington – 10 locations Jonathan frequented and supported. Wellington Central Library was identified as one of the locations, and the artwork is now installed on a glass panel in the Ground floor entrance area. The installation is called “Pieces at an Exhibition” (named after his favourite musical piece).

Jonathan Ngarimu Mane-Wheoki CNZM (8 December 1943 – 10 October 2014) was a New Zealand art historian, academic, and curator. Of Ngāpuhi, Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī and English descent, he was a pioneer in the study of contemporary Māori and Pacific art history. Jonathan invested much of his time and energy into the arts community in Wellington, including a stint as Director of Art and Collection services at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in 2004.

The library also has available a copy of Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker, which was recently launched by Victoria University Press.

Dr George S Evans : a life

Recently I breathed in the gentle gentility of the Wellington Club, The Terrace, whilst held in awe of Helen Riddiford’s meticulous and deeply researched account of the New Zealand Company’s finest member, Dr George Samuel Evans.

geo1By evening’s end, there were surely more than the just the two of us who would attest to his right to be named Wellington’s founding father, – a man who stood tall on the principles and the application of the Company’s constitution and held a desire to include tangata whenua in te ao hurihuri, / an evolving new life. In the words of one of our two official languages – here was a man truly worthy of the description: he kōtuku rerenga tahi.

For all the sentiments expressed above – how many people , today, remember any details of this man who gave his name to that inner bay (Evans’s / Evans Bay) and whose contribution to the settlement placed him second only to Colonel Wakefield, in his roles, which included that of chief judicial authority for the new colony.

When Edward Gibbon Wakefield accompanied Lord Durham to Canada, it was Dr Evans who stepped forward to place his hand firmly on the tiller of the colonial ship.

But who was this man? George Evans grew up in a household where civil and religious liberty was embraced. He was a brilliant scholar who excelled in Latin, Greek and Hebrew – His later work spanned the fields of education, judiciary and journalism. In 1928 he became, briefly, headmaster of Mill Hill School, London.

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(Source: School House at Mill Hill School : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mill_Hill_School)

It was here that he met school matron Mrs Riddiford, whose husband passed away in 1829. George and Harriet married, 16 January 1930, and George became the stepfather of Amelia (13 years) and Daniel (16 years) – he, Daniel, who was to become the founder of the Riddiford farming dynasty at Orongorongo and the stations around the Wairarapa coast of New Zealand.

There is so much detail of Evans’ life within the pages of this book. There’s the interesting story of his involvement with Nayti and Hiakai, two passengers on the Mississippi who became stranded at Le Havre, were rescued by the New Zealand Association and provided with lodgings by Wakefield and Evans, in the 1830s. With Hiakai’s help George Evans was introduced to Māori customs and reo. He began a grammar of Te Reo Māori, which was completed in 1839, but never officially published. Wellington City Central Library holds a copy of this Manuscript of a Maori grammar.

The top view stretches across Thorndon Flat with Dr Evans’ house on the left, a range of early houses and businesses along the waterfront and on the right, Colonel William Wakefield’s house with flagpole.

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(Source: Brees, Samuel Charles, 1810-1865 :Pictorial Illustrations of New Zealand. London, John Williams and Co., Library of Arts, 141, Strand, 1847.. Ref: PUBL-0020-22. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22816178)

Dr Evans fulfilled a designated role as advocate for Māori in all legal disputes – with varying degrees of success. Helen’s easy- read documentation of Dr Evans life and work in the new colony makes this book an absolute must for those of us mindful of the view – that you must first understand and embrace the past in order to move forward.

The study of the settlement of Wellington is a very complex exercise – but – don’t be confined only to those official publications — the reports and commissions, and records of deeds of release – Here lies, within these pages, the flavour of that era. This is a far more interesting journey by way of Helen’s archival research and her detailed account of Dr Evans work.

Dr Evans returned to England, 1846-52, and was dealt to harshly by the Company, in clearing the debts on his town and country sections in Wellington. It was an example of Wakefield’s ‘ability’ to turn against his closest allies.

George Evans and Harriet moved to Melbourne, 1853. He planned to undertake legal work but also began working with the Melbourne Morning Herald. He later gained a seat in the legislative assembly. His journalistic output was legendary. George and Harriet returned to New Zealand, 1865, but Harriet died 31 March 1866, and Dr Evans’ death followed in 1868.

In the words of Helen Riddiford “In the colonies he was head and shoulders above many of his peers in education and ability. He operated within an influential network of men, but was always independent in his views, which isolated him from many of his contemporaries. He was viewed as a ‘singular character’ a gentleman almost unique in this setting. His many visionary ideas were handicapped by a volatile temperament and principles that were compromised by circumstances, an unpredictable man of reckless courage whose steadfast commitment to the creation and success of Wellington was fully acknowledged after his death. Amongst others, The Independent noted that he was ‘one of the founders, if not the real founder of this colony. There is scarcely an official document of the period in which [his] name is not conspicuous”.

Here was a man truly worthy of the title bestowed by his Māori friends – Nui, Nui Rangatira

New books in our Maori collection

In this selection we have another beautiful art book – Artefacts of Encounter – which begins with stories of artefacts collected during Cook’s three voyages, followed by examples of colonial collecting and museum histories.

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania. … The collection includes some 100 artefacts dating from Cook’s first voyage. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Syndetics summary)

Image from Huia PublishingThe struggle for Māori fishing rights : te ika a Māori / Brian Bargh.
“Maori fishing rights were ignored by the Crown from the time the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840. Although guaranteed by the Treaty, Maori struggled to re-establish these rights until the 1980s after years of argument in the courts. Four pou, or pillars of support, significantly assisted in the recognition and eventual recovery of Maori fishing rights: the Treaty of Waitangi; the courts; the Waitangi Tribunal and the resilience and tenacity of Maori people, who never gave up fighting for what was right.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWomen of the Catlins : life in the deep south / edited by Diana Noonan ; photography by Cris Antona.
“A haunting, off-the-beaten-track destination, the little-known Catlins region of New Zealand is as mysterious today as it ever was. In this first in-depth look at the lives of its inhabitants, award-winning writer Diana Noonan and photographer Cris Antona collaborate to capture the thoughts and feelings of 26 women from this remote outpost. As the subjects speak for themselves on topics as diverse as family, work, isolation and their relationship with the environment, there is, at last, an opportunity for readers to enter into the heart of this rugged, unknown landscape where few venture and only the strongest make it home.” (Syndetics summary) Includes lives of: Rona Williamson (Ngāi Tahu) ; Heni Landreth (Ngāti Porou) ; Liz Cairns (Ngāpuhi), ; Nikeisha Clarke (Ngāi Tahu)

Te herenga reo : indigenous storytellers, Matariki, 2015 / compiled and curated by Te Herenga Reo Press for Te Herenga Reo Trust.
Contributors: Tama Waipara, Rob Ruha, Marama Davidson, Cilla Ruha, Michelle Ngamoki, Dayle Takitimu.

Syndetics book coverKa ngaro te reo : Maori language under siege in the nineteenth century / Paul Moon
“Ka ngaro te reo, ka ngaro taua, pera i te ngaro o te moa. If the language be lost, man will be lost, as dead as the moa. In 1800, te reo Maori was the only language spoken in New Zealand. By 1899, it was on the verge of disappearing altogether. In Ka Ngaro Te Reo, Paul Moon traces the spiralling decline of the language during an era of prolonged colonisation that saw political, economic, cultural and linguistic power shifting steadily into the hands of the European core…” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPerforming indigenous culture on stage and screen : a harmony of frenzy / Marianne Schultz.
“Examining corporeal expressions of indigenousness from an historical perspective, this book highlights the development of cultural hybridity in New Zealand via the popular performing arts, contributing new understandings of racial, ethnic, and gender identities through performance. The author offers an insightful and welcome examination of New Zealand performing arts via case studies of drama, music, and dance, performed both domestically and internationally.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe first migration : Māori origins 3000BC – AD1450 / Atholl Anderson.
“Thousands of years ago migrants from South China began the journey that took their descendants through the Pacific to the southernmost islands of Polynesia. Atholl Anderson’s … synthesis of research and tradition charts this epic journey of New Zealand’s first human inhabitants. Taken from … Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History this Text weaves together evidence from numerous sources: oral traditions, archaeology, genetics, linguistics, ethnography, historical observations, palaeoecology, climate change and more.” (Syndetics summary)

#MatarikiMash # 6!

It’s time for another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • noho (sit/stay)
  • whānau (family)
  • watch
  • stand

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

#MatarikiMash challenge #4

Welcome to another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • kura (school, red)
  • whai (follow, string game)
  • practice
  • season

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Te Tiriti talks at Central Library

On Friday 29 April Wellington City Libraries, in collaboration with Wellington Treaty Network, begins a series of three “Tiriti” talks at Central Library covering themes of past, present and future.

1
Hineteiwaiwa. Haeata Collective, 1990, Robyn Kahukiwa, artist : Mana Tiriti
Friday 29 April 12.30pm:
The series begins with stories of the local signatories to Te Tiriti within the rohe of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, April and May, 1840.
Mana Whenua – Honiana Love, Mark Teone, Kura Moeahu — describe whānau who put their marks to Henry Williams’ “treaty” sheet no. 8, April, 1840.

There will be stories of Kumutoto, Pipitea/Waiwhetu, and Piti-one – describing well-known identities, such as Te Puni, Wi Tako, and others less well-known, but whose life histories are important to us, ngā uri of those who made their hikoi to this rohe in 1820s-1840s.

2
Claudia Orange. ‘Treaty of Waitangi – Creating the Treaty of Waitangi’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 16-Nov-12
Licensed by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage for re-use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence.

Friday 6 May 12.30pm:
The theme of the second week is a contemporary issue: Clean Water — and illustrates local solutions for a global problem.
Ray Ahipene-Mercer was at the forefront of the drive for clean water, joining the Wellington Clean Water Campaign, 1984, and taking a claim to the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986. This claim was put on hold when Wellington citizens began to see the need for changes to the local sewage treatment. Concern for the water issues led to collaboration with Aila Taylor, (Motunui Claim) and other iwi, in raising awareness of nationwide issues of pollution.

3Image courtesy of wellington.govt.nz
Morrie Love will speak also – his theme: his experiences with indigenous freshwater fish – important tales so little known to many people of this rohe.

Friday 13/5 12.30pm:
The third week centres on the Pākehā engagement with the Treaty – describing a thirty year collective action by Project Waitangi/Wellington Treaty Network whose members were challenged by questions along the lines of: – “so what are you doing about the treaty”?
Speakers include Mary Haggie, Jeff Drane and Jen Margaret.

4
Nau mai, haere mai ki to tātou whare pukapuka : Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui

In conclusion:
Would you have voted for a flag like this? Kiwi iwi flag by Mere Drake (nee Wehipeihana)
5
This design acknowledges the unique place of Tangata Whenua and their partnership with Tangata Tiriti in the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and illustrates the following themes:
• A marriage contract of aroha, Tangata Tiriti signed on behalf of the Crown which enabled may peoples to come to New Zealand
• The beautiful colours of the rainbow represent the many cultures of New Zealand
• The weave represents integration of cultures
• Our links to the islands are also acknowledged and form a cross an important part of our heritage

Māoriland Festival

The Māoriland Film Festival kicks off in Otaki later this month and we think you will want to be there!! Running from 23-27 March, the festival is the largest indigenous film festival in the Southern Hemisphere and will feature films from the Marshall Islands, USA and Canada, while also showcasing Māori cinema from Aotearoa. You can see the list of feature films and the film schedule here and follow the festival blog here. My pick for the festival is Three Wise Cousins; check out the trailer below!

Well-known New Zealand films The Dark Horse and The Deadlands both featured in the 2015 Māoriland festival and are both available at the library:

The Dead LandsThe dead lands / a Matthew Metcalfe production ; a Toa Fraser film.
After his tribe is slaughtered through an act of treachery, Hongi, a Maori chieftain’s teenage son, must avenge his father’s murder in order to bring peace and honor to the souls of his loved ones. Vastly outnumbered by a band of villains, Hongi’s only hope is to pass through the feared and forbidden Dead Lands and forge an uneasy alliance with the mysterious Warrior, a ruthless fighter who has ruled the area for years.

The Dark HorseThe dark horse / Four Knights Film in association with The New Zealand Film Commission [and six others] present ; a film by James Napier Robertson.
The Dark Horse is an emotionally-charged and inspiring drama about a man who searches for the courage to lead, despite his own adversities – finding purpose and hope in passing on his gift to the children in his community.

Mahana

Mahana, a movie based on renowned author Witi Ihimaera’s much-loved book Bulisbasha, opens this week in cinemas and I am extremely excited to see it. Here’s the trailer, which is bound to get you excited to see it too:

It was first hinted at over a year ago (we told you about it here!) and it is so great to finally see it hitting cinemas.

If you want to read the book before you see the movie, we recommend you get in quick as it’s already proving popular! Place your reserves here:

Cover from SyndeticsBulibasha : king of the gypsies / Witi Ihimaera.
“Witi Ihimaera’s first novel for six years. Two patriarchs on the East Coast of New Zealand fight for the title of king, and their families are involved in conflict in sport and culture, and in the Golden Fleece contest. Simeon, a teenager, is caught in the middle of the struggle. The novel was written when Witi Ihimaera was Katherine Mansfield Fellow in Menton.” (Syndetics summary)

Also, another Ihimaera book which has been made into a world-famous film:

Syndetics book coverThe whale rider / Witi Ihimaera.
“Witi Ihimaera’s timeless story tells how the courage of one girl in standing against the tide of tradition enables her tribe to become reconnected with their ancestral life force. The Whale Rider has become one of Witi Ihimaera’s best-loved stories, capturing readers with its universal themes of conflict between generations and genders, respect for nature, family love and personal courage. Now the movie adaptation, Whale Rider, has brought the story to an international audience. This special edition of Ihimaera’s original novel includes a section of photos from the movie, a bonus for moviegoers and readers alike.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Aro VideoWhale rider [videorecording] / a film by Niki Caro.
“A contemporary story of love, rejection and triumph as a young Maori girl fights to fulfill a destiny her grandfather refuses to recognize.” (Library catalogue)

Ihimaera’s novel Nights in the Gardens of Spain was also developed into a feature film called Kawa (originally also titled Nights in the Gardens of Spain) and is most definitely worth a watch (and a read!). You can get them both out here:

Nights in the gardens of SpainNights in the gardens of Spain / Witi Ihimaera.
“A novel in which David Munro, the narrator, seems successful in marriage and in his career as a lecturer in film studies. He leads a double life, being married and gay, and the novel explores the resolution of the dilemma, the conflicting loyalties he has to deal with. The novel describes aspects of gay life, and the difficulties of developing relationships. It is very aware of the devastation of AIDS. The novel was written while Witi Ihimaera was Katherine Mansfield Fellow in Menton.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Aro VideoNights in the gardens of Spain [videorecording] / Cinco Cine Film Productions Ltd and Conbrio Media Ltd.
“This feature film adaptation of Witi Ihimaera’s iconic novel about David, a successful businessman who inexplicably estranges himself from his wife and children. Turns out, he is having an affair with a young male actor and is torn between living that life or the one that he is expected to live by his immediate and extended family. Complicating matters is his family’s deep roots in the Maori culture, which disapproves of homosexuality. For a while, the family suspects that David is seeing a woman. But one night, the actor unexpectedly shows up at David’s family compound, where his mother catches the two in a passionate embrace. She immediately banishes David from the compound, leading him to reveal the truth to all who are important to him.” (Library catalogue)

Toitū te whenua

There’s a diversity of kaupapa in this handful of books – organic gardening, pacifism of Parihaka, an outline of Māori participation in privatised military industry, stories from Tuhoe kaumatua and kuia, and a collection of research essays and thoughts on the home.

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“”Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on”–Back cover.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Whiti o Rongomai and the resistance of Parihaka / Danny Keenan.
“This is an account of the life and times of Te Whiti o Rongomai set against the politics and Crown policies of the nineteenth century. It traces the forces that shaped his life’s journey from Ngāmotu, where he was born, to his settling at Parihaka and his evolving sense of the injustices and disempowerment Māori experienced and his response to these. The book discusses the struggles Te Whiti had, as understood by some of his living relatives, against native policy of the time, and it gives insights into the motivations of Te Whiti and his actions. It explores the community at Parihaka, its resistance and the consequences of this and looks at Māori and government actions and responses up to the present day”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverA hidden economy : Māori in the privatised military industry / Maria Bargh.
“The Maori economy is often defined simply by the contributions of Maori in New Zealand in the areas of farming, fisheries and forestry. This book explores the ways that Maori in the privatised military industry contribute in monetary and non-monetary ways to the Maori economy. Workers in the privatised military industry very rarely, if ever, give interviews about their work or details about their pay. However, this book includes five interviews with Maori who have worked or are still working in the privatised military industry and explores how they articulate themselves as Maori in the industry, giving a glimpse at this secret world and how Maori operate in it.” (Syndetics summary)

Te ahi kaaroa : Rūātoki kaumātua narratives / Te Manatū Mātauranga o Tūhoe.
“”The Tuhoe Education Authority Te Manatu Matauranga o Tuhoe interviewed kuia and kaumatua in te reo Maori about their lives and experiences”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Ngā kaikōrero: George Thrupp, Rangipuke Tari, Tiwi Black, Patu Hale, Maureen Biddle, Kataraina Te Moana.

Syndetics book coverHome : here to stay / edited by Mere Kēpa, Marilyn McPherson and Linitā Manuʻatu.
“This is a collection of twelve academic essays that consider understandings of home and the impact of dominant societies on indigenous societies and their homes. The book covers home and language preservation, homelessness, retention of land, tobacco use in the home, loss of home through trauma and natural disaster, ageing and health, and the meaning of home. This is the third book in the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Edited Collections series.”–Publisher information.

Crimson / Marino Blank.

Syndetics book coverA Māori reference grammar / Ray Harlow.
“Based on a third-year university course Ray Harlow taught for a number of years, this grammar reference book is intended for people whose knowledge of Māori is at that level or higher – advanced learners, native speakers and teachers of Māori. The book provides explanations and examples of all the important sentence types of modern Māori. It guides readers progressively from the simple to the more complicated, starting with words and particles, proceeding through simple clauses and sentences to transformations of these and to complex sentences with elaborate internal structure”–Publisher information.

Talking about the Treaty

Display stand at the Takapuna LibraryTalk Treaty : Kōrerotia Te Tiriti is a display which features series of short video clips of well-known New Zealanders sharing their views about the Treaty of Waitangi and its implications.
This will be available in the Central, Miramar and Tawa libraries from 1 February, and Cummings Park branch from 9th February. Those stands will then travel to Kaori, Johnsonville and Newtown libraries in Mid March.
Topics covered include identity, te reo, coming to a greater understanding (between Māori and Pakeha), and cultural differences.
More info.