Kōrero with Morrie Love of the Tenths Trust at Central Library

On Friday 27 April (12:30pm),  Morrie Love, chairman of Wellington Tenths Trust will present Stories behind the Māori place names of Te Whanganui-a-Tara  / Wellington (harbour)

Whatu  Ngarongaro  He  Tangata,  Toitū  He  Whenua

Man disappears but the land remains

In the early 1800s the stories behind the naming of the land in Te Whanganui-a-Tara were often sourced to Te  Whatahoro Jury and three women  –  Ngarimu Mawene,  Mere Ngamai and Rangiwahia Te Puni.

Te  Whatahoro  Jury

Hoani Te Whatahoro Jury
Hoani Te Whatahoro Jury. Ref: 1/2-024828. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/23175005

Te Whatahoro Jury was born 1841 in Hawkes Bay — his father worked for William Williams.  In 1842 the family moved to Wairarapa.  He became a scribe to Te Matorohanga and Nepia Pohuhu and was charged with recording tribal traditions on behalf of his iwi.  Some of this material was used later, by Elsdon Best, T. W. Downes, S. Percy Smith and John White.  He married seven times.  He died 1923 and is buried at Papawai cemetery.

Ngarimu  Mawene  Hohua

Ngarimu Mawene is listed in documents held at Te Papa. Ngarimu Mawene may have been connected to Hohua Te Atuawera and Hariata Mawene, with links therefore Te Ngatoro and  (first?) husband, Wakairianiwa.  Te Ngatoro was, in turn, a daughter to Aniwaniwa and Tawhirikura.  It is said that, as a young girl, Ngarimu danced on the beach at Pito-one as the “Tory Pioneers” arrived in 1839.[1]

Mere  Kapa  Ngamai  I

Mere Kapa Ngamai I was the daughter of Rawiri Kowheta and Maweuweu.

She married, firstly James Harrison, and their children were James Te Tana Harrison and Mere Kapa Ngamai II.  Mere later married Wi Tako Ngatata.  She was also known as Mere Ngawai o Te Wharepouri.

Mere was a well-known composer — two of her compositions which have survived:

(Link is to Legends of the Māori.  Vol. I / James Cowan)

Rangi  Te  Puni

Wairau April 1851, Charles Gold
Gold, Charles Emilius, 1809-1871 : Wairau April 1851. Ref: A-329-014. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/23236682

Rangi Te Puni is believed to have been born in Waipa Valley, with links to Tainui and Ngāti Rārua. She succeeded to land at Te Tau Ihu o te Waka. Rangiwahia,(Rangiwhaia) was the daughter of Rangitakaia, and grandchild of Hinehape.[2] Rangiwahia was the wife of Henare Te Puni, who in turn was the son of Honiana Te Puni and Wikitoria Muri-tu-waka-roto.

[Whakapapa of Aperaham Huritapae: Nelson MB, 13/6/89 / [WMB  NO. 3, P. 39]

James  Cowan

James Cowan at his desk, writing
James Cowan at his desk, writing. Ruscoe, Ivan, fl 1990s : Photographs relating to James Cowan. Ref: PAColl-5877-5. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22311747

James Cowan has written about Māori place names  of Te Whanganui-a-Tara in the Evening Post, 1912. These are available on PapersPast, in the Evening Post:

Cowan’s kōrero has been reproduced, also, in Pat Lawlor‘s book:

Old Wellington Days.  Chapter 8:  James Cowan and his Wellington Place-names.

Old Wellington Days, by Pat Lawlor
Old Wellington Days, by Pat Lawlor

Threads are picked up again in:

A list of Māori place names of Te Whanganui-a-Tara  concludes Elsdon Best’s The land of Tara.  Here is a map from that book.

The Land of Tara, by Elsdon Best
The Land of Tara, by Elsdon Best

Te Whatahoro Jury’s work in transcribing  oral histories possibly, formed a basis for stories in Elsdon Best’s – The land of Tara, published first in the Journal of the Polynesian Society, and then in book form, 1919.

Best’s list of names was revised and greatly expanded by G Leslie Adkin in:

The great harbour of Tara : traditional Māori place-names and sites of Wellington harbour and environs / G Leslie Adkin (1959)

The Great Harbour of Tara, by G. Leslie Adkin

Surveyors

Māori have long had an interest in the spiritual value of land: it pervades their sense of identity and how they relate to others. But land is also the foundation of their survival, in economic as well as cultural terms [3]

Book Jacket for: Boundary markers : land surveying and the colonisation of New ZealandBoundary markers : land surveying and the colonisation of New Zealand / Byrnes, Giselle

Giselle Byrnes, writing of surveyors as Pākehā boundary markers, shows that these men were also naming the land, and “owning” the whenua for their colonial government in a way that parallels the Māori concept of Tapa Whenua.

 

Boundary markers suggest that the surveyors colonised the land through language, literally inscribing it with new meanings and ways of seeing:  place naming and mapping are perhaps the best examples of this [4]

For Māori, in oral tradition, naming the land was essential for defining  iwi and  hapū boundaries. Sites of tribal significance — maunga, awa, moana  then become key elements in kawa o te marae, and  whanaungatanga, in rituals of encounter, where politeness decrees that you ask not “ko wai koe?/ who are you?”, but rather, “nō hea koe? / where are you from?”

Surveyors extended their sketching skills to record not just Pākehā boundaries, but also snapshots of the life and times of our tūpuna.

Somes Island

Legend has it that both Matiu and Makaro Islands received their original Māori names from Kupe, the semi-legendary first navigator to reach New Zealand and get home again with reports of the new land. He named them after his two daughters (or, in some versions of the tale, nieces) when he first entered the harbour about 1000 years ago.

Somes Island : Matiu (1990)
Somes Island : Matiu (1990)

“After European settlement, the island was known for over a century as Somes Island. In 1839 it fell under the control of the New Zealand Company along with much of the greater Wellington region.”

“The island was renamed after Joseph Somes, the company’s deputy-governor and financier at the time. In 1997 however, the New Zealand Geographic Board assigned the official bilingual name of Matiu/Somes in recognition of the island’s colourful European and Māori histories.” [5]

I look forward to Morrie Love’s kōrero to reveal the layers of history that lie both beneath our feet and before our eyes, and  to provide an opportunity to understand the heritage of Te Whanganui-a-Tara.

References

  1. Stories in names / Tohunga.   New Zealand Railways magazine ; vol. 9, issue 6 (1934)
  2. Maori Land Court.  Nelson Minute Book.   13/6/89.  P. 39.
  3. Byrnes, Giselle.   Boundary markers.  P. 2
  4. Ibid.  p. 6
  5. Wikipedia contributors. (2018, March 16). Matiu / Somes Island. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 02:26, April 13, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Matiu_/_Somes_Island&oldid=830688561

He kohinga o te tau hou

Ngā mihi o te tau hou: amongst this varied collection of new books is a lovely new edition of Ani Mikaere’s The balance destroyed. The illustrations by Robyn Kahukiwa enhance the themes of Ani Mikaere’s thesis of twenty years ago – her research of mana wahine and ira wahine has more than stood the test of time.

Syndetics book coverFaith, politics and reconciliation : Catholicism and the politics of indigeneity / Dominic O’Sullivan.
“Were Catholics guilty of [aiding and abetting] the genocide of indigenous peoples during the colonization of Australia and New Zealand? … In order to answer these and other related questions over the role of the Roman Catholic Church in the colonization of Australia and New Zealand, Dominic O’Sullivan takes us on a theological, philosophical and political journey from the countries of Europe to the colonies of Australia and New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCities in New Zealand : preferences, patterns and possibilities / edited by Philippa Howden-Chapman, Lisa Early & Jennifer Ombler.
“This book outlines the latest thinking about the preferences people have for their urban life, the patterns of urban development in Aotearoa, and the possibilities for our cities in the future.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 7. Responding to the challenges: Māori and urban development by Andrew Waa, John Ryks, Biddy Libersey & Jonathan Kilgour.
p. 129. Unearthing urban Māori : 150+ years of tangata whenua participation in the development of Wellington city by Keriata Stuart.

Syndetics book coverKa hoki tāua ki te whare huri ai ē! / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“This collection of essays, all in Te Reo Maori, explores histories, people and places of significance, and takes the reader into the oral arts, including haka, karakia, and waiata… Ka titiro atu koe ki tetahi mea, ki tetahi whenua, ki tetahi awa, ki tetahi kainga, ki tetahi tangata ka hokia mai ano aua whakaaro me nga ahuatanga i kite ai koe i te wa i a koe e tamariki ana. .. Kai roto i teneki pukapuka e kitea ai te wairua o te kupu, a tena kaiwhakairo i te kupu, whakaniko i te kupu ataahua o roto mai i te rohe o Mataatua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverDancing with the King : the rise and fall of the King Country, 1864-1885 / Michael Belgrave.
“After the battle of Orakau in 1864 and the end of the war in the Waikato, Tawhiao, the second Maori King, and his supporters were forced into an armed isolation in the Rohe Potae, the King Country. For the next twenty years, the King Country operated as an independent state – a land governed by the Maori King where settlers and the Crown entered at risk of their lives.” (Syndetics summary)

Cover from Fishpond.co.nzTāngata Ngāi Tahu = People of Ngāi Tahu. Volume One / edited by Helen Brown and Takerei Norton.
“Mo tatou, a, mo ka uri a muri ake nei. For us and our children after us. Tangata Ngai Tahu remembers and celebrates the rich and diverse lives of the people of Ngai Tahu. Spanning time, geography and kaupapa, fifty biographies bring Ngai Tahu history into the present.” (fishpond.co.nz)

Syndetics book coverThe balance destroyed / Ani Mikaere ; with images by Robyn Kahukiwa.
Originally presented to the University of Waikato as a Master of Jurisprudence thesis.

Syndetics book coverWater rights for Ngai Tahu : A discussion paper
“In Water rights for Ngāi Tahu, Te Maire Tau considers the historical and political framework that has contributed to the current state of water rights in the Ngāi Tahu takiwā. He explores the customary, legal, and Treaty frameworks that feed into the debate regarding the ownership of water…” (back cover)

Syndetics book coverLeaders like you : New Zealand leaders share stories of courage, failure and commitment / copy, interviews & editing, Nick Sceats and Andrea Thompson ; portraits, Bonny Beattie.
Sceats, Nick and Andrea Thompson. Leaders like you : New Zealand leaders share stories of courage, failure and commitment. 2017.
p. 14. Bennett, Arihia. The power of listening.
p. 128 Dewes, Whaimutu. The evidential leader.
p. 156. Te Tau, Tui. Whe “why not?” leader.

Syndetics book coverThe history of Hawke’s Bay / Matthew Wright.
“Hawke’s Bay has a remarkable history, brief by world standards, yet filled with colour, pace and life. This illustrated history covers the broadest sweep of Hawke’s Bay’s past, telling the wider tale of people and their ideals… “(Syndetics summary)
p. 7. Land and people — Māui – arrival of Ngāti Kahungunu – Hawkes Bay during the ‘musket wars’
p. 27. Cowboy frontier – land sharks and proselytes – Donald Mclean’s land purchases – the war at Te Pakiakia –
p. 68. (The land of the shepherd kings) – race, war and politics.

Cover from Fishpond.co.nzSearches for tradition : essays on New Zealand music, past & present / edited by Michael Brown & Samantha Owens.
“In Douglas Lilburn’s famous address to the 1946 Cambridge Summer School of Music, the composer described his ‘search for tradition’ in the music of New Zealand and spelled out his hopes that a distinctive art music might yet emerge here.
p. 59. Alfred Hill’s ‘Māori songs : whose tradition?” by Melissa Cross
p. 125 Whāia te māramatanga : the search for enlightenment by Valance Smith
p. 139 Mai I te pō : the reclamation of taonga pōro as a living treasure by Awhina Tamarapa and Ariana Tikao
p. 223 Shaping traditions of vocality : the lyrical legacy of Kiri Te Kanawa by Jenny Wollerman

Syndetics book coverTelling the real story : genre and New Zealand literature / Erin Mercer.
“Telling the Real Story: Genre and New Zealand Literature interrogates the relationships between genre, realism and New Zealand literature…” (Syndetics summary)
p. 205. ‘Something that described the real New Zealand’ : Keri Hulme’s The Bone people and Witi Ihimaera’s The matriarch.

Syndetics book coverLinguist at work : festschrift for Janet Holmes / edited by Meredith Marra and Paul Warren.
“Throughout her 45-year career at Victoria University of Wellington, Professor Janet Holmes has operated at the cutting edge of sociolinguistics. She is recognised as a field leader, a pioneer for new approaches, and a warm and generous mentor…” (Syndetics summary)
P. 159. Audiences, referees and landscapes : understanding the use of Māori and English in New Zealand dual language picture books through a sociolinguistic lens by Nicola Daly.

Syndetics book coverPetroleum development and environmental conflict in Aotearoa New Zealand : Texas of the South Pacific / Terrence M. Loomis.
“Petroleum Development and Environmental Conflict in Aotearoa New Zealand: Texas of the South Pacific examines the dilemmas associated with economic growth through the expansion of resource extraction. … Terrence M. Loomis analyzes the circumstances under which environmental opposition to state policies to promote oil and gas development–in collaboration with the petroleum industry–, has lead to far-reaching changes in institutional relations between the state and civil society.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 163. Selling the East Coast.
p. 193. Community and indigenous responses to oil and gas development

Pukapuka hou: Kōanga, 2017 (New books: Spring 2017)

Wellington City Libraries now holds Cyrus Hingston’s Pou o Whakaue: marae of Whakaue, and we look forward to the arrival of his companion book, Pou o Ue. Rangi Matamua published Matariki the star of the year, and we welcome now the reo Māori edition, Matariki: te whetū tapu o te tau. Finally, some very interesting thoughts on kaupapa Māori by a collection of of our favourite authors and scholars.

Pou o Whakaue : marae of Whakaue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Whakaue is a history of eight marae of Whakaue – the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the tangata whenua and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the ancestor Whakaue and Te Arawa whanui.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCritical conversations in kaupapa Māori / edited by Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones.
“Kaupapa Māori theory and methodology developed over twenty years ago and have since become influential in social research, practice and policy areas. The collection contains chapters by Brad Coombes, Garrick Cooper, Mason Durie, Carl Mika, Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Alice Te Punga Somerville, Georgina Stewart and Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni, along with the collection editors.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverMatariki : te whetū tapu o te tau / Rangi Matamua.
“In midwinter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky, and its observation is celebrated with incantations on hilltops at dawn, balls, exhibitions, dinners and a vast number of events. The Matariki tradition has been re-established, and its regeneration coincides with a growing interest in Māori astronomy. Still, there remain some unanswered questions about how Matariki was traditionally observed. What is Matariki? Why did Māori observe Matariki? How did Māori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated? This book seeks answers to these questions and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and clebrated in our modern society.” (Back cover)

Image from VUPInternational indigenous rights in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Andrew Erueti.
“Over the past four decades, international indigenous rights have become a prominent aspect of international law and are now enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Yet, while endorsed by Aotearoa New Zealand in 2010, little remains known about how these standards came about, how the international movement that created them was established, and the implications of these standards on national reforms already protecting Māori rights. International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand seeks to answer these questions.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJuridical encounters : Māori and the colonial courts, 1840-1852 / Shaunnagh Dorsett
“From 1840 to 1852, the Crown Colony period, the British attempted to impose their own law on New Zealand. In theory Maori, as subjects of the Queen, were to be ruled by British law. But in fact, outside the small, isolated, British settlements, most Maori and many settlers lived according to tikanga … Shaunnagh Dorsett examines the shape that exceptional laws took in New Zealand, the ways they influenced institutional design and the engagement of Maori with those new institutions, particularly through the lowest courts in the land.” (Syndetics summary)

By their fruits you will know them : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church. Volume 2 / edited by Selwyn Katene.
“This book follows ‘Turning the Hearts of the Children’, exploring why so many Māori in the 1880s were inspired to question the mainstream churches and flock to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon church.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverHuia short stories. 12 : contemporary Māori fiction.
“Here are the best short stories and novel extracts from the Pikihuia Awards for Māori writers 2017 as judged by Whiti Hereaka, Paula Morris, Poia Rewi amd Rawinia Higgins. The book contains the stories from the finalists for Best Short Story written in English, Best Short Story written in te reo Māori and Best Novel Extract categories.” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverThese two hands : a memoir / Renée.
“Renee Paule lives in Otaki and teaches her Your Life, Your Story and her Poem a Week workshops there. This is just one version of her life, her story, told in patches, like a quilt.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe fuse box : essays on writing from Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters / edited by Emily Perkins and Chris Price.
“From Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters, The Fuse Box offers writing strategies and guidance on keeping the faith from some of our best writers. Starting with the instigating spark, through to currents and connections, these essays shine a light on the creative process. They explore what to write about and how to get started, how to keep the flow going over time, freedom and constraint, how your writing might meet the world, and how to make the most of accidents. Poets, dramatists, novelists and writing teachers open up to reveal their wiring in essays that are strikingly honest, political and playful.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 91. The story that matters by Tina Makereti.
p. 204. Patricia Grace : an interview with Briar Grace-Smith

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand between the wars / edited by Rachael Bell.
“If World War One was the crucible that forged an independent New Zealand identity, then the two decades following are surely the years in which the foundation for the new nation was laid. In shedding the last vestiges of colonial society in exchange for the trappings of a modern democratic nation, the 1920s and 1930s in New Zealand set a blueprint for state intervention and assistance that remained unchallenged for the next 50 years.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Once were muttonbirders: Ngāti Kuia’s flight to retain its Tītī harvesting rights by Peter Meihana.

Remembering Jonathan Mane-Wheoki

Artwork at entrance to Central LibraryA memorial is currently underway which remembers a well known Wellington figure Jonathan Mane-Wheoki. The project includes NZ artist Shannon Novak installing a small artwork in 10 locations around Wellington – 10 locations Jonathan frequented and supported. Wellington Central Library was identified as one of the locations, and the artwork is now installed on a glass panel in the Ground floor entrance area. The installation is called “Pieces at an Exhibition” (named after his favourite musical piece).

Jonathan Ngarimu Mane-Wheoki CNZM (8 December 1943 – 10 October 2014) was a New Zealand art historian, academic, and curator. Of Ngāpuhi, Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī and English descent, he was a pioneer in the study of contemporary Māori and Pacific art history. Jonathan invested much of his time and energy into the arts community in Wellington, including a stint as Director of Art and Collection services at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in 2004.

The library also has available a copy of Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker, which was recently launched by Victoria University Press.

Dr George S Evans : a life

Recently I breathed in the gentle gentility of the Wellington Club, The Terrace, whilst held in awe of Helen Riddiford’s meticulous and deeply researched account of the New Zealand Company’s finest member, Dr George Samuel Evans.

geo1By evening’s end, there were surely more than the just the two of us who would attest to his right to be named Wellington’s founding father, – a man who stood tall on the principles and the application of the Company’s constitution and held a desire to include tangata whenua in te ao hurihuri, / an evolving new life. In the words of one of our two official languages – here was a man truly worthy of the description: he kōtuku rerenga tahi.

For all the sentiments expressed above – how many people , today, remember any details of this man who gave his name to that inner bay (Evans’s / Evans Bay) and whose contribution to the settlement placed him second only to Colonel Wakefield, in his roles, which included that of chief judicial authority for the new colony.

When Edward Gibbon Wakefield accompanied Lord Durham to Canada, it was Dr Evans who stepped forward to place his hand firmly on the tiller of the colonial ship.

But who was this man? George Evans grew up in a household where civil and religious liberty was embraced. He was a brilliant scholar who excelled in Latin, Greek and Hebrew – His later work spanned the fields of education, judiciary and journalism. In 1928 he became, briefly, headmaster of Mill Hill School, London.

geo2
(Source: School House at Mill Hill School : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mill_Hill_School)

It was here that he met school matron Mrs Riddiford, whose husband passed away in 1829. George and Harriet married, 16 January 1930, and George became the stepfather of Amelia (13 years) and Daniel (16 years) – he, Daniel, who was to become the founder of the Riddiford farming dynasty at Orongorongo and the stations around the Wairarapa coast of New Zealand.

There is so much detail of Evans’ life within the pages of this book. There’s the interesting story of his involvement with Nayti and Hiakai, two passengers on the Mississippi who became stranded at Le Havre, were rescued by the New Zealand Association and provided with lodgings by Wakefield and Evans, in the 1830s. With Hiakai’s help George Evans was introduced to Māori customs and reo. He began a grammar of Te Reo Māori, which was completed in 1839, but never officially published. Wellington City Central Library holds a copy of this Manuscript of a Maori grammar.

The top view stretches across Thorndon Flat with Dr Evans’ house on the left, a range of early houses and businesses along the waterfront and on the right, Colonel William Wakefield’s house with flagpole.

geo3

(Source: Brees, Samuel Charles, 1810-1865 :Pictorial Illustrations of New Zealand. London, John Williams and Co., Library of Arts, 141, Strand, 1847.. Ref: PUBL-0020-22. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22816178)

Dr Evans fulfilled a designated role as advocate for Māori in all legal disputes – with varying degrees of success. Helen’s easy- read documentation of Dr Evans life and work in the new colony makes this book an absolute must for those of us mindful of the view – that you must first understand and embrace the past in order to move forward.

The study of the settlement of Wellington is a very complex exercise – but – don’t be confined only to those official publications — the reports and commissions, and records of deeds of release – Here lies, within these pages, the flavour of that era. This is a far more interesting journey by way of Helen’s archival research and her detailed account of Dr Evans work.

Dr Evans returned to England, 1846-52, and was dealt to harshly by the Company, in clearing the debts on his town and country sections in Wellington. It was an example of Wakefield’s ‘ability’ to turn against his closest allies.

George Evans and Harriet moved to Melbourne, 1853. He planned to undertake legal work but also began working with the Melbourne Morning Herald. He later gained a seat in the legislative assembly. His journalistic output was legendary. George and Harriet returned to New Zealand, 1865, but Harriet died 31 March 1866, and Dr Evans’ death followed in 1868.

In the words of Helen Riddiford “In the colonies he was head and shoulders above many of his peers in education and ability. He operated within an influential network of men, but was always independent in his views, which isolated him from many of his contemporaries. He was viewed as a ‘singular character’ a gentleman almost unique in this setting. His many visionary ideas were handicapped by a volatile temperament and principles that were compromised by circumstances, an unpredictable man of reckless courage whose steadfast commitment to the creation and success of Wellington was fully acknowledged after his death. Amongst others, The Independent noted that he was ‘one of the founders, if not the real founder of this colony. There is scarcely an official document of the period in which [his] name is not conspicuous”.

Here was a man truly worthy of the title bestowed by his Māori friends – Nui, Nui Rangatira

New books in our Maori collection

In this selection we have another beautiful art book – Artefacts of Encounter – which begins with stories of artefacts collected during Cook’s three voyages, followed by examples of colonial collecting and museum histories.

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania. … The collection includes some 100 artefacts dating from Cook’s first voyage. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Syndetics summary)

Image from Huia PublishingThe struggle for Māori fishing rights : te ika a Māori / Brian Bargh.
“Maori fishing rights were ignored by the Crown from the time the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840. Although guaranteed by the Treaty, Maori struggled to re-establish these rights until the 1980s after years of argument in the courts. Four pou, or pillars of support, significantly assisted in the recognition and eventual recovery of Maori fishing rights: the Treaty of Waitangi; the courts; the Waitangi Tribunal and the resilience and tenacity of Maori people, who never gave up fighting for what was right.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWomen of the Catlins : life in the deep south / edited by Diana Noonan ; photography by Cris Antona.
“A haunting, off-the-beaten-track destination, the little-known Catlins region of New Zealand is as mysterious today as it ever was. In this first in-depth look at the lives of its inhabitants, award-winning writer Diana Noonan and photographer Cris Antona collaborate to capture the thoughts and feelings of 26 women from this remote outpost. As the subjects speak for themselves on topics as diverse as family, work, isolation and their relationship with the environment, there is, at last, an opportunity for readers to enter into the heart of this rugged, unknown landscape where few venture and only the strongest make it home.” (Syndetics summary) Includes lives of: Rona Williamson (Ngāi Tahu) ; Heni Landreth (Ngāti Porou) ; Liz Cairns (Ngāpuhi), ; Nikeisha Clarke (Ngāi Tahu)

Te herenga reo : indigenous storytellers, Matariki, 2015 / compiled and curated by Te Herenga Reo Press for Te Herenga Reo Trust.
Contributors: Tama Waipara, Rob Ruha, Marama Davidson, Cilla Ruha, Michelle Ngamoki, Dayle Takitimu.

Syndetics book coverKa ngaro te reo : Maori language under siege in the nineteenth century / Paul Moon
“Ka ngaro te reo, ka ngaro taua, pera i te ngaro o te moa. If the language be lost, man will be lost, as dead as the moa. In 1800, te reo Maori was the only language spoken in New Zealand. By 1899, it was on the verge of disappearing altogether. In Ka Ngaro Te Reo, Paul Moon traces the spiralling decline of the language during an era of prolonged colonisation that saw political, economic, cultural and linguistic power shifting steadily into the hands of the European core…” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPerforming indigenous culture on stage and screen : a harmony of frenzy / Marianne Schultz.
“Examining corporeal expressions of indigenousness from an historical perspective, this book highlights the development of cultural hybridity in New Zealand via the popular performing arts, contributing new understandings of racial, ethnic, and gender identities through performance. The author offers an insightful and welcome examination of New Zealand performing arts via case studies of drama, music, and dance, performed both domestically and internationally.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe first migration : Māori origins 3000BC – AD1450 / Atholl Anderson.
“Thousands of years ago migrants from South China began the journey that took their descendants through the Pacific to the southernmost islands of Polynesia. Atholl Anderson’s … synthesis of research and tradition charts this epic journey of New Zealand’s first human inhabitants. Taken from … Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History this Text weaves together evidence from numerous sources: oral traditions, archaeology, genetics, linguistics, ethnography, historical observations, palaeoecology, climate change and more.” (Syndetics summary)

#MatarikiMash # 6!

It’s time for another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • noho (sit/stay)
  • whānau (family)
  • watch
  • stand

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

#MatarikiMash challenge #4

Welcome to another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • kura (school, red)
  • whai (follow, string game)
  • practice
  • season

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Te Tiriti talks at Central Library

On Friday 29 April Wellington City Libraries, in collaboration with Wellington Treaty Network, begins a series of three “Tiriti” talks at Central Library covering themes of past, present and future.

1
Hineteiwaiwa. Haeata Collective, 1990, Robyn Kahukiwa, artist : Mana Tiriti
Friday 29 April 12.30pm:
The series begins with stories of the local signatories to Te Tiriti within the rohe of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, April and May, 1840.
Mana Whenua – Honiana Love, Mark Teone, Kura Moeahu — describe whānau who put their marks to Henry Williams’ “treaty” sheet no. 8, April, 1840.

There will be stories of Kumutoto, Pipitea/Waiwhetu, and Piti-one – describing well-known identities, such as Te Puni, Wi Tako, and others less well-known, but whose life histories are important to us, ngā uri of those who made their hikoi to this rohe in 1820s-1840s.

2
Claudia Orange. ‘Treaty of Waitangi – Creating the Treaty of Waitangi’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 16-Nov-12
Licensed by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage for re-use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence.

Friday 6 May 12.30pm:
The theme of the second week is a contemporary issue: Clean Water — and illustrates local solutions for a global problem.
Ray Ahipene-Mercer was at the forefront of the drive for clean water, joining the Wellington Clean Water Campaign, 1984, and taking a claim to the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986. This claim was put on hold when Wellington citizens began to see the need for changes to the local sewage treatment. Concern for the water issues led to collaboration with Aila Taylor, (Motunui Claim) and other iwi, in raising awareness of nationwide issues of pollution.

3Image courtesy of wellington.govt.nz
Morrie Love will speak also – his theme: his experiences with indigenous freshwater fish – important tales so little known to many people of this rohe.

Friday 13/5 12.30pm:
The third week centres on the Pākehā engagement with the Treaty – describing a thirty year collective action by Project Waitangi/Wellington Treaty Network whose members were challenged by questions along the lines of: – “so what are you doing about the treaty”?
Speakers include Mary Haggie, Jeff Drane and Jen Margaret.

4
Nau mai, haere mai ki to tātou whare pukapuka : Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui

In conclusion:
Would you have voted for a flag like this? Kiwi iwi flag by Mere Drake (nee Wehipeihana)
5
This design acknowledges the unique place of Tangata Whenua and their partnership with Tangata Tiriti in the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and illustrates the following themes:
• A marriage contract of aroha, Tangata Tiriti signed on behalf of the Crown which enabled may peoples to come to New Zealand
• The beautiful colours of the rainbow represent the many cultures of New Zealand
• The weave represents integration of cultures
• Our links to the islands are also acknowledged and form a cross an important part of our heritage

Māoriland Festival

The Māoriland Film Festival kicks off in Otaki later this month and we think you will want to be there!! Running from 23-27 March, the festival is the largest indigenous film festival in the Southern Hemisphere and will feature films from the Marshall Islands, USA and Canada, while also showcasing Māori cinema from Aotearoa. You can see the list of feature films and the film schedule here and follow the festival blog here. My pick for the festival is Three Wise Cousins; check out the trailer below!

Well-known New Zealand films The Dark Horse and The Deadlands both featured in the 2015 Māoriland festival and are both available at the library:

The Dead LandsThe dead lands / a Matthew Metcalfe production ; a Toa Fraser film.
After his tribe is slaughtered through an act of treachery, Hongi, a Maori chieftain’s teenage son, must avenge his father’s murder in order to bring peace and honor to the souls of his loved ones. Vastly outnumbered by a band of villains, Hongi’s only hope is to pass through the feared and forbidden Dead Lands and forge an uneasy alliance with the mysterious Warrior, a ruthless fighter who has ruled the area for years.

The Dark HorseThe dark horse / Four Knights Film in association with The New Zealand Film Commission [and six others] present ; a film by James Napier Robertson.
The Dark Horse is an emotionally-charged and inspiring drama about a man who searches for the courage to lead, despite his own adversities – finding purpose and hope in passing on his gift to the children in his community.