Reo, wairua and whenua

John Patterson produces another thought provoking book to add to his well-known writings on Māori values and there’s an interesting clutch of books on aspects of te reo, Puanga, and root vegetables for the garden.

Pacific parables : learning from Māori tradition / John Patterson ; with illustrations by Pat Hanly.
“In this book, John Patterson tries to encourage a more sensitive and sympathetic attitude among Pākehā people by showing how the traditional narratives of the Māori – what we still tend to call their myths and legends – can open our eyes to some of the deeper aspects of Māori philosophical and political thought.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMormon and Maori / Marjorie Newton.
“The New Zealand Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints … was really two missions: one conducted among Pakeha (European) New Zealanders, and another among the indigenous people of the islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand … Those assigned to Maori work learned to love a noble, proud, but disgruntled race, a people smarting from the confiscation of their land and their consequent loss of mana … disenchanted with orthodox Christian churches, and whose numbers were shrinking to the point where extinction or amalgamation seemed in the eyes of many Europeans, at the time of the Mormon approach, their only future prospect”–Preface, p. xi-xii.

Te Rongopai 1814 ‘Takoto te pai!’ : bicentenary reflections on Christian beginnings and developments in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Allan Davidson, Stuart Lange, Peter Lineham, Adrienne Puckey.
“ll of the essays .. were originally prepared for a conference held at Waitangi, 27-29 November 2012 … The conference aimed to stimulate critical reflection on missionary beginnings in New Zealand and the formative influences of Christianity in early inter-relationships of Māori and Pākehā”–Preface p. 7.

Syndetics book coverMaranga mai! : te reo and marae in crisis? / edited by Merata Kawharu.
“…te reo and tribal marae today seem to be in crisis… without a living language spoken regularly on the marae or in everyday lives, what does the future hold for Māori and for our nation?”–Back cover.
Writers include: Merimeri Penfold, Paul Tapsell, Hōne Sadler, Arapera Ngaha, Margie Hōhepa, Fraser Toi, Stephen McTaggart, Kiri Toki, Merata Kawharu, with Paratene Tane, Pounamu Jade Aikman-Dodd, Michael Hennessy

Syndetics book coverHow to find a taniwha : a deep connection between English and Māori words / Trevor Lloyd.
“Many languages have similar sounds and all have similar semantic elements that make up word meanings. But the existence of the same or equivalent sounds and elements of meaning in many words of two unrelated languages as described in this book, is very surprising and cannot be explained by current linguistic theory”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverThe value of the Māori language = Te hua o te reo Māori / edited by Rawinia Higgins, Poia Rewi and Vincent Olsen-Reeder.
“This collection of essays in Māori and English explores the actions taken to restore the status of the Māori language, challenges ideas about how the language can be revitalised and looks at approaches to ensure the future of the language. The chapters discuss issues around the Māori Language Act and Crown policy, community initiatives, language development in the education system, and support of Māori language in media”–Back cover.

The new electoral politics in New Zealand : the significance of the 2011 election / edited by Jack Vowles.
p. 141. Māori voters, public policy and privatisation by Ann Sullivan, Martin von Randow and Aimee Matiu.

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Puanga is the star Rigel in Orion. Most of the tribes of the Māori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Māori New Year. In Māori mythology he was believed to be the older brother of Matariki. His cosmic rising between May and June in the early morning sky signalled the beginning of winter which is why Māori knew him as the foremost winter star.”–Whakataki, p. 4.

Rauwaru, the proverbial garden : Ngā-weri, Māori root vegetables, their history and tips on their use / Nick Roskruge.
“Root vegetables termed nga-weri in Māori, are classified as ‘root’ crops but can actually be either roots, tubers, swollen stems or even fungi… Vegetables and food crops need to be able to survive through to harvest in this climate and root crops are especially valuable for their ability to store in-ground beyond the life of the plant itself.”–p. ii