Ngā Mihi o te Tau Hou: New books for 2019 in the Māori Collection

Ngā mihi o te Tau Hou! Happy New Year! We start 2019 in a reflective mood with a wide range of new items in our Māori Collection that examine our rich past. These include the newly knighted Sir Kim Workman’s fascinating memoir, Journey Towards Justice, a look at Māori and cartooning in New Zealand from Paul Diamond, an exploration of the 1864 battle at Pukehinahina/Gate Pā by Buddy Mikaere and Cliff Simons, and a wonderful new time-travel novel for young adults by Whiti Hereaka.

Syndetics book coverJourney towards justice / Kim Workman.
“Kim Workman is a central figure in the on-going discussion of justice and prison policy in New Zealand. This memoir tells his remarkable story: from early years growing up in the Wairarapa to working as a police officer during the 1960s and 70s, from his public service roles that included being head of prisons in the early 1990s to his emergence as a passionate advocate for radical justice reform. This is a fascinating and honest story dealing with struggle, spirituality, questions of cultural identity and the state and social forces that have helped shape contemporary New Zealand.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSavaged to suit: Māori and cartooning in New Zealand / Paul Diamond
“In the earliest cartoons featuring Māori, they appeared as savages; today they are likely to be drawn in corporate-world suits. While concentrating on the period from the 1930s to the 1990s, this book also looks back to the first cartoons showing Māori and includes 21st century images. It looks at how Māori and Māori culture and life were seen by cartoonists in a succession of stereotypes over many decades of changing perceptions and attitudes and considers how these stereotypes criticised Māori and their culture to ‘suit’ cartoonists’ agendas.” (Adapted from cover)

Victory at Gate Pā?: the battle of Pukehinahina-Gate Pā: 1864 / Mikaere, Piritihana
“The Battle of Pukehinahina was a defining moment in New Zealand history. It brought together forces representing the British Empire’s military machine, political manoeuvring and settler land hunger, Māori notions of sovereignty and self-determination, Christian ideals, and death on a rainy afternoon in Tauranga in 1864. Here the story of the battle is told by two voices – Buddy Mikaere, who is a descendant of Māori who fought in the battle, and Cliff Simons, who has a PhD in Defence and Strategic Studies.” (Adapted from back cover)

Syndetics book coverOceanic Art (World of Art)
“The colors and patterns of Pacific Island art have long entranced Western audiences and artists. This book looks beyond the familiar surfaces of spears and shields, carved canoe prows and feather capes to discover the significance of art, past and present, for the people of the Pacific. This second edition includes a new chapter on globalization and contemporary art, and shows how each region is characterised by certain art forms and practices.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Ocean: tales of voyaging and encounter that defined New Zealand / Ell, Sarah
“Lying in the middle of a vast ocean, Aotearoa was the last habitable land mass in the world to be settled by humans. Our history represents the powerful coming-together of two great seafaring traditions, Polynesian and European. Ocean tells the stories of pioneers and trail-blazers, from the big names who left their mark on our history to everyday folk whose fates were dictated by time and tide.” (Adapted from our Catalogue)

Syndetics book coverLegacy / Whiti Hereaka
“Seventeen-year-old Riki is worried about school, the future, and his girlfriend. On his way to see her, he’s hit by a bus and life changes. Riki wakes up 100 years earlier in Egypt, in 1915, and finds he’s living through his great-great-grandfather’s experiences in the Maori Contingent. As he tries to understand what’s happening and find a way home, we go back in time and read transcripts of interviews Riki’s great-great-grandfather gave in 1975 about his experiences in this war. Gradually we realise the fates of Riki and his great-great-grandfather are intertwined.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGalleries of Maoriland
Galleries of Maoriland introduces us to the ways in which European colonists discovered, created, propagated and romanticised the Maori world and summed up in the popular nickname Maoriland. It could be seen in the paintings of Lindauer and Goldie; among artists, patrons, collectors and audiences; inside the Polynesian Society and the Dominion Museum; among stolen artefacts and fantastical accounts of the Maori past. The culture of Maoriland was a colonists creation and this book offers a new understanding of our art and our culture within that context.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Filming the colonial past: the New Zealand wars on screen / Cooper, Annabel
“The New Zealand Wars were defining events in our history.  This book tells a story of filmmaker’s fascination with these conflicts over the past 90 years. It discusses Rudall Hayward’s two versions of Rewis Last Stand (1925, 1940) and The Te Kooti Trail (1927), television drama (including The Governor), pioneering independent film (Geoff Murphy’s Utu), documentaries (notably the New Zealand Wars series of 1998) and feature films including Vincent Ward’s River Queen and Rain of the Children. In examining this history, Annabel Cooper illuminates a fascinating path of cultural change through successive generations of filmmakers.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

New Zealand Journal of History, Vol. 52, No. 2 October 2018
The latest issue of the New Zealand Journal of History has a fascinating item by Angela Middleton about Hariata Hongi (1815 – 1894), the daughter of Hongi Hika and wife of Hōne Heke. This article brings Hariata out of the shadows of her father and husband. It discusses her as an innovative leader who embraced new European skills and combined them with her skills from the traditional Māori world to engage in the political world of nineteenth century New Zealand.

Te papakupu o te reo matatini: a Māori language dictionary of literacy.
He pukapuka hei āwhina i te pouako e whakaako ana i roto i ngā kura reo Māori. Kei kōnei ngā kupu motuhake e hāngai ana ki ngā mata tini o te reo me te whakaako i te reo. This Māori language dictionary of literacy is a companion to Te Reo Pāngarau, Te Reo Pūtaiao, and Te Reo o Ngā Toi. It will invaluable to teachers in schools with a Māori language setting.

Shane Cotton at City Gallery

If you are looking for something (warm, dry and indoors!) to do in Wellington, I recommend you have a look around City Gallery in Civic Square. They are currently hosting an exhibition by esteemed and iconic New Zealand artist Shane Cotton (Ngāpuhi: Ngāti Rangi, Ngāti Hine, Te Uri Taniwha).

Shane Cotton has been a familiar name and figure in New Zealand art since the 1990s and his most recent exhibition, titled The Hanging Sky, features “a succinct and lively presentation of Cotton’s freshest work”. You can check out the full exhibition details on the City Gallery website.

You can find out more about Shane Cotton and his work here at the library:

Syndetics book coverShane Cotton.
“As a presentation of a prominent New Zealand artist, this beautifully designed display of Shane Cotton’s paintings is based on his major 2003 retrospective exhibition at City Gallery in Wellington, New Zealand. Demonstrating the work of Cotton (Ngapuhi: Ngati Rangi, Ngati Hine, Te Uri Taniwha) this volume presents the multiple aspects of his bicultural Maori and Pakeha heritage as well as the nature of New Zealand’s cultural identity.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverShane Cotton : The Hanging Sky
“For two decades Shane Cotton (ONZM, Ngapuhi) has been one of New Zealand’s most acclaimed painters. His works of the 1990s played a pivotal part in that decade’s debates about place, belonging and bicultural identity. In the mid 2000s, however, Cotton headed in a spectacular and unexpected new direction: skywards. Employing a sombre new palette of blue and black, he painted the first in what would become a major series of skyscapes-vast, nocturnal spaces where birds speed and plummet. The Hanging Sky brings together highlights from this period with four distinctive new responses.” (Syndetics)

Shane Cotton.
(This was published on the occasion of the exhibition “Shane Cotton” at the Hocken Library in 1999)

Tuakiri : Shane Cotton in the pursuit of identity / Shelley Jahnke.
“Surveys the production of [Shane Cotton’s] work from 1991-2003” (Library Catalogue)

Syndetics book coverTe huringa = Turning points : Pākehā colonisation and Māori empowerment : paintings from the collections of the Fletcher Trust and Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare O Rehua Whanganui.
The exhibition looks at the representation of Māori and Māori subject matter by Pākehā artists and as a turning point the way in which Māori artists have reflected their own ideas and concerns.

Syndetics book coverTaiāwhio II : contemporary Mäori artists : 18 new conversations / general editor Huhana Smith with Oriwa Soloman, Awhina Tamarapa and Megan Tamati-Quennell ; photography by Norman Heke.
“Taiawhio: Conversations with Contemporary Maori artists, now in its third reprint, has proven invaluable to art lovers, students, teachers and those with a passion for New Zealand art. This new volume profiles a fresh range of contemporary Maori artists. Each profile contains pages of information and quotes from the artists so readers can learn, in the artists own words, about their influences and inspirations, work methods and practice, while numerous full-colour photographs accompany each chapter, depicting the artists at work and showing the range of their work and the environment in which they create it. Short biographies are given for each artist profiled and a general introduction by Huhana Smith provides context for the interviews and background information about contemporary Maori art.” (Syndetics)

Hotere: Honouring an Icon

Ralph Hotere, or Hone Papita Raukura, was a prominent Māori artist and widely recognised as one of New Zealand’s most important artists. He was born in Mitimiti, Northland and was of Te Aupōuri and Te Rarawa decent. Known as a “warrior artist”, he was renowned for his passionately political artworks, as he provocatively portrayed some of New Zealand’s most divisive historical events. He is attributed with having helped shape New Zealand’s cultural identity, and was accordingly appointed to the Order of New Zealand in the New Year Honours 2012 for services to New Zealand. He passed away on 24 February 2013 at age 81, and was mourned and remembered in a large service in Dunedin on 28 February.

We have many books about Ralph Hotere here at the library:

Syndetics book coverRalph Hotere : black light : major works, including collaborations with Bill Culbert / [editors, Cilla McQueen … [et al.]]

Syndetics book coverRalph Hotere / with Kriselle Baker & Vincent O’Sullivan.

Syndetics book coverHotere : empty of shadows and making a shadow : lithographs by Ralph Hotere / Peter Vangioni, Jillian Cassidy ; introduction by Marian Maguire.

Syndetics book coverThe desire of the line : Ralph Hotere figurative works / Kriselle Baker.

As well as these, we have a DVD about Ralph Hotere:

Ralph Hotere / directed by Darcy Lange.

And even a video!

Hotere [videorecording] / a Paradise Films production ; written & directed by Merata Mita.
Discusses the artwork of New Zealand’s most famous contemporary Māori artist, Ralph Hotere. Suggested audience: general.

We also have a full collection at Central Library of Art New Zealand magazines, dating back to 1976. Ralph Hotere features in a huge number of them. If you need assistance to access the collection, just ask at any of our Central Library enquiries desks and we’ll be glad to help.