Pukapuka hou: Kōanga, 2017 (New books: Spring 2017)

Wellington City Libraries now holds Cyrus Hingston’s Pou o Whakaue: marae of Whakaue, and we look forward to the arrival of his companion book, Pou o Ue. Rangi Matamua published Matariki the star of the year, and we welcome now the reo Māori edition, Matariki: te whetū tapu o te tau. Finally, some very interesting thoughts on kaupapa Māori by a collection of of our favourite authors and scholars.

Pou o Whakaue : marae of Whakaue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Whakaue is a history of eight marae of Whakaue – the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the tangata whenua and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the ancestor Whakaue and Te Arawa whanui.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCritical conversations in kaupapa Māori / edited by Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones.
“Kaupapa Māori theory and methodology developed over twenty years ago and have since become influential in social research, practice and policy areas. The collection contains chapters by Brad Coombes, Garrick Cooper, Mason Durie, Carl Mika, Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Alice Te Punga Somerville, Georgina Stewart and Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni, along with the collection editors.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverMatariki : te whetū tapu o te tau / Rangi Matamua.
“In midwinter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky, and its observation is celebrated with incantations on hilltops at dawn, balls, exhibitions, dinners and a vast number of events. The Matariki tradition has been re-established, and its regeneration coincides with a growing interest in Māori astronomy. Still, there remain some unanswered questions about how Matariki was traditionally observed. What is Matariki? Why did Māori observe Matariki? How did Māori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated? This book seeks answers to these questions and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and clebrated in our modern society.” (Back cover)

Image from VUPInternational indigenous rights in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Andrew Erueti.
“Over the past four decades, international indigenous rights have become a prominent aspect of international law and are now enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Yet, while endorsed by Aotearoa New Zealand in 2010, little remains known about how these standards came about, how the international movement that created them was established, and the implications of these standards on national reforms already protecting Māori rights. International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand seeks to answer these questions.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJuridical encounters : Māori and the colonial courts, 1840-1852 / Shaunnagh Dorsett
“From 1840 to 1852, the Crown Colony period, the British attempted to impose their own law on New Zealand. In theory Maori, as subjects of the Queen, were to be ruled by British law. But in fact, outside the small, isolated, British settlements, most Maori and many settlers lived according to tikanga … Shaunnagh Dorsett examines the shape that exceptional laws took in New Zealand, the ways they influenced institutional design and the engagement of Maori with those new institutions, particularly through the lowest courts in the land.” (Syndetics summary)

By their fruits you will know them : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church. Volume 2 / edited by Selwyn Katene.
“This book follows ‘Turning the Hearts of the Children’, exploring why so many Māori in the 1880s were inspired to question the mainstream churches and flock to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon church.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverHuia short stories. 12 : contemporary Māori fiction.
“Here are the best short stories and novel extracts from the Pikihuia Awards for Māori writers 2017 as judged by Whiti Hereaka, Paula Morris, Poia Rewi amd Rawinia Higgins. The book contains the stories from the finalists for Best Short Story written in English, Best Short Story written in te reo Māori and Best Novel Extract categories.” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverThese two hands : a memoir / Renée.
“Renee Paule lives in Otaki and teaches her Your Life, Your Story and her Poem a Week workshops there. This is just one version of her life, her story, told in patches, like a quilt.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe fuse box : essays on writing from Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters / edited by Emily Perkins and Chris Price.
“From Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters, The Fuse Box offers writing strategies and guidance on keeping the faith from some of our best writers. Starting with the instigating spark, through to currents and connections, these essays shine a light on the creative process. They explore what to write about and how to get started, how to keep the flow going over time, freedom and constraint, how your writing might meet the world, and how to make the most of accidents. Poets, dramatists, novelists and writing teachers open up to reveal their wiring in essays that are strikingly honest, political and playful.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 91. The story that matters by Tina Makereti.
p. 204. Patricia Grace : an interview with Briar Grace-Smith

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand between the wars / edited by Rachael Bell.
“If World War One was the crucible that forged an independent New Zealand identity, then the two decades following are surely the years in which the foundation for the new nation was laid. In shedding the last vestiges of colonial society in exchange for the trappings of a modern democratic nation, the 1920s and 1930s in New Zealand set a blueprint for state intervention and assistance that remained unchallenged for the next 50 years.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Once were muttonbirders: Ngāti Kuia’s flight to retain its Tītī harvesting rights by Peter Meihana.

Anō, toitū te whenua: New Māori books

Our latest list of new Māori material includes an interesting fictionalised account of the Battle of Ōrākau, in both Te Reo and English by Witi Ihimaera. Pūkaki, a book about the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor has now been translated into te reo. A research publication on indigenous aspects of business and management include an overview of the environmental failures of the MV Rena written by Ella Henry.

Syndetics book coverSleeps standing : a story of the Battle of Orākau / Witi Ihimaera ; with Hēmi Kelly.
“Both fiction and fact, this fascinating book is a kaleidoscopic exploration of the Battle of Orakau …The battle marked the end of the Land Wars in the Waikato and resulted in vast tracts of land being confiscated for European settlement … It is estimated that, at the height of the battle, 1700 immensely superior troops, well-armed and amply resourced, laid siege to the hastily constructed pa at Orakau. The defenders were heavily outnumbered with few supplies or weapons but, when told to submit, they replied- ‘E hoa, ka whawhai tonu matou, ake, ake, ake!’ ‘Friend, I shall fight against you for ever, for ever!'” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverExtinguishing title : Maori land rights, people, and perspective in post-colonial New Zealand / Stella Coram.
“Without question, British ‘settlement’ of the new colony created a demand for Māori land and, to facilitate the sale of the land, the “Crown set about transferring customary land into individual title… My concern is that another injustice is being created since rights to title, required of Māori by the Crown in order to retain their land, are being summarily dismissed.” (Preface, pp. xiii-xiv)

Syndetics book coverTura and the fairies ; and, The overworlds and Tu : from Maori legendary lore / by Johannes Andersen.
“This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous aspirations and rights : the case for responsible business and management / edited by Amy Klemm Verbos, Ella Henry and Ana Maria Peredo.
Indigenous Aspirations and Rights takes an Indigenous perspective in examining the intersection of business with Indigenous peoples’ rights, in light of the UN Global Compact and the PRME. Indigenous rights include, but are not limited to, human, cultural, educational, employment, participatory development, economic, and social rights, rights to land and natural resources, and impacts on identity, institutions, and relations. This book illustrates three main aspects of business practices in relation to Indigenous peoples: learning from failure, unresolved issues and on-going challenges, and developing models for success.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPūkaki : te hokinga mai o te auahitūroa / Paul Tapsell ; whakamāoritanga nā Scotty te Manahau Morrison.
“First published in English in 2000, Paul Tapsell’s award-winning work brilliantly captured the life and transformations of Pūkaki the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor depicted on the New Zealand 20-cent coin. Now a superb translation by Scotty Morrison (also of Ngāti Whakaue descent) makes this illustrated work available entirely in Te Reo Māori.” (Syndetics summary)

Point of order, Mr Speaker? : modern Māori political leaders / edited by Selwyn and Rāhui Katene.
“Eight current or former Māori politicians from different political parties recount their leadership experiences and describe the significant events in their journeys from their early lives to Parliament. Paula Bennett, Te Ururoa Flavell, Hone Harawira, Tau Henare, Shane Jones, Nanaia Mahuta, Hekia Parata and Metiria Turei give readers a unique glimpse into their personal and public lives. They share their aspirations, lessons learned and knowledge gained while making meaningful contributions to Māori development.” (Syndetics summary)

He kōanga tangata tahi

Exploration, heritage and kōrero nehe – these are topics amongst the new books for He Kohikohinga Māori, Mahuru, 2017.

Syndetics book coverLaunching Marsden’s mission : the beginnings of the Church Missionary Society in New Zealand, viewed from New South Wales / eds. Peter G. Bolt & David B. Pettett.
“In 1794 the Rev Samuel Marsden became the second Chaplain to the Colony of New South Wales. Both Marsden and the first Chaplain, the Rev Richard Johnson, came to the Colony under the sponsorship of the Church of England Evangelicals. They had high hopes that New South Wales would be the base from which the ‘everlasting gospel’ would sound forth to achieve the salvation of the ‘poor benighted heathens’ of the South Seas. To this end Marsden began the mission to New Zealand on Christmas Day, 1814… This book is a celebration of that mission and Marsden’s preparations for it.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTears of Rangi : experiments across worlds / Anne Salmond.
“Six centuries ago Polynesian explorers, who inhabited a cosmos in which islands sailed across the sea and stars across the sky, arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand where they rapidly adapted to new plants, animals, landscapes and climatic conditions. In this, her most ambitious book to date, Dame Anne Salmond looks at New Zealand as a site of cosmo-diversity, a place where multiple worlds engage and collide. Like our ancestors, Anne Salmond suggests, we too may have a chance to experiment across worlds.” (Syndetics summary)

Tuai : a traveller in two worlds / Alison Jones & Kuni Kaa Jenkins.
“A thrilling biographical narrative of a young Bay of Islands leader who grew up in the Māori world of the early nineteenth century – and crossed the globe to encounter England in the midst of the industrial revolution. This is a story about the Māori discovery of England. These voyages between worlds represented risk and opportunity: Tuai chose opportunity, and the rest is history.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverTruth and beauty : verse biography in Canada, Australia and New Zealand / edited by Anna Jackson, Helen Rickerby, and Angelina Sbroma.
Truth and Beauty turns critical attention to an exciting genre that lies at the intersection of biography and poetry, narrative and lyric, history and the confessional. With essays on influential verse biographers Margaret Atwood, Dorothy Porter, Michael Ondaatje, Jennifer Maiden and Anne Carson along with newer practitioners including Chris Orsman, Jordie Albiston, Robert Sullivan, Tusiata Avia and Amy Brown, this collection looks at the inevitable tensions that arise between historical fact and the work of imagination – and the competing and complementary claims of truth and beauty.” (Syndetics summary)

Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki / edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker.

Syndetics book coverHistory, heritage, and colonialism : historical consciousness, Britishness, and cultural identity in New Zealand, 1870-1940 / Kynan Gentry.
History, heritage and colonialism offers an internationally relevant examination of the nexus between empire and colonial identity, by exploring the politics of history-making and interest in preserving the material remnants of the past in late nineteenth and early twentieth century colonial society… Offering important insights for societies negotiating the legacy of a colonial past in a global present, this book will be of particular value to all those concerned with museum, heritage, and tourism studies, and imperial history, at undergraduate and postgraduate level, as well as among scholars in these fields. It will also be of interest to a wider public interested in heritage and the history of museums.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHe reo wāhine : Māori women’s voices from the nineteenth century / Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla.
“During the nineteenth century, Maori women produced letters and memoirs, wrote off to newspapers and commissioners, appeared before commissions of enquiry, gave evidence in court cases, and went to the Native Land Court to assert their rights. He Reo Wahine is a bold new introduction to the experience of Maori women in colonial New Zealand through Maori women’s own words.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAnimism : respecting the living world / Graham Harvey.
“Animism’ is now an important term for describing ways in which some people understand and engage respectfully with the larger-than-human world. Its central theme is our relationship with our other-than-human neighbours, such as animals, plants, rocks, and kettles, rooted in the understanding that the term ‘person’ includes more than humans. Graham Harvey explores the animist cultures of Native Americans, Maori, Aboriginal Australians and eco-Pagans, introducing their diversity and considering the linguistic, performative, ecological and activist implications of these different animisms.” (Syndetics summary)

Ngā pepeha o te takere nui / Anaha Hiini.
“Here is a collection of pepehā for marae in the rohe of Te Arawa waka.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Scotty and Stacey Morrison.
“An introduction to the Maori language… covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household- whether you’re practising sport, getting ready for school, celebrating a birthday, preparing a shopping list or relaxing at the beach, Maori at home gives you the words and phrases – and confidence – you need.” (Syndetics summary)

New Zealand geographic; September-October 2017
p. 26. Star struck by Leonie Hayden. The story of aerospace engineer: Mana Vautier (Te Arawa and Ngāti Kahungunu)
p. 46. When worlds collide by Leonie Hayden. The story of Ihumātao, on the shores of Manukau Harbour : Auckland’s oldest settlement now designated special housing area.

Kia mau ki te tūmanako, te whakapono me te aroha

First on the list of Māori material this year, is a lovely collection of whakataukī – pearls of wisdom – grouped under six “virtues” mātauranga/wisdom ; māia/courage ; atawhai/compassion ; ngākau tapatahi/integrity ; whakahautanga/self-mastery ; and whakapono/belief. The whakataukī in the heading of this blog is listed under “tūmanako” – and translates as: Hold fast to hope, faith and love.

Syndetics book coverMauri ora : wisdom from the Māori world / Peter Alsop & Te Rau Kupenga.
“Pearls of wisdom contained in proverbs – whakatauk-I – have been gifted from generation to generation as an intrinsic part of the M-aori world. As powerful metaphors, they combine analogy and cultural history in the most economical of words. Short and insightful, they surprise, engendering reflection, learning and personal growth. Mauri Ora links whakatauk-I to key personal virtues idealised across cultures and generations. The virtues – wisdom, courage, compassion, integrity, self-mastery and belief – stem from the science of positive psychology; the study of how to live a better life.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGottfried Lindauer’s New Zealand : the Māori portraits / edited by Ngahiraka Mason and Zara Stanhope.
“From the 1870s to the early twentieth century, the Bohemian immigrant artist Gottfried Lindauer travelled to marae and rural towns around New Zealand and – commissioned by Maori and Pakeha – captured in paint the images of key Maori figures. For Maori then and now, the faces of tipuna are full of mana and life. Now this definitive work collects those portraits for New Zealanders. The book presents 67 major portraits and 8 genre paintings alongside detailed accounts of the subject and work, with essays by leading scholars that take us inside Lindauer and his world.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTakatāpui : a place of standing / [edited by] Jordon Harris.
“Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Māori (takatāpui) tell their stories and reflect on the journey from exclusion and prejudice to taking their rightful place in Aotearoa. Illustrated with stunning colour photographs, Takatāpui features introductions by Witi Ihimaera, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and the late Henare Te Ua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe toki me te whao : the story and use of Māori tools / Clive Fugill.
“It is over a century since the last major book on Māori carving tools. Clive Fugill, Master Carver at the NZ Māori Arts & Crafts Institute, tells the mythical, traditional and modern stories of the making and use of carving tools, including the adze (toki) and the chisel (whao) with detailed drawings and photos.” (Syndetics summary)

He iti kahurangi / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Particles are often a source of difficulty to Maori language learners, but using these correctly is essential in order to create a Maori spirit and flavour within the sentence, so that it sounds sweet to the Maori ear, and to follow nga tikanga o Te Reo Maori. Tohunga wetereo Heni Jacob explains the usage of the following pumuri and pumua: ahua, ake, anahe/anake, ano, ata, atu, haere, hanga, hangehange, harukiruki, hawerewere, he, hengahenga, hitarari, hitenga, hoake, hoatu, hoki, ia, iho, kaha, katoa, kau, ke, kehokeho, kenekene/keneuri, kere, kerekere, kino, kita, kitakita, koa, koia, kutikuti, mai, maioio, makehua, makuare/makuware, manunu, marie, matua, morukaruka/moruka, mea ake, na, nawenawe, nei, noa, nge, ngero/ngerongero, ngihangiha, ora, oreore, oti, pai, paku, panuku, patere, pea, penu, petapeta, piropiro, pohapoha, pu, puahoaho, puku, ra, ranei, rawa, rere, rikiriki, rirerire, riro, rukaruka, rukiruki, rukuruku, tahi, taiahoaho, tangetange, tangotango, tata, tere, tiahoaho, tika, tino, tokitoki, tonu, tuauriuri, uriuri, wawe, whaka-, whakaharahara, whakarere, whaioio.” (Syndetics summary)

Tikanga Māori : living by Māori values / Hirini Moko Mead.
“This is an authoritative and accessible introduction to tikanga Maori for people wanting to understand the correct Maori ways of doing things. It covers the ways that tikanga guides relationships between people, people’s relationship with the natural environment, spiritual areas, and health, and it proposes guidelines to test appropriate tikanga Maori responses to new situations and challenges in contemporary life.” (Syndetics summary)

Toitū̄ te whare / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“A collection of articles exploring the role and significance of whare tipuna and marae as sources of traditional and ancestral knowledge, and of the richness of te reo Maori language and literature.
“Ko te kaupapa o te whare tipuna me te marae, he pupuri i nga korero tuku iho a te iwi mai ano i nga tipuna. He wahi hai wananga tahi i nga kaupapa. Ki te kore o tatau whare tipuna me o tatau marae ka ngaro atu tetahi wahi nui tonu o tatau, te iwi Maori. No reira, me kaha tonu tatau ki te whakapakari i a tatau ano, kia mohio pai ai tatau ki nga tikanga i runga i o tatau marae hai huarahi whakatairanga i to tatau reo rangatira. Ki te mau te reo ki roto i o tatau whare tipuna, ki te mau hoki ki te marae ka mau ki nga wahi katoa. Ko te tino putake o tenei pukapuka a Toitu te Whare he titiro atu ki nga papareanga o muri mai kia hangaia he pataka korero ma ratau, he whakatutu atu i nga heru herehere i nga ihoiho o tuawhakarere hai whakatipu whakaaro ma ratau.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWayfinding leadership : ground-breaking wisdom for developing leaders / Chellie Spiller, PhD, Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, John Panoho.
“This book presents a new way of leading by looking to traditional waka navigators or wayfinders for the skills and behaviours needed in modern leaders. It takes readers on a journey into wayfinding and leading, discussing principles of wayfinding philosophy, giving examples of how these have been applied in businesses and communities, and providing action points for readers to practise and reflect on the skills they are learning.” (Syndetics summary)

New treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“Provides a timely examination of how the resolution of land claims in New Zealand has affected Mori law and the challenges faced by indigenous peoples as they attempt to exercise self-determination in a post colonial world. Combinind analysis with Mori storytelling, Jones’s nuanced reflections on the claims process show how Western legal thought has shaped treaty negotiations.” (Syndetics summary)

Maiea te tupua : whānau accounts of Waikato-Maniapoto World War One veterans and one conscriptee : commemorating 100 years of World War One / produced by Pūrekireki Marae with the support from Te Pua Wānanga ̄ki te Ao of the University of Waikato, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, the Maniapotō Māori Trust Board, Trust Waikato and Te Puni Kōkiri.
Accounts by family members of: Te Rauangaanga Mahuta, Kohatu Hari Hemara Wahanui, Tuheka Taonui Hetet, Te Rehe Amohanga, Rotohiko Michael Jones, Joseph Ormsby, William Takoro Kohi.

Syndetics book coverIndigenous homelessness : perspectives from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand / edited by Evelyn J. Peters, Julia Christensen.
“Being homeless in one’s homeland is a colonial legacy for many Indigenous people in settler societies. The construction of Commonwealth nation-states from colonial settler societies depended on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands. Essays … argue that effective policy and support programs aimed at relieving Indigenous homelessness must be rooted in Indigenous conceptions of home, land, and kinship, and cannot ignore the context of systemic inequality, institutionalization, landlessness, among other things, that stem from a history of colonialism…” (Syndetics summary)

Journal articles:

AlterNative ; vol. 12, issue 4 (2016)
p. 341 Te Mata Ira : faces of the gene : developing a cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research involving Māori by Maui Hudson […et al.]
p. 356 Ngā reanga o ngā Tapuhi : generations of Māori nurses by Leonie Walker, Jell Clendon, Leanne Manson & Kerri Nuku.
p. 369 A cause for nervousness : the proposed Māori land reforms in New Zealand by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 380 E Hine : talking about Māori teen pregnancy with government groups by Anna Adcock, Beverley Lawton & Fiona Cram
p. 396 Indigenous positioning in health research : the importance of kaupapa Māori theory-informed practice by Elana Curtis.

Whanake Taiao = Environmental Sustainability: Matariki events at Central Library

Matariki 1 JuneOn the four Wednesdays in June, Wellington City Libraries is presenting a series of four events around Whanake Taiao = Environmental Sustainability, at the Central Library, 12.30 pm.

1 June:  Rev. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh – Guide to a thriving future : putting United Nations Sustainable Development Agreement to work for NZ

8 June:  Jessica Hutchings – Hua parakore: kaupapa Māori food sovereignty:  including soil health and composting.

15 June:  Sarah Adams, Cenna Lloyd – Urban agriculture: fruit trees & bees

22 June:  Fred Allen – Matariki celebration of rongoā Māori and native plant remedies

Puanga kai rau. Ka Hua ai ngā pua, koia ko Puanga. =
An abundance of food at Puanga, when the blossoms become fruit, that is Puanga.

orions-matariki

Matariki ahunga nui

More about each event:

Wed 1 June: Rev. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh
For the next 15 years, the United Nations will expand on its kaupapa of 17 major goals set out in a strategy which has been accepted by all nations, September 2015 and which is based on the Millennium Development goals (2000-2015) – find out more about this here: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/

In earlier talks at the Central Library, this year, we have heard of the need for clean water (goal 6) and life below water ( 14) but each one of the 17 goals covers an aspect of life at a basic community level – i.e. each one of these goals affects you, and me, in our every day living. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh, a committee member of UNANZ Wellington Branch, retired from a career as a biological sciences research professor to spend the last 20 years in the USA as a social engaged Zen Buddhist.  Rosalind is driven by her experiences, globally, to embrace these kaupapa as pivotal to growing and maintaining healthy local communities.

Matariki 8 June8 June: Jessica Hutchings
jessica-hutchingsHere is Jessica’s recent publication: Te mahi māra : hua parakore – a guide to Māori organic growing.  This book is an amazingly indepth guide to organic gardening, with chapters on a Māori World View, soil and composting, planting, harvesting, rongoā, beekeeping, hens and house cow, and even recipes for using your produce.   You will find an introductory profile here:  http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/sunday/audio/201782628/dr-jessica-hutchings, and here: http://www.foodconference.co.nz/14-15th-february-2015/conference-info/dr-jessica-hutchings/

“Dr. Jessica Hutchings, is from the tribe of Ngai Tahu and is also of Gujarati, India descent. Dr Hutchings is an academic, kaupapa Māori researcher and a Hua Parakore grower.   Dr. Hutchings is actively involved with Te Waka Kai Ora (the National Maori Organics Authority) as a grower; a lead researcher on a three-year research project to develop a tikanga based indigenous verification and validation system for food and agriculture – called Hua Parakore…” (Food Matters conference profile).

Matariki 15 June15 June:  Sarah Adams & Cenna Lloyd

Sarah Adams, Community & Neighbourhood Advisor and Urban Agriculture Advisor at WCC will describe the growing of fruit trees within our city boundaries: there is further information on the Council webpages here: wellington.govt.nz/services/environment-and-waste/environment/urban-agriculture.

Cenna Lloyd from Local Flavour Urban Honey Company will describe beekeeping tips for the city – here is one of the suburban bus stops (Khandallah) portraying the Bee Friendly city.

Bus-Stop-7th-day-front-content

You can see more beekeeping tips on wellington.govt.nz

Matariki 22 juneWed 22 June: Fred Allen
FredallenIn an expansion of his theme, Fred will present his thoughts on Rongoā Māori and native plant remedies within traditional and contemporary paradigms, and subsequent contemporary medicinal developments. Fred Allen is a Rongoā Māori practitioner, New Zealand native herbal medicinal product manufacturer and specialist New Zealand native plant horticulturist. Fred has participated in the NZ Health and Wellness Industry for over 30 years and has invested in development of personal specialist expertise in native flora, NZ biodiversity, ethno botany, phytochemistry and therapeutics of NZ endemic and indigenous herbal medicine.  He identifies and separates his work within both Māori and Western paradigms. He was invited by the South Korean Government to represent New Zealand at the World Traditional Medicine Expo during 2011.

Fred is of Te Atiawa descent, his rohe is Te Whanganui-a-Tara, and he is Managing Director of www.kiwiplants.co.nz and www.kiwiherbs.com.

Matariki