Listen to the Ruth Gotlieb oral history

Ruth Gotlieb with Jane Hill and John Stears You can now listen to interviews with Ruth Gotlieb on our website, detailing her fascinating life; growing up in Ireland and emigrating to Australia then New Zealand. The oral histories include an in-depth discussion of her 27 year career serving as a councillor and board member, with the Wellington City Council, the Wellington Regional Council, the Wellington Harbour Board and the Capital & Coast District Health Board.

Ruth Gotlieb’s honours include having the library in Kilbirnie renamed Ruth Gotlieb Library, being awarded a Queen’s Service Order in 1995, and named Wellingtonian of the year in 2010. Ruth has contributed many hours volunteering with numerous organisations and as Justice of the Peace, and continues to do so to this day.

Check out the oral histories here – Ruth Gotlieb oral history page.

(Pictured: Ruth Gotlieb with Jane Hill (Manager, Community Networks) and John Stears (Libraries & Community Spaces Manager) at the page launch)

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Clark Spaggeerg’s Truth Hunt – A Webseries

A local webseries was recently shot by brothers Callum and Oli Devlin. First episode ‘The Call Of The Hunt’ caught our attention with the Kilbirnie Library playing a dystopian supervillain. We wanted to know more so got in touch with the creators for the lowdown.

Here’s the first episode, a link to their youtube channel, and the Q&A is below:


How did you get into making films?

Callum: We started making films on our parents home video camera when we were kids. Mostly they were morality tales or Monty Python rip-offs or fight scenes and what not. Just making them to amuse ourselves and get out of the house. It’s just a great way to tell stories.

Oli: Also, the Lord of the Rings, and the Matrix were pretty big childhood influences. We were exactly the right age for the Star Wars prequels too, so we’d be making little movies and animations with our action figures in the garden.

Can you give us a short bio about yourselves?

Callum: I’m studying Fine Arts at Massey in Wellington, and am a member of the theatre group PlayShop who performs at Paramount Cinemas every Friday night.

Oli: I’m at the NZSM doing Sonic Arts, which is pretty much musical composition – with computers.

We have watched the first episode and loved it. In your words could you please explain to us why you decided to make it?

Callum: We had this character of Clark kicking around from a film we’d made for our brothers 21st a few years ago. The original was an exposé about our brother that was really more about us. It was hands down the best thing we’d ever made, and we just couldn’t leave such dynamite comedy potential just sitting around like an idle duck. So we brought him back.

Oli: We wanted to do something huge, a vast web of conspiracy and intrigue, but seen through the eyes of hyper imaginative man-child. Like what happens when you take that crazy paranoid world Clark lives in, and make it real.

Once it was out there, did you get any unexpected reactions?

Callum: No kooky stories, just a lot of genuine surprise from people, even the cast. This series raises more questions than it answers, and Clark is just such a unique character that I think can be initially pretty baffling.

Oli: I expected people to be a bit baffled, yeah, but it seems there are some people who like it a lot, which is so great. It’s rather strong flavored.

Can you tell us a bit more about why you chose to film in a library; what’s your relationship with libraries?

Callum: Part of our show is set five years into the future, where Libraries are controlled and locked away from the public. Libraries are so often taken for granted as a public resource for information, so what was interesting for us is what happens when that gets taken away. They can hold secrets, and become as valuable and precious as a bank vault.

Oli: I love the idea of Librarians in the future being supervillains.

What’s the future for your webseries and film-making?

Callum: We have two more episodes of Clark Spaggeerg for this season (episode #2 comes out on Thursday [7/11], #3 the week after) which is the focus for now. We’ve planned a full kind of series arc, with plenty more story to tell, so hopefully this season is intriguing enough for people to want to see more. Otherwise, we’re always writing and developing new projects that excite us.

Oli: Our next film is a psychological horror-short we made with a small crew of guys from this film, and we’ll be letting that one out in December.

Do you have any music/films/blogs recommendations?

Callum: I just rewatched Billy Wilder’s Sabrina which is just a lock as my favourite film ever. Also, if you’re looking for honest, entertaining and critical discussions about film and television check out baddassdigest.com.

Oli: Definitely Baddass Digest and Film Critic Hulk, also openculture.com which is really consistently good – all the great free stuff on the web. I also listen to a lot of podcasts, Nerdist Writers Panel, WTF with Marc Maron, and Harmontown.

Anything else to add?

Callum: Making films is a lot easier than you think it is and just completely the most fun ever. I don’t understand why everybody isn’t doing it. It doesn’t have to be a big deal, and you don’t need permission, just go do it.

Knit-in at Kilbirnie Library

knit in 3It was a rather wet day last Saturday which was just perfect for our first knit in.  We had a nice friendly bunch of people that gathered to knit, chat, check out our knitting books and drink cups of tea.  We had a few international knitters and it was interesting to see although people knit all over the world there are different techniques. The Knit-in ran from 11am-3pm and we had knitters between the ages of 6-86 from beginners to experts.

Thanks to all the knitters who came along and if you missed out don’t dispair we will be holding another knit in on Saturday 22nd July from 11am-3pm.

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Meet Kate Spencer, author of Being Daisy

Kate Spencer Car Image croppedListen to Kate Spencer, author of Being Daisy, talk about her life and how she came to find her one love – writing.
Born in the South West of England, Kate attended Teacher Training College where she majored in French. She started writing in the seventies while raising three young children. Since her first published letter to Woman’s Weekly, she has been writing widely, as well as acting and directing. Arriving in New Zealand in 1996, Kate now lives and works on the Kapiti Coast as a freelance writer.
All Roads Lead to Rome is the title of her talk and covers books she has written awaiting publication, and the writing process involved in Being Daisy.
Kate will be at the Ruth Gotlieb Library, Kilbirnie, on Thursday 7th April at 6.30pm