Wellington Regional Secondary Schools Kapa Haka Competition

On Thursday 2 July after many weeks and months of practicing, Wellington Secondary Schools will have their opportunity on stage to be selected to represent the region at the National Secondary Schools Kapa Haka Competition to be held at the Pettigrew Arena in Hawke’s Bay next July.

The regional event is being held at Te Rauparaha Arena in Porirua and Te Reo Irirangi Māori o Te Ūpoko o Te Ika are broadcasting the entire competition. Click here and scroll down to the Upoko o te Ika link to listen to the competition on line.

Kapa Haka
Unidentified Maori women in traditional kapa haka performance dress, including puipui and poi, location unknown. Whites Aviation Ltd :Photographs. Ref: WA-25309-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22633364

Our Māori Resource pages have some great resources if you are interested in waiata Māori and I have also included some titles on waiata and other Kapa Haka related topics.

Click here for a digital copy of Sir George Gray’s Waiata Māori collection Ko Nga Waiata Maori he mea kohikohi mai, i tera kaumatua i tera kuia, no ona haerenga, e mahi ki nga pito katoa a Aotea-roa. Because of the rarity of the Wellington City Libraries’ original copy, a digitisation process has allowed us to present the book in an electronic format. Note that the spelling and grammar used by the publisher has been retained in this online version. Some of the spellings used were written phonetically or are based on incorrect interpretations of a spoken word.

Click here to search our Waiata Database which is an index of waiata from sources held by Wellington City Libraries, including Sir Apirana Ngata’s Ngāa Mōteatea. This database is a work in progress, and in time we will also include the library’s collection of CD or DVD recordings of waiata.

Syndetics book coverNgā mōteatea : he maramara rere nō ngā waka maha / he mea kohikohi nā Sir Apirana Ngata = The songs : scattered pieces from many canoe areas / collected by Sir Apirana Ngata.

Syndetics book coverKia Rōnaki = The Māori performing arts / edited by Rachael Ka’ai-Mahuta, Tania Ka’ai & John Moorfield.
In the last thirty years there has been an explosion of interest in the Maori performing arts but until now there has been no general book written in English or Maori about the Maori performing arts by Maori authors and exponents of the various genres. This new work, brings together the expertise of a range of performance artists and academics, consolidating their knowledge into a comprehensive single volume that will be of relevance to all those interested in the Maori performing arts.

Syndetics book coverNgā tatangi a te whare karioi = That special place where uniquely Māori sounds are created / Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival, Tauranga Moana, Mātaatua.
“Nga Tatangi a Te Whare Karioi captures the diverse realities of iwi represented by kapa haka groups performing at Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival 2009. Festival chairman Selwyn Parata describes the book featuring selected groups and their performance compositions – as a ‘must-have’ for aspiring composers and those dedicated to te reo Maori and the Maori performing arts. This is a limited edition publication.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWaiata : Maori songs in history : an anthology / introduced and translated by Margaret Orbell. “In this new anthology Orbell places waiata of the nineteenth century in their social and political setting, conveying the poet’s responses to their people’s trauma.” (abridged back cover)

Syndetics book coverThe Maori action song : waiata a ringa, waiata kori, no whea tenei ahua hou? / Jennifer Shennan. “This book is a discussion of Maori action songs, the dance form which, from modest beginnings in the early decades of the twentieth century, has developed into what is effectively the national dance of New Zealand. Through many hundreds of compositions, the action song has become an important medium of communication for many Maori people. A number of the earliest action songs are remembered and performed as classics up to 60 years later. They include simple love ditties and notably the songs of proud farewell and the joyous sad welcomes to soldiers returning from both World Wars. Recent developments have taken the action song away from the simplicity of its earliest form with borrowed European melodies, to more sophisticated compositions including dramatic effects with interpolated haka rhythms. New gestures are devised to express a widening range of themes and ideas, and these are worked into the style which has become conventionalised. It is this process-the instinctive moulding of innovated movement into the aesthetically acceptable dance style-which makes absorbing study.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNgoingoi Pēwhairangi : an extraordinary life / Tania Ka’ai.
“This is a significant biography. Ngoingoi Pewhairangi was a loved and respected Maori leader who was born on the cusp of te ao kohatu (the old Maori world) and the beginning of some significant changes in contemporary Maori society, and who utilised knowledge from both worlds throughout her entire life. From Te Whanau-a-Ruataupare hapu at Tokomaru Bay, Ngoi dedicated her adult life to supporting these people and influencing their lives to ensure a better future for Maori society. She was passionate about people and the advancement of Maori society and demonstrated this through her involvement in a variety of initiatives from Maori education, Maori language, Maori performing and traditional arts, Maori politics and within her own whanau. Accompanied by a CD of music composed by Ngoingoi, this book is a celebration of Ngoi’s life through the testimonies of many people who knew her using their own words. The bilingual text allows people to come to know what a truly remarkable mother she was to so many people in Aotearoa/New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival – Live web stream at Central Library

Nau mai, haere mai ki Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui. Matakuikui ana mātou o te whare pukapuka nei ki te whakapāho atu i te whakataetae o ngā mahi ā Tānerore, ā hine Rēhia, arā, Te Matatini. Kei te papatū o te peka mātua o ngā wharepukapuka i te taone nei ka tū te pouaka whakaata nui, ka āhei koe ki te mātaki i te tuku arorangi ā-ipurangi, ki te whai hoki i ngā mahi o Te Matatini.

Rāmere 6th – Rāhoroi 7th Poutūterangi, 11:00am – 2.00pm
Rātapu 8th Poutūterangi 1:00pm – 4:00pm
(Wellington Central Library, 65 Victoria Street, Wellington)

Every two years the top kapa haka performers from New Zealand and Australia compete to be crowned ‘the best of the best’. Te Matatini Kapa Haka Aotearoa and Waitaha rohe are proud to be presenting Te Matatini 2015. The festival started in 1972 and is now the world’s largest celebration of Māori traditional performing arts, attracting over 30,000 performers, supporters and visitors. The theme this year is “He Ngākau Aroha” which expresses the appreciation to all who gave their support to Christchurch after the earthquakes.

Wellington Central Library are pleased to announce that we will screen live web stream on the Plasma Screen which will be located on the ground floor. This year the competition is in Ōtautahi (Christchurch). This is the first year that the entire competition is to be fully televised, that’s every kapa (group), every haka, every poi and every waiata-a-ringa (action song), all televised live. Come and view some of the live action during your lunch break or while you’re in town.

Friday 6th March and Saturday 7th March between 11:00am – 2:00pm and
Sunday 8th March while we are open at the Central Library.

Check out this video to get a taste of what Te Matatini is all about.

Full Te Matatini coverage details and live web stream are available from Māori Television

Here are some books available on our catalogue about Kapa Haka and Te Matatini

Syndetics book coverKa mau te Wehi = Taking haka to the world : Bub & Nen’s story / as told to Bradford Haami [by Ngapo Wehi and Pimia Wehi]. Ngapo and Pimia Wehi, affectionately known as Bub and Nen, have achieved what no other partnership has accomplished in a lifetime of kapa haka – Maori performing arts. With over a century of combined experience in Maori song and dance, leading teams and teaching, they are recognised as New Zealand’s foremost leaders in this ever-expanding arena, having won six national kapa haka championships, twice as the leaders of The Waihirere Maori Club (1965-1981) and four times with Auckland kapa haka team Te Waka Huia (1981-2011). They have taken their brand of haka to the world performing everywhere from Broadway to Korea and from Fiji to the Taj Mahal. (Abridged syndetics)

Syndetics book coverKia Rōnaki = The Māori performing arts / edited by Rachael Ka’ai-Mahuta, Tania Ka’ai & John Moorfield.
In the last thirty years there has been an explosion of interest in the Maori performing arts but until now there has been no general book written in English or Maori about the Maori performing arts by Maori authors and exponents of the various genres. This new work, brings together the expertise of a range of performance artists and academics, consolidating their knowledge into a comprehensive single volume that will be of relevance to all those interested in the Maori performing arts.(syndetics)

Syndetics book coverNgā tatangi a te whare karioi = That special place where uniquely Māori sounds are created / Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival, Tauranga Moana, Mātaatua.
“Nga Tatangi a Te Whare Karioi captures the diverse realities of iwi represented by kapa haka groups performing at Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival 2009. Festival chairman Selwyn Parata describes the book featuring selected groups and their performance compositions – as a ‘must-have’ for aspiring composers and those dedicated to te reo Maori and the Maori performing arts. This is a limited edition publication.” (syndetics)

Paraire Tomoana, NZ Music Month Feature

Welcome to May and to NZ Music Month! We have some exciting things lined up for you on the He kōrero o te wa blog, so make sure you keep an eye out! I would like to kick off NZ music month here with a small feature about a beloved and well-known Māori composer, Paraire Henare Tomoana. This blog post is not only about one of New Zealand’s best-known and loved Māori composers; it is also about someone close to my whanaunga, and it is my greatest pleasure to share with you here a summarised biography, taken from teara.govt.nz:

Paraire Henare Tomoana was born in either 1874 or 1875 in Hastings. Paraire belonged to Ngati Te Whatu-i-apiti and Ngati Kahungunu; through his father he had links to the hapu Ngati Hawea, Ngati Hori, Ngati Te Rehunga and others, and through his mother, to Ngai Te Ao, Ngati Hinepare, and Ngati Hinetewai. His mother and father were both prominent Māori leaders in Hawkes Bay and, inheriting illustrious lineage from both parents, Paraire was destined for leadership.

te aute

Te Aute College, Waipawa County. Alexander : Photographs of Te Aute College. Ref: 1/1-013163-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23029536

He attended Te Aute College, where he became a prefect and captain of the school. At school, he was a contemporary of Sir Apirana Ngata, with whom he remained firm friends and whom he also supported politically.

san

Apirana Turupa Ngata. New Zealand Ilustrated Magazine [1899]. Ref: PUBL-0091-1899-001. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23013034

Paraire was also a formidable athlete, representing Hawkes Bay in rugby, tennis, cricket and hockey, and Turanga in golf. For over ten years, he remained the undefeated champion of the New Zealand Māori golf tournament. In 1904 he was appointed coach of the All Blacks. Paraire married twice. His first marriage had ended by 1912 and in 1913 he married Kuini Ripeka Raerena, aged 19 and one of eight children of Taare Raerena (Ryland), a farmer of Ngati Porou, and Harata Akuhata-Brown (Paraone). These were my great-great-great-grandparents. Kuini was the sister of my great-great-grandmother, Celia Raerena. Paraire had courted Kuini by singing his own composition, the love song ‘Pokarekare ana’, to her and her Ngati Porou elders on Te Poho-o-Rawiri marae. There were four sons and four daughters of this marriage, and Paraire also had an adopted son.

tpor

Te Poho-o-Rawiri. Gordon, Peter John Te Otene, fl 1970. First meeting of the Takitimu Maori Council, in front of the second Poho o Rawiri Meeting House. Ref: 1/2-044563-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23041348

Paraire was a pioneer composer of songs in the new ‘action song’ style, moving away from classical waiata which used small note ranges, no harmony and irregular metre. Instead, he wrote words to fit harmonised tunes written in diatonic scales and generally deriving from European songs, the rhythms adapted to fit Māori idiom. One of his best-known songs was ‘Te ope tuatahi’; others are still among the most popular Māori songs in New Zealand. During WWI, Paraire helped raise funds for the Maori Soldiers’ Fund by organising a song and dance group (Te Poi o Heretaunga) which performed at Waimatatini, Wellington, Trentham and Auckland. They performed many of his compositions, including Hoea Ra Te Waka Nei, and E Pari Ra (1918 – the famous tangi for soldiers lost in battle). Other well known songs written by Paraire were ‘Tahi nei taru kino’, ‘I runga i nga puke’, ‘Hoki hoki tonu mai’ and the haka ‘Tika tonu’. As well as composing action songs, Paraire was an accomplished writer and translator, a commentator on ancient waiata, and was well versed in Maori history and lore. In 1946 he suffered a stroke and died on 15 April. He was survived by Kuini, who died in 1984, four daughters, three sons and his adopted son. He is buried in the Waipatu cemetery at Hastings.

(This biography is summarised and paraphrased from www.teara.govt.nz. The full text is available here and is well worth a read; I recommend you take a look!!)

Te Ara Biography:

Angela Ballara. ‘Tomoana, Paraire Henare – Tomoana, Paraire Henare’, from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 30-Oct-2012

We have some resources about Paraire Tomoana here at the Central Library:

A century of Maori song : a collection of words and music for 56 traditional and contemporary Maori songs of 20th century. Volume one. He koha : a gift of Māori music / [compiled by] Blossom Taewa and Stuart Pearce.

We also have a range of CDs ($1 for one week), featuring songs written by Paraire and performed by more recent artists:

Waiata Maori : a festival of Maori song / sung and narrated by Inia Te Wiata. Reo : he waiata Maori hou o Aotearoa = contemporary Maori songs of New Zealand. The voice [sound recording] / Teddy Tahu Rhodes. Whisper you all the way home [sound recording] / 2003/224 New Zealand Secondary Students’ Choir. The young Kiri [sound recording] : the early recordings, 1964-70.