Tā moko

Tattooing seems to be a flavour of the month. There is a beautifully illustrated book of over 20 tattooists – including artists of tā moko, and tatau. As well, there are theses by Rawinia Higgins and Ridgely Dunn.

Syndetics book coverMai i te kākano / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Mai i te Kākano aims to help Māori language speakers and learners sustain more animated, in-depth conversations in Māori. It gives examples of alternative and fun ways to say things in everyday situations. Included are sections on Māori idiom and metaphor, common errors, useful phrases, and examples of language in use in a vaiety of settings, including in the home, at the supermarket, at the beach, and on the sports field”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverTū / nā Patricia Grace ; nā Wiremu rāua ko Te Ohorere Kaa i whakamāori.
“The only survivor of three young men who went to war from his family, Tū faces the past and tells his niece and nephew, through the pages of his war journal, what really happened to the brothers as the Māori Battalion fought the war in Italy”–Publisher information. This is the Te Reo version of Patricia Graces’ narrative of the story of Tu.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand tattoo : in the home of the tattooist’s art / Chris Hoult ; text by Steve Forbes” [This book] presents the view from a cross-section of tattoo studios in 2012. Featuring photography of the tattooists and the tattooed, it profiles over 20 leading artists and gives insights into both the history and the renaissance of all three traditions: tā moko (Māori tattoo), tatau (Pacific Islands tattoo) and tattoo (European and Asian forms)”.–back cover.

Syndetics book coverIf I only had time / John Rowles with Angus Gillies.
“Here [John Rowles] speaks candidly with Angus Gillies, noting the tremendous achievements as well as the pressures and mishaps along the way. An irrepressible optimist, John tells a story that’s full of humour and is hard to put down.”–inside jacket. An easy read, but fascinating tale of the boy from Kawerau who made it to London, Las Vegas, Hawai’i and everywhere in between.

Syndetics book coverArt New Zealand ; no. 144 (Summer 2012-13)
p. 52. Waharua kopito : Māori cloaks at Te Papa by Peter Ireland.

(Kahu ora = living cloaks)-
“Fautlessly crafted by curator Awhina Tamarapa, Kahu ora manifests what was made plain by her scholarly accessible, beautifully designed and produced book, Whatu kakahu / Maori cloaks published last year – where eight specialist pooled their knowledge to give the most comprehensive account to date of this key strand of Maori culture”–p. 52-3.(Te Papa )

Historical review (Bay of Plenty journal of history) ; vol. 60, no. 2 ; (November 2012)
p. 49. Saving Te Urewera heritage by Dean Flavell
p. 52. Mataatua wharenui : the long journey home by Dr Ian Shearer
p. 55. Te Koputu a Te Whanga a Toi, Whakatane Library and Exhibition Centre

Five Theses:
Village of peace, village of war : Parihaka stories 1881-2004 / Rachel Anne Buchanan.

Conceptualising wairuatanga : rituals, relevance and realities for teachers : a dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Teaching and Learning in the University of Canterbury / by Gipsy Foster.

Poia mai taku poi : unearthing the knowledge of the past : a critical review of written literature on the poi in New Zealand and the Pacific : a thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / Karyn Ailsa Paringatai.
The primary objective of this thesis is to review literature written about poi in order to construct an historical overview of poi from pre-contact Māori society until the 1920s. The mythological and Polynesian origins of poi, traditional and contemporary materials and methods used to make poi, early travellers, explorers, and settlers accounts of poi and two case studies on the use of poi in the Taranaki and Te Arawa areas will be included in this thesis. The information will be used to show the changes in poi that have occured since Māori and European arrival to New Zealand until the 1920s.

He tānga ngutu, he Tūhoetanga te Mana Motuhake o te tā moko wāhine: the identity politics of moko kauae : a thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / by Rawinia R. Higgins.
Tā moko (Māori tattooing), especially facial moko (tattoo), has become a popular mechanism for the expression of self determination. Many Māori people are adopting this art form as part of a renaissance of Māori culture in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This declaration of Māori self-determination is also an assertion of the pride felt by the tangata whenua (people of the land) for their culture, their language and more, importantly, their identity. This thesis will illustrate how moko kauae (female chin tattooing) is a means of expressing Māori identity with specific reference to Tūhoe identity. Using an Indigenous theoretical framework this Māori Studies thesis examines the historical and contemporary political dimensions of moko kauae, the interface with the Māori worldview (inclusive of its cultural concepts), and its relationship to identity politics. This will be complimented by the personal stories of Tūhoe women who have undertaken moko kauae as well as commentaries from other Tūhoe people who express what their Tūhoetanga means to them and their lives.

Challenging appropriation : modern moko and western subculture / by Ridgely Dunn.

Re-colonisation and indigenous resistance : neoliberalism in the Pacific / Ema Maria Bargh.