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Keep ’em guessing – New eBook Fiction in March

Do you ever wonder about your neighbours? Sure, they look normal, but everyone’s got a secret or two. Several of this month’s new releases on Overdrive address this very question, including Marina Lewycka‘s latest novel, The Lubetkin Legacy. Add in great new crime fiction set in Belfast and Detroit, and you’ll have enough mystery to keep the whole street guessing!

Overdrive cover The Lubetkin Legacy, by Marina Lewycka
“North London in the twenty-first century: a place where a son will adopt an old lady to impersonate his departed mother, rather than lose the council flat. A time of golden job opportunities, though you might have to dress up as a coffee bean or work as an intern at an undertaker. A place rich in language – whether it’s Romanian, Russian or buxom housing officers talking managementese. Marina Lewycka is back in this hilarious, farcical, tender novel of modern issues and manners.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Telex from Cuba, by Rachel Kushner
“Fidel and Raúl Castro are in the hills, descending only to burn sugarcane plantations and recruit rebels. Rachel K. is in Havana’s Cabaret Tokio, entangled with a French agitator trying to escape his shameful past. Everly and K.C. are growing up in the dying days of a crumbling American colony, about to discover the cruelty and violence that have created their childhood idyll.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly, by Adrian McKinty
“Belfast 1988: a man has been shot in the back with an arrow. It ain’t Injuns and it isn’t Robin Hood. But uncovering exactly who has done it will take Detective Inspector Sean Duffy down his most dangerous road yet, a road that leads to a lonely clearing on the high bog where three masked gunmen will force Duffy to dig his own grave.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer
“Nine-year-old Oskar Schell is an inventor, amateur entomologist, Francophile, letter writer, pacifist, natural historian, percussionist, romantic, Great Explorer, jeweller, detective, vegan and collector of butterflies. When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he discovers in his father’s closet. It is a search that will lead him through New York, history and himself towards some kind of peace.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Flea Palace, by Elif Shafak
“Bonbon Palace was once a stately apartment block in Istanbul. Now it is a dilapidated home to ten wildly different individuals. There’s a womanising, hard-drinking academic with a penchant for philosophy; a ‘clean freak’ and her lice-ridden daughter; a lapsed Jew in search of true love; and a charmingly naïve mistress. When the garbage at Bonbon Palace is stolen, a mysterious sequence of events unfolds that result in a soul-searching quest for truth.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover My Sister’s Bones, by Nuala Ellwood
“Kate Rafter is a high-flying war reporter. She’s the strong one. The one who escaped Herne Bay and their father. Her sister Sally didn’t. Instead, she drinks. But when their mother dies, Kate is forced to return to the old family home. And on her first night she is woken by a terrifying scream. What secret has Kate stumbled upon? And is she strong enough to uncover the truth . . . and make it out alive?” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Mackenzie’s Mountain, by Linda Howard
“Mary Elizabeth Potter is a self-appointed spinster with no illusions about love. When she meets Wolf Mackenzie, a man with a chip on his shoulder the size of Wyoming, she sets out to convince the whole town he’s a man worth loving. But Wolf’s not sure he’s ready for the taming of Wolf Mackenzie.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Fear, by Dirk Kurbjuweit
“Randolph insists he had a normal childhood, though his father kept thirty loaded guns in the house. Now he has an attractive, intelligent wife and two children, enjoys modest success and has just moved into a beautiful flat in a respectable part of Berlin. Life seems perfect—until his wife, Rebecca, meets the man living in the basement below. Their downstairs neighbour is friendly at first, but soon he starts to frighten them—and when Randolph fails to act, the situation quickly spins out of control.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover August Snow, by Stephen Mack Jones
“Tough, smart, and struggling to stay afloat, former detective August Snow is the embodiment of Detroit. It’s not long before he’s summoned to the home of business magnate Eleanore Paget, who wants August to investigate the increasingly unusual happenings at her private wealth management bank. August declines, and a day later, Paget is dead. What begins as an inquiry into Paget’s death soon drags August into a rat’s nest of Detroit’s most dangerous criminals.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton
Cry the Beloved Country is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its contemporaneity, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry the Beloved Country is a work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Prophetic insights – New eBook Fiction

What will 2017 bring? It’s hard to say with certainty, but perhaps some clues lie in this month’s new releases from Overdrive. Will there be drama and mystery as seen in The Paris Librarian? Tragedy and conflict as portrayed by Even in Paradise? Or the dark humour of The Unthinkable Thoughts of Jacob Green? For more prophetic insights, sign up now!

Overdrive cover The Unthinkable Thoughts of Jacob Green, by Joshua Braff
“Jacob Green doesn’t mean to disappoint his family, but he can’t help thinking the most unthinkable (and very funny) thoughts. If only he could confront his overbearing father and tell him he doesn’t want to sing in synagogue, attend est classes or write the perfect thank-you note. But, of course, he can’t. That would be unthinkable.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Forty Rooms, by Olga Grushin
“A modern woman will inhabit forty rooms in her lifetime. They form her biography, from childhood to death. For our protagonist, the first rooms she is aware of are those that make up her family’s Moscow apartment. We follow this child as she leaves home to study in America, and discovers sexual happiness and love. But her hunger for adventure will open up more ambiguous rooms, rooms full of ghosts and unknown trade-offs.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover One Hundred Twenty-One Days, by Michèle Audin
“This debut novel by mathematician and Oulipo member Michèle Audin retraces the lives of French mathematicians over several generations through World Wars I and II. The narrative oscillates stylistically from chapter to chapter—at times a novel, fable, historical research or diary—locking and unlocking codes, culminating in a captivating, original reading experience.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Dying Trade, by Peter Corris
“Meet Cliff Hardy. Smoker, drinker, ex-boxer. And private investigator. When the wealthy Bryn Gutteridge hires Hardy to help his sister, it looks as if blackmail is the problem. Until the case becomes more brutal, twisted and shocking than even Hardy could have guessed. Described by The Age as ‘a quintessentially Australian literary icon.'” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Even in Paradise, by Elizabeth Nunez
“Peter Ducksworth, a Trinidadian widower of English ancestry, retires to Barbados. He decides to divide his land among his three daughters while he is alive, his intention not unlike that of King Lear. But Lear made the fatal mistake of confusing flattery with love, and so does Ducksworth. Feeling snubbed by his youngest daughter, Ducksworth decides that only after he dies will she receive her portion of the land, setting in motion the very strife he hoped to prevent.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Paris Librarian, by Mark Pryor
“Hugo Marston’s friend Paul Rogers dies unexpectedly in a locked room at the American Library in Paris. The police conclude that Rogers died of natural causes, but Hugo is certain mischief is afoot. As Hugo delves into the library’s stacks, he begins to hear rumours about a famous actress, a recently donated collection and a dagger. But to uncover the truth, he must return to the scene of a decades-old crime.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Some Women, by Emily Liebert
“Annabel Ford has everything under control, but when her husband announces that he’s leaving, she’s blind-sided. Piper Whitley has done her best to balance it all—raising her daughter Fern by herself while advancing her career. Only now that she’s met the man of her dreams, Fern’s absentee father shows up, throwing everything into a tailspin. Mackenzie Mead has many reasons to count her blessings, but with an imperious mother-in-law and a husband with whom she can no longer connect, something has to give.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Bohr Maker, by Linda Nagata
“Nanotechnology saturates the world, but strict laws regulate its use, and death follows for those caught in violation. The threat of death means little though, to a man already condemned to die. Nikko—post human, desperate to escape his fate—steals a forbidden nanomachine. But the theft goes awry and the nanomachine escapes into the wild–igniting a desperate race to contain it before the definition of ‘human’ changes for all time.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad
Heart of Darkness tells the story of Charles Marlow, an English man who journeys into the African jungle. The difference between Conrad’s novella and other classic adventure fictions, like Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, is that Heart of Darkness goes beyond classic motifs to explicitly deal with questions of racism, exploitation and colonization. Readers ultimately understand that the darkness of the title does not only stand for the horrors in the African wilderness, but for the cruelty of the colonizer’s heart.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

New eAudiobook Fiction in October

Have you ever wondered what Star Wars would sound like if it had been written by Shakespeare? Or maybe you’ve suspected Jane Austen was really an undercover detective? Perhaps you’ve even wanted to hear your favourite author reading in the food court of the local mall? If you answered yes to any of these questions, the latest eAudiobooks on Overdrive are for you. Even if you didn’t, we’ve got a wide range of other titles, so sign in here to start your search!

Overdrive cover Reputations, by Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“Javier Mallarino is a living legend. He is his country’s most influential political cartoonist, the consciousness of a nation. But this all changes when he’s paid an unexpected visit from a young woman who forces him to re-evaluate his life and work, questioning his position in the world. Reputations examines the weight of the past, how a public persona intersects with private histories and the surprises of memory.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover William Shakespeare’s Star Wars, by Ian Doescher
“Return once more to a galaxy far, far away with this sublime retelling of George Lucas’s epic Star Wars in the style of the immortal Bard of Avon. The saga of a wise (Jedi) knight and an evil (Sith) lord, of a beautiful princess held captive and a young hero coming of age, Star Wars abounds with all the valor and villainy of Shakespeare’s greatest plays.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Losing It, by Emma Rathbone
“Greenfield has a problem: she’s twenty-six years old and she’s still a virgin. Sex ought to be easy. People have it all the time! But, without meaning to, she made it through college and into adulthood with her virginity intact. Something’s got to change. Losing It is about the blurry lines between sex and love, and trying to figure out which one you’re going for. And it’s about the decisions—and non-decisions—we make that can end up shaping a life.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Gone with the Mind, by Mark Leyner
“Gone with the Mind is the story of Mark Leyner’s life, told as only Mark Leyner can. In this utterly unconventional novel, Mark gives a reading in the food court of a mall. Besides his mother, who’s driven him to the mall, and a few employees of fast food chain Panda Express, the reading is completely without audience. The action of Gone with the Mind takes place exclusively at the food court, but the territory covered on these pages has no bounds.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Fort, by Bernard Cornwell
“Summer 1779, a British force of fewer than one thousand Scottish infantry were sent to build a garrison in the State of Maine. The War of Independence was in its third year and the State of Massachusetts was determined to expel the British. But when they sent a fleet of 40 vessels to ‘captivate, kill and destroy’ they underestimated their enemies, calm in battle and ready for victory. Based on diaries, letters and court transcripts.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas, by Stephanie Barron
“Christmas Eve, and Jane Austen and her circle are in a celebratory mood. Jane, however, discovers holiday cheer is fleeting. One of the Yuletide gathering dies in a tragic accident whose circumstances Jane immediately views with suspicion. If the accident was in fact murder, the killer is one of her fellow snowbound guests. Whom can Jane trust to help her stop the killer striking again?” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover All the Missing Girls, by Megan Miranda
“It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared without a trace. Back again to care for her father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched. With twists and turns that lead down dark alleys and dead ends, Megan Miranda leaves us wondering just how far we would be willing to go to protect those we love.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Time’s Legacy, by Barbara Erskine
“Abi, a recently-ordained priest, is appointed to the parish of the charismatic but fundamentalist Kier. He objects to her mysticism, her practice of healing in particular. When she sees a vision, Kier accuses her of witchcraft, but Abi soon sees more visions; an entire Roman family history, dark with betrayal and a promise of bloody revenge. Abi must battle the approaching terror along with her own personal demons…” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

New Other Genre novels for January: This month humour & satire

Humour, Satire, and Black Comedy novels feature in this month’s Other Genre selections. Highly recommended is the debut novel from Australian writer Mark Lamprell , The Full Ridiculous, a humourous novel about love, family and the difficult business of being a man.

Syndetics book coverLet the games begin / Niccolo Ammaniti ; translated from the Italian by Kylee Doust.
“The world might be in the throes of a global recession but when an author on the brink of despair, an enigmatic musician, a supermodel, and a Satanic sect meet with the cream of Italian high society at the home of a Roman property tycoon, the world outside the mansion’s walls is soon forgotten.” (Adapted from Book cover)

Syndetics book coverGood news, bad news / Maggie Groff.
“Intrepid investigative journalist Scout Davis has given herself a holiday, but when Hermione Longfellow floats towards her in the supermarket wanting to engage her services she stops to listen. Most people in Byron Bay are aware of the eccentric Anemone sisters. Always dressed in black, they rarely leave their home nestled in the hills, but Scout is sure that the drinking of chicken blood is just idle gossip. When Hermione asks Scout to track down sister Nemony’s AWOL husband, believed to have died at sea thirty years ago, but recently popped up again on the Great Barrier Reef, Scout, checking there is no eye of newt in Hermione’s shopping trolley, jumps at the chance.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverHappy Eva After / Chris Harrison.
“As a teacher at the Fawlty Towers of London language colleges, Sebastian Pink is accustomed to confusion caused by the complexities of the English language. Married to Sarah, a career woman who has long been a total workaholic but is now desperate for a baby, Sebastian feels ambivalent about becoming a parent. Sarah has effectively been absent from his life for so long that they’ve grown apart and these days his social life has come to revolve around his work; walking his dog, Claude; and his obsessive daily completion of the cryptic crossword.
When an alluring Czech student called Eva becomes one of Sebastian’s students and inadvertently provides him with the last solution in his morning crossword, he finds himself drawn into a sordid suburban tangle based mainly on his own misinterpretations and feverish imagination.” (Adapted from Book cover)

Syndetics book coverGoldblatt’s descent / Michael Honig.
“Dr Malcolm Goldblatt has one last chance in the NHS. As the new but temporary senior registrar of a London hospital, he needs to prove to himself, and the medical establishment, that he can toe the corporate line. But this new hospital is all rather depressingly familiar, from Dr Madic’s ferocious aversion to work, Dr Burton’s knife-in-the-back ambition, right up to the pathologically insecure yet monstrously vain Professor Small, it is an environment of short tempers, back-biting and office politics, a place in which caring for patients seems secondary to caring for professional reputations. As Goldblatt attempts to hold on to his job in the medical chaos of Floor Five he finds himself sinking dangerously towards a point of no return, where it feels as though self-abnegation is killing him and self-destruction seems like the only remedy.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverMan vs child / Dominic Knight.
“As a stand-up comedian with a career that’s taking off, it was easy to walk away from his girlfriend’s ultimatum: comedy or kids. But now he’s starting to feel like he’s the last man standing while all his friends are switching socialising for baby wipes. Sure, his mates are still wide awake at 3am with a bottle in their hand, but now it’s for a very different reason. Dan reckons he spends enough time with spoiled brats in his day job wrangling a breakfast radio duo known as Bry Dynamite and Silly Sally. He can’t understand why everyone’s giving up their social lives for creatures who express themselves through loud, irritating noises and bodily fluids. But at least it’s giving him material for a new comedy show, Man vs Child. Then Penny, the woman who broke his heart in high school, walks back into his life.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverThe full ridiculous / Mark Lamprell.
“Michael O’Dell is hit by a car. When he doesn’t die, he is surprised and pleased. But he can’t seem to move from the crash position. He can’t concentrate, or control his anger and grief, or work out what to do about anything much. His wife Wendy is heroically supportive but his teenage children don’t help his post-accident angst: daughter Rosie punches out a vindictive schoolmate and all hell breaks loose; son Declan is found with a stash of illicit drugs. A strange policeman starts harassing the family and ordinary mishaps take on a sinister desperation. To top it all off, Michael’s professional life starts to crumble. Sometimes you can’t pull yourself together until you’ve completely fallen apart.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverThe good house / Ann Leary.
“Hildy Good is a realtor in Wendover, the little Massachusetts town where she’s lived her entire life. Suffering from alcoholism and marital problems, Hildy’s always in search of distractions. Emboldened by a self-professed ability to read people-bordering on what she considers ESP-Hildy finds the intrigue she’s been looking for when Boston hedge fund owner Brian McAllister and his wife, Rebecca, move to town. With her characteristic vigilance, Hildy soon uncovers a burgeoning affair between Rebecca and a local psychiatrist. As confidante, blackmailer, and real-estate broker to both Rebecca and Peter, the psychiatrist who rents the upstairs office, Hildy’s entanglements not only threaten the lives of others but also tease out her own problems and self-delusions.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe yellow eyes of crocodiles / Katherine Pancol ; translated by William Rodarmor and Helen Dickinson.
“Josephine Cortes abruptly realizes she needs to get a grip on her unraveling life when her husband leaves her to start a crocodile farm in Kenya with his mistress. Left to raise two daughters one sweet and loving, the other haughty and disdainful of her frumpy mother on the barely-there salary of a researcher who specializes in the twelfth century, Jo hesitantly ponders her life and purpose. Despite the shock of the disintegration of her 16-year marriage, she still falls back on her lifelong habit of being the whipping girl for everyone else, from her coldly perfectionist mother, Henriette, to her selfish, sophisticated sister, Iris. She even agrees to a wild scheme to pen a twelfth-century romance that will funnel the money to her shrunken coffers but carry Iris’ name on the cover. The story really takes off when the novel becomes a surprise hit, which opens up entirely new complications for everyone involved.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRoll with it / Nick Place. “Sure, he may have been returning fire, but the fact remains that Laver is the sixth Victorian policeman to shoot a suspect in four months, and that’s all the politicians need to get involved. While the circus of an inquiry begins, Laver is moved from Major Crime to the Mobile Public Interaction Squad, aka the mountain bike police. Bitter, struggling to cope with the fatal shooting not to mention his flailing relationship, Rocket is now wearing lycra and getting a sore butt on his bike seat. Laver’s friends and bosses in the force tell him to keep his head down until the storm blows over, but that doesn’t factor in Stig and the Wild Man, two genuine bad guys Laver encounters on Smith Street, Collingwood. In inner-city and outer-suburban Melbourne, major crime is in the air. Lives might be in danger but nobody will listen to a cop on the outer.” (Adapted from Amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverWhat in God’s name : a novel / Simon Rich.
“God truly created man in his own feckless image: “With that whole mankind thing?” the CEO of Heaven Inc. admits, “I bit off way more than I could chew,” and decides to destroy the Earth and finally realize his lifelong dream of opening an Asian-American restaurant. Only Craig and Eliza, two angels working in the Department of Miracles, seem to care, so God tells them if they can answer just one prayer in a month, he’ll keep the Earth open for business. Unfortunately, the challenge is to unite Sam Katz and Laura Potts, two pining, painfully shy 23-year-olds living blocks apart in Manhattan. Prohibited from doing anything the humans could perceive as supernatural, the angels’ meddling is restricted to dream-work, iPhone hacking, traffic signal tampering, weather manipulation and, in overweight Sam’s case, a botulism attack.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)


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