John Miller – in conversation about his historic photographs of the Māori Land March

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Photographer John Miller with one of his photographs of the Māori Land March when it arrived in Wellington on October 13 1975. John was photographed at Te Unga Waka Marae in Auckland, at the commemorations of the 40th anniversary of the March in September 2015. Credit: John Miller

Acclaimed documentary photographer John Miller (Ngāpuhi) has documented social and political dissent and cultural events for more than four decades.  John photographed the Wellington section of the 1975 Māori Land March; from Porirua to its arrival at Parliament grounds.  The photographs have become well-known following their reproduction in books, exhibitions and school resources. In this session, John will talk with Paul Diamond about his photographs of the Māori Land March, and his involvement with the march organisers, Te Roopu o te Matakite.

A Wellington City Libraries talk, organised in partnership with the National Library, as part of the Turnbull Gallery exhibition, ‘Not one more acre’: The Māori Land March 40 years on.

Supported by LIANZA Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui regional group.

When: 12.30-1.30pm, Wednesday 21 October
Where: Ground floor, Wellington Central Library
Cost: Free

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The Māori Land March on the Wellington motorway, October 13 1975.
Credit: John Miller

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina : a biography of Whina Cooper / Michael King.

Syndetics book coverRaupatu : the confiscation of Māori land / edited by Richard Boast and Richard S. Hill.

Not One More Acre: A Conversation with Ans Westra at the Central Library

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This October marks the 40th anniversary of the 1975 Māori Land March – when Dame Whina Cooper lead marchers to Parliament to protest the loss of Māori lands. “Not One More Acre of Māori Land” became the catch-cry of the marchers, who left Te Hāpua in the far north on 14 September as a group numbering no more than 50, and eventually reached Wellington on 13 October as a powerful hikoi numbering at over 5000.

Iconic photographer Ans Westra captured this event and on Tuesday 6 October Wellington Central Library will be hosting a talk with this renowned and well-loved photographer, who will describe her experience of attending and photographing the historic march. From Thursday 1st October there will also be an exhibition of contact sheet prints of Ans Westra’s photographs of the arrival of the march in Wellington on 13 October 1975.

A Conversation with Ans Westra
Tuesday 6 October at 12.30pm
2nd floor, Central Library

Syndetics book coverWashday at the pa / photographs by Ans Westra ; with text by Mark Amery.
Washday at the pa, by New Zealand premier photographers Ans Westra, was first published as a photo-story booklet in 1964 by the Department of Education for use in Primary Schools, but all 38,000 copies were withdrawn following a campaign by the Maori Women’s Welfare League that it would have a ‘detrimental effect’ on Maori people – and that the living conditions portrayed within the book were atypical. A second edition of the booklet was published the same years with some images omitted. This edition is a selection of these two editions together with photographs of the washday family taken in 1988, and includes essays by arts critic, journalist and broadcaster Mark Amery detailing the controversy and background of Washday at the pa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNga tau ki muri = Our future / Ans Westra.
“This timely and visionary new book includes 137 Westra photographs of the New Zealand landscape, with text contributions from Hone Tuwhare, Russel Norman, Brian Turner, David Eggleton and David Lange, who wrote a short piece for Ans as part of an unrealised book project in 1987. Well known for her iconic black and white documentation of Maori culture, Ans Westra is also known for her colour works, which show concern for New Zealand’s destiny, “an island exploited by various waves of settlement”. Shot with Ans’ trusty Rolleiflex camera, the sometimes damning images in Our Future have been made over the last 20 years. “The purpose of the book is to give a directive to the country, an awareness of things changed and lost within its short history. If we don’t plan for the long term and keep taking stop-gap measures, we leave very little behind. Instead of becoming like the rest of the world, this beautiful place should become a shining example of hope for survival in a newly balanced environment.” –Ans Westra.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina [videorecording] : mother of the nation.
“The autobiography of Maori land activist Dame Whina Cooper filmed two years before she died. Born in an earth-floor whare she became a teacher, gum digger, rugby coach, midwife, a tribal leader, president of Maori Women’s Welfare League and controversial leader of the Maori Land March. Who organized her first public protest at the age of 18.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHandboek : Ans Westra photographs / [exhibition curator and coordinator, Luit Bieringa ; texts, Cushla Parekowhai [et. al]].

Ans Westra [videorecording] : private journeys/public signposts / director, Luit Bieringa ; producer, Jan Bieringa.
New Zealand photographer, Ans Westra, talks about her career.

Starting Soon – Ni Hao Chinese Stories & Rhymes

StoriesandRhymes Launch Poster MEDIUMNi Hao Children’s Community Stories & Rhymes provides a time for parents and children to play and learn Mandarin as a Second/Foreign Language together through stories, fun rhymes and action songs. It’s also a great opportunity to hear and use Mandarin in a welcoming and social environment.

Starting from Thursday 9 July 2015, these free sessions are held weekly at the Wellington Central Library children’s area (near the big window by the waterfall), Thursdays, 10 to 10:30am. 

Stories & Rhymes! sessions are led by teachers from the Ni Hao Children’s Community Charitable Trust, and designed for Mandarin for Speakers of Other Languages (MSOL) families who are wanting to learn the language as a second/foreign language.  Fluent Mandarin speakers would also enjoy these sessions! These Stories & Rhymes! sessions are a great introduction to the Mandarin language and a very small taster of our fun class programmes.

Parents and children are most welcome to hang around and mingle in the library’s children’s area after the session has finished.

See you at Stories & Rhymes!

(bookings not required)

What’s coming up at the library?

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Our events calendar is boiling over at the moment, here’s a list to help you keep on top of what’s coming up over the next fortnight. All events are free and all are welcome. Our usual Pre-School Story Times, Book Clubs and Baby Rock ‘n’ Rhyme sessions are all still happening too.

Thursday May 22nd

Amiria Grenell – Central 12pm
Wellington Musician Amiria Grenell performs free over the lunch hour in celebration of New Zealand Music Month.

Poetic Voices of Africa – Central at 6pm

Come and join us for an evening of African poetry with Poetic Voices of Africa. A line-up of six African poets from Ethiopia, Kenya and South Sudan, and American poets from Georgia, Hawaii and Washington DC will come together to perform their poetry in the lead up to the Africa Day celebrations on 24 May. The session will be introduced and concluded with a drum performance from Sam Manzanza.

Friday May 23rd

Andy Gibson – Central 5pm
Wellington Musician Andy Gibson performs free in celebration of New Zealand Music Month.
Free Art Workshop – Newtown 6pm
Wellington Artist Marg Elliot shares her drawing knowledge in this one hour workshop.
Harriet And The Matches – Newtown 7pm
A late-night double feature at Newtown, Wellington Musicians Amiria Grenell and Jessie Moss reunite their band a free, one-off performance.

Monday May 26th

John McIntyre presents a session on Reluctant Readers – Cummings Park (Ngaio) 6:30pm
Children’s book commentator and Kilbirnie’s Children’s Book Shop owner John McIntyre returns to our Westrern Libraries to present this session on how to get your reluctant readers onto the books.

Tuesday May 27th

Kōhunga Kōrero – Whāngaia tō Tama Toa ki te pānui pukapuka – Miramar at 9:30
Pre-school Story Time in Te Reo Māori.

Thursday May 29th

Maika – Central 12pm
Wellington Musician Mahinarangi Maika performs as Maika for free over the lunch hour in celebration of New Zealand Music Month.

Friday May 30th

Free Art Workshop – Newtown 6pm
Wellington Artist Marg Elliot shares her knowledge of shading, tone and texture in this free one hour drawing skills workshop.

Whare tapere 2014

Whare Tapere, an annual event established by Ōrotokare, is set to take place next Saturday 22 February at Waimangō Farm, Hauraki. The event is open to the public, and celebrates indigenous performing arts and whare tapere –pā based houses of storytelling, dance, games, music, entertainment and much more, which fell into disuse following the move from pā villages to the new townships in the 19th century.

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Tākaro at Whare Tapere (photo by Regan Balzer)

This year’s event includes performances in te reo Māori of karetao (puppetry), tākaro (Māori games), waiata and an innovative, contemporary kapa haka.
It will also premiere ‘Whenua’ – a choreographed performance work with music composed by Te Ahukaramū for piano, taonga pūoro and voice.

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Karetao at Whare Tapere (photo by Regan Balzer)

Make sure you check back at He Korero o te Wa next week for a blog post by our own talented Al Fraser, who will be performing at Whare Tapere, with all the news from this year’s event.

History for Lunch! Wednesdays, 12.30-1.30pm during August at the Central Library

Wellington Harbour by Barraud tiny

On Wednesdays from 12.30-1.30pm during the month of August, the Central Library will be hosting a series of history talks covering the social, urban and Māori history of Wellington. Have a read of the programme below, and come along!

Wednesday 7 August: The Flight to South Karori: How Katherine Mansfield’s family coped with life and death in the time of cholera (1890-93) by Redmer Yska Notable Wellington historian Redmer Yska uncovers the extraordinary story of Wellington’s cholera epidemic and the associated flight of the Beauchamp family out of the city, along with many other members of Wellington’s middle-class. The story also covers the political battles that waged between influential forces as the city struggled to gain the means to rectify the situation.

Wednesday 14 August: Te Upoko o te Ika, 1840s: A Struggle over Power, Mana and Resources by Hēni Collins Presented by the researcher, writer and journalist, Hēni Collins, this illustrated talk will cover a period of history in Te Whanganui a Tara/ Wellington Harbour and the Kapiti Coast during the mid-19th century. It was a time when the mana of Te Rauparaha, Te Rangihaeata and allied tribes was undercut by English settler ambition and then eventually backed up by the heavy hand of the British military. This represented a huge shift in access to land, economic resources, power and cultural dominance in the region. Ka mate ka ora! The siprit of Te Rauparaha / Hēni CollinsHēni Collins is the author of Ka mate ka ora! : the spirit of Te Rauparaha (Steele Roberts, 2010). The story of Te Rauparaha and his times continues to intrigue, provoke and inspire Maori and Pakeha alike. In this book Collins describes Te Rauparaha’s life from the time his birth was foretold, through inter-tribal conflict, migration, settlement in the south (Kapiti Island), and into the period of colonization. Signed copies of the book will be available for sale at the conclusion of this talk

Wednesday 21 August: Radical Wellington: Philip Josephs, the Freedom Group & the Great Strike of 1913 by Jared Davidson Jared Davidson, archivist and author of Sewing Freedom, will be talking about the colourful radicals of the early labour movement in Wellington – anarchists and the Industrial Workers of the World. As well as organising one of New Zealand’s first anarchist collectives, Josephs and members of the IWW were active in Wellington’s working-class counter culture and the Great Strike of 1913. This talks aims to highlight the role of literature, meetings and international influences in these events. Signed copies of Jared Davidson’s book Sewing Freedom will be available for sale for $15 at the conclusion of the talk (sorry; no eftpos) Whatu kākahu = Māori cloaks / edited by Awhina Tamarapa.

Wednesday 28 August: He tohu aroha – the protective role of Māori cloaks by Awhina Tamarapa Awhina Tamarapa edited and contributed to the book Whatu Kakahu which arose from the outstanding exhibition at Te Papa,  Kahu ora : living cloaks (June-Otober, 2012). Of special interest to Wellingtonians will be the history of the cloak of Ruhia Porutu, deposited into the care of Te Papa by the whānau of Henry Pitt.  This is the beautiful kākahu that saved the life of Thomas Wilmore McKenzie in 1840 who had arrived in Wellington as a teenager on board one of the first settler ships. McKenzie went on to become a prominent Wellington citizen but never forgot the debt he owed to Ruhia Porutu and the two families maintained a life-long friendship. Awhina Tamarapa (Ngati Kahungunu, Ngati Ruanui, Ngati Pikiao) is a curator of Maori artifacts at Te Papa.  She holds a Bachelor of Maori Laws and Philosophy from Te Wananga o Raukawa, Otaki, and a Bachelor of Arts from Victoria University, Wellington, where she majored in Anthropology.

History For Lunch

Law for Lunch at Ruth Gotlieb – Kilbirnie Library – Benefit Reforms: What everybody needs to know

Welcome to the seminar of Law for Lunch at the Kilbirnie Branch Library!
Our speaker this week will be Kahureremoa Aki, Community Lawyer at the Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley.
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Kahureremoa Aki is the Rōia Hāpori (Community Lawyer) providing legal services to Māori at Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley. She has helped many families with questions about social security.
Kahu will be focussing on:

• Youth and young parents
• Budgeting and incentives
• Being “work available”
• The DPB and children
• Social obligations
• Drug testing
• Penalties and exemptions

Come along to find out more about the Welfare Reforms and the changes, scheduled to come into effect this July.
Ask your questions about social obligations, dependent children and health issues, beneficiaries who refuse to apply for drug-tested jobs or any concerns you might have related to benefit reforms.

This presentation will take place this Wednesday, from 12 noon to 1pm, at the Ruth Gotlieb Kilbirnie Library.
All welcome!

For more information, please check our online event calendar

Celebrate Matariki!

Matariki 2012

In Pipiri/June each year, the star cluster Matariki (Pleiades) appears in our dawn skies.

The Maori New Year begins with the sighting of the first new moon after the first appearance of Matariki. This year it occurs on 21 Pipiri/June.

Traditionally Matariki marks the end of the harvest and the beginning of the planting season. Today Matariki means celebrating the unique place we live in, and giving respect to the land we live on.

Festivities differ from iwi to iwi but for most New Zealanders, Matariki is a time of remembrance, hospitality and new beginnings.

Matariki is a time for inward reflection and renewal. It is a time to consider the year ahead and make plans to improve our lives and enhance our communities. It is a chance to come together and share knowledge and skills.

There are a number of exciting events and activities happening at our libraries and around the city to celebrate Matariki.

Check out:

From the library’s collection:

New Zealand International Arts Festival – Germaine Greer

The New Zealand International Arts Festival is currently on here in Wellington with many famous writers speaking at the events.

Germaine Greer, author of The Female Eunuch, and Shakespeare’s Wife, and more, is speaking at three of these events.

The events are Town Hall Talks: Germaine Greer on the 12th of March, Germaine Greer: Shakespeare’s Wife with Linda Hardy on the 13th of March, and Where Were You in ’72? with Marilyn Waring and Sandra Coney on 14th of March.

Wellington City Libraries has many interesting books by Germaine Greer you may wish to read or reserve.

The obstacle race : the fortunes of women painters and their work / by Germaine Greer.
“If men and women are equally capable of genius, why have there been no female artists of the stature of Leonardo, Titian or Poussin? In seeking to answer this question, Germaine Greer introduces us to major but underestimated figures in the history of Western painting–Angelica Kauffmann, Natalia Goncharova, Suzanne Valadon, Berthe Morisot, Kathe Kollwitz–and produces a brilliantly incisive and richly illustrated study. She explains the obstacles as both external and surmountable and internal and insurmountable in the race for achievement.” – (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverShakespeare’s wife / Germaine Greer.Shakespeare’s Wife
“In 1979, noted feminist Greer wrote The Obstacle Race: The Fortunes of Women Painters and Their Work, which helped save several women artists from obscurity. Now she turns her attention to another shadowy figure, Ann Hathaway. Greer wants to rescue Hathaway from the frantic fantasising of the bardolators, who would have us believe that Shakespeare left Stratford for London in order to escape an unhappy marriage. Maybe, and since the cupboard is so bare of facts, Greer can do no more than speculate herself. But her speculation is based on careful sifting through every shard of contextual evidence archives, records, registers, and literary works not just as it relates to the Shakespeares and the Hathaways but also as it relates to their place and time. What we get is a portrait of life in Stratford circa 1600 on almost every level and in every aspect the practice of medicine, the brewing of ale, birth, marriage, and burial. Although Ann herself remains in the shadows, Greer provides an intriguing analysis that helps us understand more about the person Ann might have been. Reader interest probably will be based more on the author’s name than on the subject.” – (Booklist Summary)

Syndetics book coverThe beautiful boy / Germaine Greer.
“The beauty of male imagery as an object of female desire has been repressed, argues feminist writer Greer in this work of art history. She includes some 200 images from Western art in her exploration of the shifting meanings and presentations of masculinity.” – (Book News summary).

Syndetics book coverThe female eunuch / Germaine Greer.
“A worldwide bestseller, translated into over twelve languages, THE FEMALE EUNUCH is a landmark in the history of the women’s movement. Drawing liberally from history, literature and popular culture, past and present, Germaine Greer’s searing examination of women’s oppression is at once an important social commentary and a passionately argued masterpiece of polemic. Probably the most famous, most widely read book on feminism ever.” – (Summary from Amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverWhitefella jump up : the shortest way to nationhood / Germaine Greer.
“Essay exploring the interdependence of black and white Australia to suggest that embracing Aboriginality is the only way Australia can fully imagine itself as a nation. Argues that Australia needs to enter the Aboriginal web of dreams. Includes correspondence by Tim Duncan, Evan Thornley, John Quiggen, Graham Jones, Gideon Haigh and Tim Flannery. Author is Professor of English and Comparative Studies at the University of Warwick. Her previous titles include ‘The Female Eunuch’ and ‘The Whole Woman’.” – (Syndetics summary)

The Change : women, ageing and the menopause.
“Challenges the medical, religious and social myths surrounding menopause. The author argues that acceptance and understanding of this critical life stage will lead to serenity and female empowerment. By the Australian-born author of TThe Female Eunuch’, it includes an index and a bibliography.” – (Syndetics summary)

Daddy, we hardly knew you / by Germaine Greer.
“Driven to know if the father who returned from World War II a cold and vacant man had loved her once, feminist Greer ( The Female Eunuch, LJ 4/15/71) follows a trail of false leads and outright lies to know the truth about the man who called himself Reg Greer. To the dismay of her sharp-tongued, eccentric mother, but to the pleasure of herself and her siblings, she finds someone who, concealing his origins in poverty and illegitimacy, rises to middle-class security on the strength of his own wit and resourcefulness. Some of the writing is marred by Greer’s fascination with the minutiae of herself, but the search and its results are intriguing.” – (Library Journal Summary)

The whole woman / Germaine Greer.
“Germaine Greer proclaims that the time has come to get angry again! Modern feminism has become the victim of unenlightened complacency, and what started out in the Sixties as a movement for liberation has become one that has sought and settled for equality. With fiery rhetoric, authoritative insight, outrageous humour and broad-ranging debate, Greer shows that, although women have indeed come a very long way in the last thirty years, the notion of our having it all has disguised the persistent discrimination and exploitation that continues to exist for women in the basic areas of health, sex, politics, economics and marketing. Erudite, eccentric, provocative and invigorating, Germaine Greer once again sets the agenda for the future of feminism. Here is all the polemical power that sold over a million copies of The Female Eunuch and kept its author at the heart of controversy ever since. The Whole Woman was a No. 1 Sunday Times bestseller for five weeks when it was first published in 1999, and was hailed by the critics as a ‘polemical bomb’ (Guardian) and as required reading for thinking adults everywhere.” – (Global Books Summary)

Slip-shod sibyls : recognition, rejection and the woman poet / Germaine Greer.
“The term “slip-shod sibyls”, adapted from a gibe of Alexander Pope, encapsulates the common contempt for the half-educated women who dared to expose themselves in the pre-1900 literary market-place. In this collection, Germaine Greer argues that the problem is not that such women were ignored but that, when most women were unable to express themselves in written form at all, and only a tiny minority dared to write in metre, the female poet was given undue attention, flattered and exploited only to be rejected and humiliated in her own lifetime and forgotten by posterity. She argues that what has come down to us is largely unworthy of inclusion in the canon. In many cases, the texts are inauthentic and cannot be relied upon to represent women’s work or women’s sensibility. As much of the poetry is intensely derivative, it cannot be evaluated by readers unfamiliar with the poets’ models. This study examines the life and work of an extraordinary group of women – from the myth of Sappho to the dishonesty of Katherine Philips, the enduring mysteries of Aphra Behn and the tragic tale of Letitia Landon, forced to masquerade as “The Child of Song”.” – (Amazon.com summary).

Other books that Wellington City Libraries have by Germaine Greer:

Sex and destiny : the politics of human fertility / Germaine Greer.

The madwoman’s underclothes : essays and occasional writings, 1968-85 / Germaine Greer.

Knit-in at Kilbirnie Library

knit in 3It was a rather wet day last Saturday which was just perfect for our first knit in.  We had a nice friendly bunch of people that gathered to knit, chat, check out our knitting books and drink cups of tea.  We had a few international knitters and it was interesting to see although people knit all over the world there are different techniques. The Knit-in ran from 11am-3pm and we had knitters between the ages of 6-86 from beginners to experts.

Thanks to all the knitters who came along and if you missed out don’t dispair we will be holding another knit in on Saturday 22nd July from 11am-3pm.

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