LitCrawl: True Stories Told Live at Central library

That’s right! It’s LitCrawl time again and that means it’s time to get excited because this year is going to be on a whole different level!

With the addition of LitCrawl Extended and events running across the whole weekend, starting on Friday 10th November all the way through to Sunday the 12th, it’s time to come into the library, grab your programme and start planning your crawl.

We will be hosting True Stories Told Live as part of LitCrawl Phase 1, starting at 6pm at the Central Library on Saturday November 11th.

This years theme is ‘Quiet Revolutions’. Totally unscripted, no power points or cue cards, just storytelling in its rawest form!

Featuring Makerita Urale, Witi Ihimaera, Hēmi Kelly, Renèe, Lucy Revill, Rajorshi Chakraborti and Eamonn Marra it’s going to be an unmissable event!

To help everyone get excited and pumped for their crawl, we’ve asked our librarians to share their recommendations. Just like True Stories Told Live, we just asked for everyone’s picks, no theme, no time, no parameters just Librarian’s choices, straight from the heart!

Syndetics book coverLinda’s Pick: Tess / Kirsten McDougall.
“In the silence she could hear the oncoming hum, like a large flock approaching. She didn’t want to hear his story; she’d had enough of them. Tess is on the run when she’s picked up from the side of the road by lonely middle-aged father Lewis Rose. With reluctance, she’s drawn into his family troubles and comes to know a life she never had. Set in Masterton at the turn of the millennium, Tess is a gothic love story about the ties that bind and tear a family apart.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJamie’s Pick: Crisis four : a Nick Stone thriller / Andy McNab.
“Ex-SAS trooper Nick Stone is clever, ruthless and very effective, it is no surprise that he is hired by British Intelligence. Sarah Greenwood is beautiful, intelligent and cunning, and the only woman Stone has ever truly opened up to. But now he has been ordered to hunt her down. Hotly pursued through the American wilderness, Stone finds himself at the center of a deadly game of cat and mouse and must get to the heart of a terrifying conspiracy theory to which only Sarah holds the key.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverFrith’s Pick: Iceland / Dominic Hoey.
“Aspiring musician Zlata meets graffiti artist and part-time drug dealer Hamish at a party. Together, they start to get their lives on track Zlata gets her record deal and album tour, and Hamish gets an exhibition of his art in Auckland, then in Tokyo. Then one of their group of friends kills someone, and everything starts to unravel as they deal (or not) with the aftermath” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTim’s Pick: Leave before you go / Emily Perkins.
No New Zealand novel better captures the sad ambience of finding yourself a little older than you feel ready for and also you’ve just locked yourself out of your flat again. In a good way.
“A generation’s dilemma: should we find real jobs & relationships & houses, or shall we sit here, watch TV & maybe think about going out later? Leave Before You Go is a witty novel from last year’s winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverReece’s Pick: The crossing / by Cormac McCarthy.
“In The Crossing, Cormac McCarthy fulfills the promise of All the Pretty Horses and at the same time give us a work that is darker and more visionary, a novel with the unstoppable momentum of a classic western and the elegaic power of a lost American myth.  An essential novel by any measure, this is a luminous and appalling book that touches, stops, and starts the heart and mind at once.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJess’ Pick: Daughter of the forest / Juliet Marillier.
“A tale of history and heritage, myth and magic, legend and love. Lord Colum of Sevenwaters is blessed with seven children, but it is Sorcha, the youngest and only daughter, who is destined to defend her family and protect their land. The only one who escapes the cruel influence of her father’s new wife, exiled and cast out into the forest and the terrifying world beyond, Sorcha falls into the hands of the feared enemy. Now she is torn between a life she has always known and a love that only comes once.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverZuhara’s Pick: Gone with the wind / by Margaret Mitchell.
“Often remembered for the epic film, Gone With the Wind explores the depth of human passions with an intensity as bold as its setting in the red hills of Georgia. This is the tale of Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled, manipulative daughter of a wealthy plantation owner, who arrives at young womanhood just in time to see the Civil War forever change her way of life. A sweeping story of tangled passion and courage, Margaret Mitchell brings to life the unforgettable characters that have captured readers for over seventy years.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPaul’s Pick: The unthinkable thoughts of Jacob Green : a novel / by Joshua Braff.
“It’s 1977, housewarming, Annie Hall and bar mitzvah parties punctuate Jacob Green’s childhood and require command performances by all the Green family members. Jacob doesn’t mean to disappoint his father, but he can’t help thinking the most unthinkable (and very funny) thoughts about public-school humiliation, Hebrew-school disinclination, and in-home sex education (with the live-in nanny!). This self-assured, comic, yet piercing first novel deftly captures the struggle of an imperfect boy trying to become a suitable son.” ( Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverBeth’s Pick: The English patient / Michael Ondaatje.
“Set during the end of World War II, this novel explores the lives of four very disparate people who find themselves holed up together in a ruined villa north of Florence as the war retreats around them. Michael Ondaatje is the author of Running in the Family and In the Skin of a Lion.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverLigia’s Pick: The book of disquiet / Fernando Pessoa ; edited by Jerónimo Pizarro; translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa.
“An “autobiography” or “diary” containing exquisite melancholy observations, aphorisms, and ruminations, this classic work grapples with all the eternal questions. Now, for the first time the texts are presented chronologically, in a complete English edition by master translator Margaret Jull Costa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSela’s Pick: The bronze horseman / Paullina Simons.
“The war has not yet touched this city of fallen grandeur, or the lives of two sisters, Tatiana and Dasha Metanova. Their world is turned upside down when Hitler’s armies attack Russia and yet there is light in the darkness. Tatiana meets Alexander, a brave young officer in the Red Army. Tatiana and Alexander’s impossible love threatens to tear the family apart and expose Alexander’s dangerous secret, a secret as devastating as the war itself.” (Syndetics summary)

 

Litcrawl 2017

Treaty talks at Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui in April/May

Wellington Treaty Network has joined with Wellington City Libraries in 2017 to host three events in April and May to commemorate the signing of Te Tiriti in Wellington Harbour, 1840.

We thank Robyn Kahukiwa for her kind permission to use her image created for the Haeata Collective exhibition at the City Gallery, 1990

We thank Robyn Kahukiwa for her kind permission to use her  image created for the Haeata Collective exhibition at the City Gallery, 1990.

The programme will be:

Rangtiratanga in reverse : the Government’s review of Te Ture Whenua Māori by Liz Mellish and Morrie Love

Friday 28 April, 12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Liz Mellish is chair of Palmerston North  Māori Reserve Trust, and Morrie Love is chair of the Wellington Tenths Trust.

Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill [update], is in its final step, due to become an act at the end of this month. We are pleased to host Liz Mellish, Federation of Māori Authorities representative on an advisory committee for the establishment of  the Māori Land Service,  and Morrie Love, who will attempt to guide us through the complex issues surrounding the  Te Ture Whenua Bill/Act.

Changing the narrative, the story of Māori law and Treaty of Waitangi claims and settlement, with Carwyn Jones

Friday 5 May,  12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Carwyn Jones, of Ngāti Kahungunu and Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki iwi,  is a senior law lecturer at Victoria University. His area of expertise is Te Tiriti O Waitangi, Māori Customary Law and Māori Land Use. We look forward to an opportunity to learn of the latest developments  on the claims and settlement processes.

Here is a link to Carwyn’s book, published recently in 2016:

Vic Uni Book CoverNew treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“While Indigenous peoples face the challenges of self-determination in a postcolonial world, New Treaty, New Tradition provides a timely look at how the resolution of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims continues to shape the culture of all who are involved – Maori and government alike.” (Syndetics summary)

Te Tiriti in schools and the community  :  new resources to support engagement with the Treaty ; a talk by Tamsin Hanly and Jen Margaret

Friday 12 May, 12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Jen Margaret is an author and a very respected and committed presenter of Treaty workshops, and workshops for organisational change.

Here is a link to her book Working as Allies: supporters of indigenous justice reflect on the Library Catalogue.

Tamsin Hanly will shortly launch her latest publication in the field of New Zealand education, and her colourful website includes: A Critical guide to Māori and Pākehā histories of Aotearoa New Zealand

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Enjoy the magical worlds of Roald Dahl these holidays!

The waiting is over! Here’s what’s happening in the July School Holidays at a library near you…

Due to the release of the movie The BFG and with 2016 being his 100th birthday, we are celebrating that amazing author – Roald Dahl.

He is many people’s favourite author and his books have become classics for a number of generations. Lots have been turned into movies too – The BFG, Fantastic Mr Fox, The Witches, Matilda…

During the school holidays kids can whizz-pop their way into a library for some whoopsy-splunkers fun! We will be exploring the life of Roald Dahl, learning Gobblefunk (the language of The BFG), competing in a clever matching game, and creating dream jars. Your kids will be frothbuggling if they miss this one.

Here’s the details:

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Thursday 14th July, 11am

Miramar Library: Friday 15th July, 2pm

Karori Library: Tuesday 19th July, 11am

Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library: Tuesday 19th July, 2pm

Central Library: Wednesday 20th July, 11am

Johnsonville Library: Thursday 21st July, 11am

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Friday 22nd July, 11am

Our School Holiday activities are suitable for 6-12 year olds and last one hour. They are free and bookings are not required – just turn up.

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John Miller – in conversation about his historic photographs of the Māori Land March

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Photographer John Miller with one of his photographs of the Māori Land March when it arrived in Wellington on October 13 1975. John was photographed at Te Unga Waka Marae in Auckland, at the commemorations of the 40th anniversary of the March in September 2015. Credit: John Miller

Acclaimed documentary photographer John Miller (Ngāpuhi) has documented social and political dissent and cultural events for more than four decades.  John photographed the Wellington section of the 1975 Māori Land March; from Porirua to its arrival at Parliament grounds.  The photographs have become well-known following their reproduction in books, exhibitions and school resources. In this session, John will talk with Paul Diamond about his photographs of the Māori Land March, and his involvement with the march organisers, Te Roopu o te Matakite.

A Wellington City Libraries talk, organised in partnership with the National Library, as part of the Turnbull Gallery exhibition, ‘Not one more acre’: The Māori Land March 40 years on.

Supported by LIANZA Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui regional group.

When: 12.30-1.30pm, Wednesday 21 October
Where: Ground floor, Wellington Central Library
Cost: Free

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The Māori Land March on the Wellington motorway, October 13 1975.
Credit: John Miller

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina : a biography of Whina Cooper / Michael King.

Syndetics book coverRaupatu : the confiscation of Māori land / edited by Richard Boast and Richard S. Hill.

Not One More Acre: A Conversation with Ans Westra at the Central Library

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This October marks the 40th anniversary of the 1975 Māori Land March – when Dame Whina Cooper lead marchers to Parliament to protest the loss of Māori lands. “Not One More Acre of Māori Land” became the catch-cry of the marchers, who left Te Hāpua in the far north on 14 September as a group numbering no more than 50, and eventually reached Wellington on 13 October as a powerful hikoi numbering at over 5000.

Iconic photographer Ans Westra captured this event and on Tuesday 6 October Wellington Central Library will be hosting a talk with this renowned and well-loved photographer, who will describe her experience of attending and photographing the historic march. From Thursday 1st October there will also be an exhibition of contact sheet prints of Ans Westra’s photographs of the arrival of the march in Wellington on 13 October 1975.

A Conversation with Ans Westra
Tuesday 6 October at 12.30pm
2nd floor, Central Library

Syndetics book coverWashday at the pa / photographs by Ans Westra ; with text by Mark Amery.
Washday at the pa, by New Zealand premier photographers Ans Westra, was first published as a photo-story booklet in 1964 by the Department of Education for use in Primary Schools, but all 38,000 copies were withdrawn following a campaign by the Maori Women’s Welfare League that it would have a ‘detrimental effect’ on Maori people – and that the living conditions portrayed within the book were atypical. A second edition of the booklet was published the same years with some images omitted. This edition is a selection of these two editions together with photographs of the washday family taken in 1988, and includes essays by arts critic, journalist and broadcaster Mark Amery detailing the controversy and background of Washday at the pa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNga tau ki muri = Our future / Ans Westra.
“This timely and visionary new book includes 137 Westra photographs of the New Zealand landscape, with text contributions from Hone Tuwhare, Russel Norman, Brian Turner, David Eggleton and David Lange, who wrote a short piece for Ans as part of an unrealised book project in 1987. Well known for her iconic black and white documentation of Maori culture, Ans Westra is also known for her colour works, which show concern for New Zealand’s destiny, “an island exploited by various waves of settlement”. Shot with Ans’ trusty Rolleiflex camera, the sometimes damning images in Our Future have been made over the last 20 years. “The purpose of the book is to give a directive to the country, an awareness of things changed and lost within its short history. If we don’t plan for the long term and keep taking stop-gap measures, we leave very little behind. Instead of becoming like the rest of the world, this beautiful place should become a shining example of hope for survival in a newly balanced environment.” –Ans Westra.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina [videorecording] : mother of the nation.
“The autobiography of Maori land activist Dame Whina Cooper filmed two years before she died. Born in an earth-floor whare she became a teacher, gum digger, rugby coach, midwife, a tribal leader, president of Maori Women’s Welfare League and controversial leader of the Maori Land March. Who organized her first public protest at the age of 18.” (Library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHandboek : Ans Westra photographs / [exhibition curator and coordinator, Luit Bieringa ; texts, Cushla Parekowhai [et. al]].

Ans Westra [videorecording] : private journeys/public signposts / director, Luit Bieringa ; producer, Jan Bieringa.
New Zealand photographer, Ans Westra, talks about her career.

Starting Soon – Ni Hao Chinese Stories & Rhymes

StoriesandRhymes Launch Poster MEDIUMNi Hao Children’s Community Stories & Rhymes provides a time for parents and children to play and learn Mandarin as a Second/Foreign Language together through stories, fun rhymes and action songs. It’s also a great opportunity to hear and use Mandarin in a welcoming and social environment.

Starting from Thursday 9 July 2015, these free sessions are held weekly at the Wellington Central Library children’s area (near the big window by the waterfall), Thursdays, 10 to 10:30am. 

Stories & Rhymes! sessions are led by teachers from the Ni Hao Children’s Community Charitable Trust, and designed for Mandarin for Speakers of Other Languages (MSOL) families who are wanting to learn the language as a second/foreign language.  Fluent Mandarin speakers would also enjoy these sessions! These Stories & Rhymes! sessions are a great introduction to the Mandarin language and a very small taster of our fun class programmes.

Parents and children are most welcome to hang around and mingle in the library’s children’s area after the session has finished.

See you at Stories & Rhymes!

(bookings not required)

What’s coming up at the library?

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Our events calendar is boiling over at the moment, here’s a list to help you keep on top of what’s coming up over the next fortnight. All events are free and all are welcome. Our usual Pre-School Story Times, Book Clubs and Baby Rock ‘n’ Rhyme sessions are all still happening too.

Thursday May 22nd

Amiria Grenell – Central 12pm
Wellington Musician Amiria Grenell performs free over the lunch hour in celebration of New Zealand Music Month.

Poetic Voices of Africa – Central at 6pm

Come and join us for an evening of African poetry with Poetic Voices of Africa. A line-up of six African poets from Ethiopia, Kenya and South Sudan, and American poets from Georgia, Hawaii and Washington DC will come together to perform their poetry in the lead up to the Africa Day celebrations on 24 May. The session will be introduced and concluded with a drum performance from Sam Manzanza.

Friday May 23rd

Andy Gibson – Central 5pm
Wellington Musician Andy Gibson performs free in celebration of New Zealand Music Month.
Free Art Workshop – Newtown 6pm
Wellington Artist Marg Elliot shares her drawing knowledge in this one hour workshop.
Harriet And The Matches – Newtown 7pm
A late-night double feature at Newtown, Wellington Musicians Amiria Grenell and Jessie Moss reunite their band a free, one-off performance.

Monday May 26th

John McIntyre presents a session on Reluctant Readers – Cummings Park (Ngaio) 6:30pm
Children’s book commentator and Kilbirnie’s Children’s Book Shop owner John McIntyre returns to our Westrern Libraries to present this session on how to get your reluctant readers onto the books.

Tuesday May 27th

Kōhunga Kōrero – Whāngaia tō Tama Toa ki te pānui pukapuka – Miramar at 9:30
Pre-school Story Time in Te Reo Māori.

Thursday May 29th

Maika – Central 12pm
Wellington Musician Mahinarangi Maika performs as Maika for free over the lunch hour in celebration of New Zealand Music Month.

Friday May 30th

Free Art Workshop – Newtown 6pm
Wellington Artist Marg Elliot shares her knowledge of shading, tone and texture in this free one hour drawing skills workshop.

Whare tapere 2014

Whare Tapere, an annual event established by Ōrotokare, is set to take place next Saturday 22 February at Waimangō Farm, Hauraki. The event is open to the public, and celebrates indigenous performing arts and whare tapere –pā based houses of storytelling, dance, games, music, entertainment and much more, which fell into disuse following the move from pā villages to the new townships in the 19th century.

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Tākaro at Whare Tapere (photo by Regan Balzer)

This year’s event includes performances in te reo Māori of karetao (puppetry), tākaro (Māori games), waiata and an innovative, contemporary kapa haka.
It will also premiere ‘Whenua’ – a choreographed performance work with music composed by Te Ahukaramū for piano, taonga pūoro and voice.

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Karetao at Whare Tapere (photo by Regan Balzer)

Make sure you check back at He Korero o te Wa next week for a blog post by our own talented Al Fraser, who will be performing at Whare Tapere, with all the news from this year’s event.

History for Lunch! Wednesdays, 12.30-1.30pm during August at the Central Library

Wellington Harbour by Barraud tiny

On Wednesdays from 12.30-1.30pm during the month of August, the Central Library will be hosting a series of history talks covering the social, urban and Māori history of Wellington. Have a read of the programme below, and come along!

Wednesday 7 August: The Flight to South Karori: How Katherine Mansfield’s family coped with life and death in the time of cholera (1890-93) by Redmer Yska Notable Wellington historian Redmer Yska uncovers the extraordinary story of Wellington’s cholera epidemic and the associated flight of the Beauchamp family out of the city, along with many other members of Wellington’s middle-class. The story also covers the political battles that waged between influential forces as the city struggled to gain the means to rectify the situation.

Wednesday 14 August: Te Upoko o te Ika, 1840s: A Struggle over Power, Mana and Resources by Hēni Collins Presented by the researcher, writer and journalist, Hēni Collins, this illustrated talk will cover a period of history in Te Whanganui a Tara/ Wellington Harbour and the Kapiti Coast during the mid-19th century. It was a time when the mana of Te Rauparaha, Te Rangihaeata and allied tribes was undercut by English settler ambition and then eventually backed up by the heavy hand of the British military. This represented a huge shift in access to land, economic resources, power and cultural dominance in the region. Ka mate ka ora! The siprit of Te Rauparaha / Hēni CollinsHēni Collins is the author of Ka mate ka ora! : the spirit of Te Rauparaha (Steele Roberts, 2010). The story of Te Rauparaha and his times continues to intrigue, provoke and inspire Maori and Pakeha alike. In this book Collins describes Te Rauparaha’s life from the time his birth was foretold, through inter-tribal conflict, migration, settlement in the south (Kapiti Island), and into the period of colonization. Signed copies of the book will be available for sale at the conclusion of this talk

Wednesday 21 August: Radical Wellington: Philip Josephs, the Freedom Group & the Great Strike of 1913 by Jared Davidson Jared Davidson, archivist and author of Sewing Freedom, will be talking about the colourful radicals of the early labour movement in Wellington – anarchists and the Industrial Workers of the World. As well as organising one of New Zealand’s first anarchist collectives, Josephs and members of the IWW were active in Wellington’s working-class counter culture and the Great Strike of 1913. This talks aims to highlight the role of literature, meetings and international influences in these events. Signed copies of Jared Davidson’s book Sewing Freedom will be available for sale for $15 at the conclusion of the talk (sorry; no eftpos) Whatu kākahu = Māori cloaks / edited by Awhina Tamarapa.

Wednesday 28 August: He tohu aroha – the protective role of Māori cloaks by Awhina Tamarapa Awhina Tamarapa edited and contributed to the book Whatu Kakahu which arose from the outstanding exhibition at Te Papa,  Kahu ora : living cloaks (June-Otober, 2012). Of special interest to Wellingtonians will be the history of the cloak of Ruhia Porutu, deposited into the care of Te Papa by the whānau of Henry Pitt.  This is the beautiful kākahu that saved the life of Thomas Wilmore McKenzie in 1840 who had arrived in Wellington as a teenager on board one of the first settler ships. McKenzie went on to become a prominent Wellington citizen but never forgot the debt he owed to Ruhia Porutu and the two families maintained a life-long friendship. Awhina Tamarapa (Ngati Kahungunu, Ngati Ruanui, Ngati Pikiao) is a curator of Maori artifacts at Te Papa.  She holds a Bachelor of Maori Laws and Philosophy from Te Wananga o Raukawa, Otaki, and a Bachelor of Arts from Victoria University, Wellington, where she majored in Anthropology.

History For Lunch

Law for Lunch at Ruth Gotlieb – Kilbirnie Library – Benefit Reforms: What everybody needs to know

Welcome to the seminar of Law for Lunch at the Kilbirnie Branch Library!
Our speaker this week will be Kahureremoa Aki, Community Lawyer at the Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley.
Law for Lunch logo

Kahureremoa Aki is the Rōia Hāpori (Community Lawyer) providing legal services to Māori at Community Law Wellington and Hutt Valley. She has helped many families with questions about social security.
Kahu will be focussing on:

• Youth and young parents
• Budgeting and incentives
• Being “work available”
• The DPB and children
• Social obligations
• Drug testing
• Penalties and exemptions

Come along to find out more about the Welfare Reforms and the changes, scheduled to come into effect this July.
Ask your questions about social obligations, dependent children and health issues, beneficiaries who refuse to apply for drug-tested jobs or any concerns you might have related to benefit reforms.

This presentation will take place this Wednesday, from 12 noon to 1pm, at the Ruth Gotlieb Kilbirnie Library.
All welcome!

For more information, please check our online event calendar