The Big Kids’ eBook Read

New Zealand has a fine tradition of children’s literature, with many wonderful authors to sample and enjoy. Did you know many are also available to borrow through our eLibrary?

In December (from the 3rd to the 9th), we’ve joined with Penguin Random House New Zealand and celebrated Wellington author Kate De Goldi to provide unlimited eBook loans of her children’s fiction title, From the cutting room of Barney Kettle!

Reading Resources:

Kate has written a heartfelt author’s letter on the novel’s origins and strong sense of place (it’s set in Christchurch):

Author’s Letter – Big Kids’ eBook Read

For teachers and school librarians, Kate has provided a teacher resource to help prompt student ideas:

Teacher Resource – Barney Kettle

To start reading during this period:

On a smart phone or tablet — download the Libby app to your smart phone or mobile device, add Wellington City Libraries as your library, and log in with your library card number and surname to set up your account. Search for ‘From the cutting room of Barney Kettle’ to borrow your copy and start reading.

Users of computers and eReaders, including the Kobo range of  eReaders — you’re not left out! Find out more about borrowing our eBooks on our Getting Started with our eLibrary page.

From the cutting room of Barney Kettle won the Esther Glenn Award for Junior Fiction in 2016.  Here’s what the judges for the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults, had to say that year:

Surprising, gripping, heart-breaking and ultimately incredibly moving, this novel stood out right from the start. This book is packed with warmth, wonderful language, rich and witty observations, compelling characters and layers of message and meaning.

And here’s an intriguing, mysterious summary, from the Penguin New Zealand website to peak curiosity:

Meet filmmaker Barney Kettle, who liked to invent stories but found a real one under his nose.

Barney Kettle knew he would be a very famous film director one day, he just didn’t know when that day would arrive. He was already an actual director – he’d made four fifteen-minute films – but so far only his schoolmates and the residents of the High Street had viewed them. Global fame was a little way off. It would come, though. Barney was certain about that …

So begins the manuscript written from the hospital bed of an unnamed man.

[…] He has written so he can remember the inimitable Barney Kettle, filmmaker, part-time dictator, questing brain, theatrical friend; a boy who loved to invent stories but found a real one under his nose; a boy who explored his neighbourhood with camera in hand and stumbled on a mystery that changed everything …

— Penguin New Zealand

For a taste of this award-winning title’s brilliant start, click on the eBook sample below:

Join us as we read this brilliant eBook title together across Wellington in December — at school, at home or in the library, we’ll all be reading together!

Huge thanks to Penguin Random House New Zealand and Kate De Goldi, for your support of this exciting opportunity for Wellingtonians!

Visions of the Past: New eBook Fiction

The Winter Witch book cover

From the construction of the Sydney Opera House to the Tiananmen Square protests to the forgotten language of childhood, this month’s new eBook fiction from Overdrive will help you see the past through fresh eyes. Included are the Booker-longlisted Everything Under by Daisy Johnson and National Book Award finalist The Friend by Sigrid Nunez. Nunez’s work has been described as “a beautiful book crammed with a world of insight into death, grief, art and love.” Enjoy!

Overdrive cover The Friend, by Sigrid Nunez
“When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind. Her own battle against grief is intensified by the mute suffering of the dog, a huge Great Dane. But while troubles abound, rich and surprising rewards lie in store for both of them.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Everything Under, by Daisy Johnson
“Words are important to Gretel. As a child she lived on a canal boat with her mother, and together they invented a language that was just their own. She hasn’t seen her mother since the age of sixteen though, and those memories have faded. Now Gretel works as a lexicographer, updating dictionary entries, which suits her solitary nature. But then a phone call interrupts Gretel’s isolation and throws up questions from long ago.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Map and the Territory, by Michel Houellebecq
“Artist Jed Martin emerges from a ten-year hiatus with good news. It has nothing to do with his broken boiler, the approach of another lamentably awkward Christmas dinner with his father or the memory of his doomed love affair with the beautiful Olga. It is that, for his new exhibition, he has secured the involvement of none other than celebrated novelist Michel Houellebecq!” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Once We Were Brothers–A Novel, by Ronald H. Balson
“Elliot Rosenzweig, a respected civic leader and wealthy philanthropist, is attending a fundraiser when he is suddenly accused of being a former Nazi SS officer. Although the charges are denounced as preposterous, his accuser is convinced he is right and engages attorney Catherine Lockhart to bring Rosenzweig to justice. Two lives, two worlds, and sixty years converge in an explosive race to redemption.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Winter Witch, by Paula Brackston
“In her small Welsh town, there is no one quite like Morgana. She is small and quick and pretty enough to attract a suitor, but there are things that set her apart from other girls. Though her mind is sharp she has not spoken since she was a young girl. Her silence is a mystery, as well as her magic—the household objects that seem to move at her command, the bad luck that visits those who do her ill. But Morgana must learn to harness her power, or she will lose everything.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Shell, by Kristina Olsson
“In 1965 as Danish architect Jørn Utzon’s striking vision for the Sydney Opera House unleashes a storm of controversy, the shadow of the Vietnam War threatens to tear the country apart. Journalist Pearl Keogh, exiled to the women’s pages after being photographed at an anti-war protest, is desperate to find her two missing brothers. Axel Lindquist, a visionary young glass artist, is obsessed with creating a work that will do justice to Utzon’s towering masterpiece.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Mars Room, by Rachel Kushner
“Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility. Outside is the world from which she has been permanently severed: the San Francisco of her youth, changed almost beyond recognition. Inside is a new reality to adapt to: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials. Romy sees the future stretch out ahead of her in a long, unwavering line – until news from outside brings a ferocious urgency to her existence.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Red Doc>, by Anne Carson
“In a stunningly original mix of poetry, drama, and narrative, Anne Carson brings the red-winged Geryon from Autobiography of Red into manhood. We join him as he travels with his friend and lover ‘Sad’ (short for Sad But Great), a war veteran, and Ida, an artist. Haunted by Proust, juxtaposing the hunger for flight with the longing for family and home, this deeply powerful picaresque verse invites readers on an extraordinary journey of the soul.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Beijing Coma, by Ma Jian
“Dai Wei lies in his bedroom, a prisoner in his body, after he was shot in the head at the Tiananmen Square protest ten years earlier. As his mother tends to him, and his friends bring news of their lives in an almost unrecognisable China, Dai Wei escapes into his memories. As the minute-by-minute chronicling of the lead-up to his shooting becomes ever more intense, the reader is caught in a gripping emotional journey.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Where Shall We Run To? New eAudiobook Non-Fiction

The Library of Ice eBook cover

Cartoonist Carl Barks has been called one of the great storytellers of the 20th century, yet despite the exotic worlds of his stories, he didn’t leave North America until he was 93 years old! Instead Barks drew inspiration from books, encyclopedias and his subscription to National Geographic. This month’s new eAudiobook non-fiction from Overdrive has a similar spirit, taking listeners from the winter darkness of Greenland, across the Silk Road to China and even down to the US-Mexico border. So grab your computer, phone or tablet and join us as we venture into worlds unknown!

Overdrive cover The Line Becomes a River, by Francisco Cantú
“Francisco Cantú was a US Border Patrol agent from 2008 to 2012. He worked the desert along the Mexican border, at the remote crossroads of drug routes and smuggling corridors, tracking humans through blistering days and frigid nights across a vast terrain. He detains the exhausted and the parched. He hauls in the dead. He tries not to think where the stories go from there…” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover My Life, My Fight, by Steven Adams
“The OKC Thunder’s big man shares the unlikely story behind his indomitable sense of determination and his journey from Rotorua, New Zealand to stardom in the NBA. Told with warmth, humour and humility, My Life, My Fight is a gripping account from an emerging superstar.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Lands of Lost Borders, by Kate Harris
Lands of Lost Borders is the chronicle of Harris’s odyssey and an exploration of the importance of breaking the boundaries we set ourselves; an examination of the stories borders tell, and the restrictions they place on nature and humanity; and a meditation on the existential need to explore—the essential longing to discover what in the universe we are doing here.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover I Can’t Date Jesus, by Michael Arceneaux
“In the style of New York Times bestsellers You Can’t Touch My Hair, Bad Feminist and I’m Judging You, a timely collection of alternately hysterical and soul‑searching essays about what it is like to grow up as a creative, sensitive black man in a world that constantly tries to deride and diminish your humanity.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Where Shall We Run To?, by Alan Garner
“In Where Shall We Run To?, Alan Garner remembers his early childhood in the Cheshire village of Alderley Edge: life at the village school as ‘a sissy and a mardy-arse’; pushing his friend Harold into a clump of nettles to test the truth of dock leaves; his father joining the army to guard the family against Hitler. From one of our greatest living writers, it is a remarkable and evocative memoir of a vanished England.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Library of Ice, by Nancy Campbell
“Author Nancy Campbell leads the reader carefully across intertwined icy tracks of crystallised geographics, melting myths and frozen exploration histories as well as her own tender diagnostics of what reading ice can show us in these times. Perilous in its scope, exacting in its observation, wild in intellect, The Library of Ice captures the reader’s attention almost as if caught in ice itself.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover No One Tells You This, by Glynnis MacNicol
“If the story doesn’t end with marriage or a child, what then? This question plagued Glynnis MacNicol on the eve of her 40th birthday. Despite a successful career as a writer, and an exciting life in New York City, Glynnis was constantly reminded she had neither of the things the world expected of a woman her age: a partner or a baby. There was no good blueprint for how to be a woman alone in the world. She concluded it was time to create one.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Vietnam, An Epic Tragedy, by Max Hastings
“Vietnam became the Western world’s most divisive modern conflict, precipitating a battlefield humiliation for France in 1954, then a vastly greater one for the United States in 1975. Max Hastings has spent the past three years interviewing scores of participants on both sides, as well as researching a multitude of American and Vietnamese documents and memoirs, to create a political and military narrative of the entire conflict.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Leftover in China, by Roseann Lake
“Roseann Lake’s Leftover in China employs colourful anecdotes, hundreds of interviews and rigorous historical and demographic research to show how the ‘leftovers’ are the ultimate linchpin to China’s future.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Fire and Fury, by Michael Wolff
“The first nine months of Donald Trump’s term were stormy, outrageous—and absolutely mesmerising. Now, thanks to his deep access to the West Wing, bestselling author Michael Wolff tells the riveting story of how Trump launched a tenure as volatile and fiery as the man himself. In this explosive audiobook, Wolff provides a wealth of new details about the chaos in the Oval Office, showing us how and why Donald Trump has become the king of discord and disunion.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

We have tablets available to borrow at most libraries

Customer tablet with booksSince earlier this year, adult customers have been able to borrow   iPad minis for 3 weeks from the Second Floor desk at the Central Library. They are now also available at the following libraries: Miramar, Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie), Newtown, Island Bay, Mervyn Kemp (Tawa), Johnsonville, Karori and Cummings Park (Ngaio)!

These tablets are perfect if you would like to become more familiar with the library’s eResources such as free eBooks (Overdrive), newspapers (PressReader), magazines (RBdigital), and other online resources. Loans are $5, and community card discounts apply.  Tablets are reset between each customer and renewals are not possible.

Please make a booking if you would like an introduction to the library’s eResources, and a staff member will contact you to confirm your tablet pickup time. Alternatively, ask one of our staff at the libraries above about borrowing a tablet, and if one is available you will be able to borrow it immediately.

Murder, maths and pashing with new eAudiobook fiction

Memento Park book cover

The titles in this month’s blog introduce new perspectives to the Overdrive collection: there’s a colour-dominated world in The Colour of Bee Larkham’s Murder, a universe of numbers in The Kiss Quotient and, in Lilith Saintcrow’s Afterwar, American politics are seen through the aftermath of a second civil war. So get started here, or visit Overdrive to check out what else is on offer!

Overdrive cover The Kiss Quotient, by Helen Hoang
“Stella Lane comes up with algorithms to predict customer purchases—a job that has given her more money than she knows what to do with as well as way less experience in the dating department than the average thirty-year-old. It doesn’t help that she has Asperger’s. She decides that she needs practice—which is why she hires escort Michael Phan…” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Colour of Bee Larkham’s Murder, by Sarah J. Harris
“There are three things you need to know about Jasper. 1. He sees the world completely differently. 2. He can’t recognise faces – not even his own. 3. He is the only witness to the murder of his neighbour, Bee Larkham. But it’s hard to catch a murderer when you can’t recognise their face…” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Summer I Met Jack, by Michelle Gable
“In this scintillating audiobook, listeners are asked to imagine the affair between John F. Kennedy and Alicia Corning Clark – and the child they may have had. The Summer I Met Jack is based on the fascinating real life of Alicia Corning Clark, a woman who J. Edgar Hoover insisted was paid by the Kennedys to keep quiet, not only about her romance with Jack Kennedy, but also a baby they may have had together.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco
The Name of the Rose is a thrilling story enriched with period detail and laced with tongue-in-cheek allusions to fictional characters, the most striking of which is the Franciscan friar William of Baskerville. Brother William tries to discover why people are dying inexplicably and nastily in the monastery. There is something not altogether right within the library…” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Afterwar, by Lilith Saintcrow
“America has been devastated by a second civil war. The people have spent years divided, fighting their fellow patriots. Now, as the regime crumbles and the bloody conflict draws to a close, the work of rebuilding begins. One lonely crew, bonded under fire in the darkest days of battle, must complete one last mission: to secure a war criminal whose secrets could destroy the fragile peace that has just begun to form.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Dangers of Family Secrets, by Debby Holt
“Freya is a genealogist, but has never paid as much attention to her own family. When her marriage starts to collapse and her grown-up daughters seem more distant than ever, Freya’s reckless abandon startles everyone, and long-hidden secrets begin to emerge…” (Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Bearskin, by James A. McLaughlin
“Rice Moore is just beginning to think his troubles are behind him. He’s found a job protecting a remote forest preserve in Virginian Appalachia—perfect to hide away from the Mexican drug cartels he betrayed back in Arizona. But when Rice finds the carcass of a bear killed on the grounds, the quiet solitude he’s so desperately sought is suddenly at risk.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Devil’s Highway, by Gregory Norminton
“An ancient British boy, discovering a terrorist plot, must choose between his brother and his tribe. In the twenty-first century, two men – one damaged by war, another by divorce – clash over their differing claims on the land, and a young girl is caught between them. In the distant future, a gang of feral children struggles to reach safety in a burning world. Three journeys. Three thousand years.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Memento Park, by Mark Sarvas
“After receiving an unexpected call from the Australian consulate, Matt Santos becomes aware of a painting that he believes was looted from his family in Hungary during the Second World War. To recover the painting, he must repair his relationship with his harshly judgmental father, uncover his family history and restore his connection to his own Judaism.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

A taste of life: New eBook fiction

I Married A Communist book cover

With the recent death of Philip Roth, the world lost a writer of unique skill and intensity. His writing process has been compared to the work of a doctor in an emergency room (as well as a prisoner in a torture chamber), however he kept writing until his 77th birthday, with his final novel published in 2010. To celebrate Roth’s achievements, Overdrive has released some of his greatest works as eBooks, including the Pulitzer-winning American Pastoral. There are also novels from authors including Dagger-nominated Luke McCallin and our own Tessa Duder! Log in to find out more!

Overdrive cover American Pastoral, by Philip Roth
“‘Swede’ Levov is living the American dream. He glides through life sustained by his devoted family, his demanding yet highly rewarding (and lucrative) business, his sporting prowess, his good looks. He is the embodiment of thriving, post-war America, land of liberty and hope. Until the sunny day in 1968, when the Swede’s bountiful American luck deserts him.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover I Married a Communist, by Philip Roth
“The second novel of Roth’s American trilogy charts the rise and fall of Ira Ringold, an American roughneck who begins life as a ditchdigger in 1930s New Jersey, becoming a big-time radio hotshot. In his heyday Ira marries Hollywood’s beloved leading lady, Eve Frame. Their glamorous honeymoon is short-lived, however, and it is the publication of Eve’s scandalous bestselling expose that identifies Ira as ‘an American taking his orders from Moscow’.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Hotel Silence, by Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir
“Jonas feels like his life is over. His wife has left him, his mother is slipping deeper into dementia and his daughter is no longer who he thought. So he comes up with a fool-proof plan: to buy a one-way ticket to a chaotic, war-ravaged country and put an end to it all. But on arriving at Hotel Silence, he finds his plans – and his anonymity – begin to dissolve under the foreign sun.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover An American Marriage, by Tayari Jones
“Newlyweds, Celestial and Roy, are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. They are settling into the routine of their life together, when they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover A Head Full of Ghosts, by Paul Tremblay
“The lives of the Barretts are torn apart when fourteen-year-old Marjorie begins to display signs of acute schizophrenia. To her parents’ despair, the doctors are unable to halt Marjorie’s descent into madness. As their stable home devolves into a house of horrors, they reluctantly turn to a local Catholic priest for help, and soon find themselves the unwitting stars of The Possession, a hit TV show.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Boy Who Belonged to the Sea, by Denis Thériault
“Set on the rugged north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, The Boy Who Belonged to the Sea tells the touching story of an extraordinary friendship between two young boys who have both suffered the loss of a parent. Although they have little else in common, the boys come together in their grief and take refuge in a world of their own creation.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Is She Still Alive?, by Tessa Duder
“In 2003 Tessa Duder spent six months in Europe as the recipient of the Katherine Mansfield Memorial Fellowship. Internationally renowned for her superb children’s and YA novels, Tessa used her time in Menton to write something very different: a superb collection of thirteen stories for women who have moved beyond youth and into maturity.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Burning Fields, by Alli Sinclair
“Desperate to leave his turbulent history behind, Tomas Conti has left Italy to join his family in Piri River. Tomas struggles to adapt in Australia–until he meets Rosie. Her easy–going nature and positive outlook help him forget the life he’s escaped. But as their relationship grows, so do tensions between the two families, until the situation becomes explosive.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Silmarillion, by J. R. R. Tolkien
The Silmarillion is an account of the Elder Days, of the First Age of Tolkien’s world. It is the ancient drama to which the characters in The Lord of the Rings look back, and in whose events some of them such as Elrond and Galadriel took part. The tales of The Silmarillion are set in an age when Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, dwelt in Middle-Earth, and the High Elves made war upon him for the recovery of the Silmarils, the jewels containing the pure light of Valinor.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Ashes of Berlin, by Luke McCallin
“1947 and Gregor Reinhardt has been hired back onto Berlin’s civilian police force. When a man is found slain in a broken-down tenement, Reinhardt embarks on a gruesome investigation. It seems a serial killer is on the loose, and matters can only escalate…” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Pan Macmillan titles are moving to OverDrive

From the 28th of June, you’ll be able to issue hundreds of new Pan Macmillan titles through our OverDrive eBook service. eBook titles by authors like David Baldacci, Sue Grafton, Ann Cleeves and Andy Griffiths will be available for the first time on OverDrive.

Borrow eBooks

In the past, we’ve hosted Pan Macmillan eBooks through our other supplier of eBooks, BorrowBox. In response to customer demand though, and in an effort to consolidate our eBook collections, we’ve transferred this content across to OverDrive.

From the 26th of June, Pan Macmillan eBooks will no longer be available through BorrowBox.

There’s plenty of amazing and exclusive eAudio content on BorrowBox, so we still encourage you to check in with BorrowBox for new audiobook titles by authors like Lee Child, James Patterson, Eleanor Catton and Andy Griffiths. We’ll also host a smaller collection of eBooks on BorrowBox into the future.

If you’d like to get started with either our OverDrive or BorrowBox eBook and eAudio collections, go to our eLibrary Help page.

For more information or direct help with this change, please leave us a message with our Technical Support form.

Melbourne’s master storyteller: New eAudiobook non-fiction

This House of Grief

In the mid-1970s, while living in a sweltering share-house in Melbourne, Helen Garner would escape to the State Library of Victoria and write what would eventually become Monkey Grip, one of Australia’s defining novels. Over thirty years later the celebrated author has released another classic: the non-fiction This House of Grief. This House of Grief has been described as containing “trademark Helen Garner touches: harrowing scenes recorded without restraint or censorship; touching observations of characters’ weaknesses; wry moments of humour.” So log in to Overdrive to discover—or re-discover—this master storyteller yourself!

Overdrive cover This House of Grief, by Helen Garner
“On the evening of 4 September 2005, Robert Farquharson, a separated husband, was driving his three sons home to their mother when his car plunged into a dam. The boys, aged ten, seven and two, drowned. Was this an act of revenge or a tragic accident? In this utterly compelling book, Helen Garner tells the story of a man and his broken life. She presents the theatre of the courtroom with its actors and audience, players in the extraordinary drama of the quest for justice.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Tomorrow Will Be Different, by Sarah McBride
“Informative, heart-breaking and profoundly empowering, Tomorrow Will Be Different is Sarah McBride’s story of love and loss and a powerful entry point into the LGBTQ community’s battle for equal rights and what it means to be openly transgender. From issues like bathroom access to health care to gender in America, McBride weaves the important political and cultural milestones into a personal journey that will open hearts and change minds.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Invisible Ink, by Brian McDonald
“Acclaimed by successful screenwriters and authors, Invisible Ink is a helpful, accessible guide to the essential elements of the best storytelling. Brian McDonald, an award-winning screenwriter who has taught his craft at several major studios, supplies writers with tools to make their work more effective and provides readers and audiences with a deeper understanding of the storyteller’s art.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover I Contain Multitudes, by Ed Yong
“Your body is teeming with tens of trillions of microbes. It’s an entire world, a colony full of life. These microscopic companions sculpt our organs, protect us from diseases, guide our behaviour and bombard us with their genes. They also hold the key to understanding all life on earth. In I Contain Multitudes, Ed Yong invites us to marvel at ourselves and other animals in a new light, less as individuals and more as thriving ecosystems.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The ISIS Apocalypse, by William McCants
“The Islamic State is one of the most successful jihadist groups in modern history. Thousands of its followers have marched across Syria and Iraq, subjugating millions and daring anyone to stop them. Based almost entirely on primary sources—including secret al-Qaeda and Islamic State letters—William McCants’ The ISIS Apocalypse explores how religious fervour, strategic calculation and doomsday prophecy shaped the Islamic State’s past and foreshadow its dark future.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Feminist Fight Club, by Jessica Bennett
“Are you aged zero to infinity? Finished with the sexist status quo? Welcome to the Feminist Fight Club. You have lifetime membership. Feminist Fight Club provides an arsenal of weapons for surviving in an unequal world. You will learn how to fight micro-aggressions, correct unconscious bias, deal with male colleagues who can’t stop ‘manterrupting’ or ‘bro-propriating’ your ideas – and how to lean in without falling the f*ck over.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, by Jason Schreier
“Developing video games—hero’s journey or fool’s errand? The creative and technical logistics that go into building today’s hottest games can be more harrowing and complex than the games themselves, often seeming like an endless maze or a bottomless abyss. In Blood, Sweat, and Pixels, Jason Schreier takes listeners on a fascinating odyssey behind the scenes of video game development.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Flat Broke with Two Goats, by Jennifer McGaha
“Told with bold wit, unflinching honesty and a firm foot in the traditions of Appalachia, Flat Broke with Two Goats blends stories of homesteading with the journey of two people rediscovering the true meaning of home.” (Overdrive description.)

Emu or eBook? New Australian fiction

Some great and memorable things have come out of Australia: Thylacoleo carnifex, the giant marsupial lion; not one but three national Frisbee teams; the world’s oldest fossil (at 3.4 billion years old!). And this month Overdrive is adding to the list with fantastic new Australian fiction, including work from emerging authors such as Jay Carmichael and Robbie Arnott. So once you’re done wondering about the platypus (how does a mammal lay an egg?!) sign up to Overdrive and have a read!

Overdrive cover Peripheral Vision, by Paddy O’Reilly
“A teenager on the tram meets an old man claiming to be Jesus Christ. Six young women band together on a night prowl. A Filipino immigrant clashes with his eldest sister, who has brought him to Australia for a better life. And in a future where dogs have risen up against their owners, a mother is alarmed by her adolescent daughter’s behavior. Through such diverse characters, Paddy O’Reilly takes us into the fringes of human nature.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Ironbark, by Jay Carmichael
“Markus Bello’s life has stalled. Living in a small country town, mourning the death of his best friend, Grayson, Markus is isolated and adrift. As time passes, and life continues around him, Markus must try to face his grief, and come to terms with what is left. Through his protagonist, Markus, author Jay Carmichael depicts the conflict and confusion of life as a gay man in rural Australia.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Flames, by Robbie Arnott
“A young man named Levi McAllister decides to build a coffin for his twenty-three-year-old sister, Charlotte—who promptly runs for her life. A water rat swims upriver in quest of the cloud god. A fisherman named Karl hunts for tuna in partnership with a seal. And a father takes form from fire. The answers to these riddles are to be found in this tale of grief and love and the bonds of family, tracing a journey across the southern island that takes us full circle.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Chemistry, by Weike Wang
“Our unnamed narrator is three years into her post-grad studies in chemistry and nearly as long into her relationship with her devoted boyfriend, who has just proposed. But while his path forward seems straight, hers is ‘like a gas particle moving around in space’. Eventually, the pressure mounts so high that she must leave everything she thought she knew about her future, and herself, behind.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Buddha in the Attic, by Julie Otsuka
“Between the first and second world wars a group of young, non-English-speaking Japanese women travelled by boat to America. They were picture brides, clutching photos of husbands-to-be whom they had yet to meet. Julie Otsuka tells their extraordinary, heartbreaking story in this spellbinding and poetic account of strangers lost and alone in a new and deeply foreign land.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Street Sweeper, by Elliot Perlman
“Recently released from prison, Lamont Williams, an African American probationary janitor, strikes up an unlikely friendship with an elderly patient. A few kilometres uptown, Australian historian Adam Zignelik, an untenured Columbia professor, finds both his career and his long-term romantic relationship falling apart. As these two men try to survive in early twenty-first-century New York, history comes to life in ways neither of them could have foreseen.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Homesick For Another World, by Ottessa Moshfegh
“There’s something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh’s stories, something almost dangerous while also being delightful – and often even weirdly hilarious. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet; all yearning for connection and betterment, in very different ways, but each of them seems destined to be tripped up by their own baser impulses.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Book of Colours, by Robyn Cadwallader
“London, 1321: in a small shop in Paternoster Row, three people are drawn together around the creation of a magnificent book, an illuminated manuscript of prayers, a book of hours. Even though the commission seems to answer the aspirations of each one of them, their own desires and ambitions threaten its completion. As each struggles to see the book come into being, it will change everything they have understood about their place in the world.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Turning for Home, by Barney Norris
“Every year, Robert’s family come together at a rambling old house to celebrate his birthday – it has been a milestone in their lives for decades. But this year Robert doesn’t want to be reminded of what has happened since they last met – and neither, for quite different reasons, does his granddaughter Kate. But for both Robert and Kate, it may become the most important gathering of all.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Stitching up the universe: New eAudiobook fiction

The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us. – Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

But is that true? And if so, what’s been stitched together in this month’s new eAudiobook fiction from Overdrive? As well as Bradbury’s 1953 classic, there’s a patchwork of other great titles, from Zadie Smith’s White Teeth to Ian McEwan’s The Innocent. Political tensions emerge in Alex Berenson’s The Deceivers and to top it off, there’s the novel that spawned the latest Netflix hit: Altered Carbon!

Overdrive cover Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
“Ray Bradbury’s internationally acclaimed novel Fahrenheit 451 is a masterwork of 20th-century literature set in a bleak, dystopian future, narrated here by Academy Award-winning actor Tim Robbins. Guy Montag is a fireman. In his world, where television rules and literature is on the brink of extinction, firemen start fires rather than put them out. His job is to destroy the most illegal of commodities: the printed book.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover White Teeth, by Zadie Smith
“Zadie Smith’s dazzling debut caught critics grasping for comparisons, but the truth is that Zadie Smith’s voice is remarkably, fluently, and altogether wonderfully her own. Set against London’s racial and cultural tapestry, venturing across the former empire and into the past as it barrels toward the future, White Teeth revels in the ecstatic hodgepodge of modern life, flirting with disaster, confounding expectations, and embracing the comedy of daily existence.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Bachelor Girl, by Kim van Alkemade
“From the New York Times bestselling author of Orphan #8 comes a fresh and intimate novel in the vein of Lilac Girls and The Alice Network about the destructive power of secrets and the redemptive power of love—inspired by the true story of Jacob Ruppert, the millionaire owner of the New York Yankees, and his mysterious bequest in 1939 to an unknown actress, Helen Winthrope Weyant.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Code of Conduct, by Brad Thor
“Hidden deep within one of the world’s most powerful organizations is a secret committee with a devastating agenda. Its members are afforded incredible protections—considered elites, untouchables. But when four seconds of video is captured halfway around the world and anonymously transmitted to D.C., covert wheels are set in motion, and counter-terrorism operative Scot Harvath is tapped to undertake the deadliest assignment of his career.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover This Could Hurt, by Jillian Medoff
“Jillian Medoff explores the inner workings of an American company in all its brilliant, insane, comforting and terrifying glory. Authentic, razor-sharp and achingly funny, This Could Hurt is a novel about work, loneliness, love and loyalty; about sudden reversals and unexpected windfalls; a novel about life.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Innocent, by Ian McEwan
“The setting is Berlin. Into this divided city, wrenched between East and West, between past and present; comes twenty-five-year-old Leonard Marnham, assigned to a British-American surveillance team. Though only a pawn in an international plot that is never fully revealed to him, Leonard uses his secret work to escape the bonds of his ordinary life – and to lose his unwanted innocence.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Every Note Played, by Lisa Genova
“An accomplished concert pianist, Richard received standing ovations from audiences all over the world. But that was eight months ago. Richard now has ALS. As his muscles, voice and breath fade, he and his ex-wife Karina try to reconcile their past before it’s too late. Poignant and powerful, Every Note Played is a masterful exploration of redemption and what it means to find peace inside of forgiveness.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Deceivers, by Alex Berenson
“It was supposed to be a terrorist sting. The guns were supposed to be disabled. Then why was there so much blood? The target was the American Airlines Center, the home of the Dallas Mavericks. The FBI had told Ahmed Shakir that his drug bust would go away if he helped them, and they’d supply all the weaponry, carefully removing the firing pins before the main event. It never occurred to Ahmed to doubt them, until it was too late.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Altered Carbon, by Richard K. Morgan
“In the twenty-fifth century, humankind has spread throughout the galaxy, monitored by the watchful eye of the U.N. While divisions in race, religion, and class still exist, advances in technology have redefined life itself. Now, assuming one can afford the expensive procedure, a person’s consciousness can be stored in a cortical stack at the base of the brain and easily downloaded into a new body (or ‘sleeve’) making death nothing more than a minor blip on a screen.” (Overdrive description.)