We have tablets available to borrow at most libraries

Customer tablet with booksSince earlier this year, adult customers have been able to borrow   iPad minis for 3 weeks from the Second Floor desk at the Central Library. They are now also available at the following branch libraries: Miramar, Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie), Newtown, Island Bay, Mervyn Kemp (Tawa), Johnsonville and Cummings Park (Ngaio)!

These tablets are perfect if you would like to become more familiar with the library’s eResources such as free eBooks (Overdrive), newspapers (PressReader), magazines (RBdigital), and other online resources. Loans are $5, and community card discounts apply.  Tablets are reset between each customer.

Please make a booking if you would like an introduction to the library’s eResources, and a staff member will contact you to confirm your tablet pickup time. Alternatively, ask one of our staff at the libraries above for more information on the service, they’ll be happy to tell you more.

Did you know we have Britannica Online?

Encyclopaedia Britannica is amazing! You get access to three sites in one: Children, Young Adults, and the Reference Center for older students and adults. This means you get to choose the level that best meets your needs, whether you are conducting research, completing homework for school or simply wanting to learn something new.

Within each of the three sites, you have access to tens of thousands of encyclopaedia entries, curated magazine articles, images, videos, audio clips, primary sources, maps, research tools, recommended websites and pop-up access to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary and Thesaurus. And Britannica Library works on any device—PC, laptop, tablet, or smartphone. Check out this video to get an overview of all the amazing features:

If you have any questions about Encyclopaedia Britannica, please let us know.

New RBdigital app now available

Have you tried the new RBdigital app? It is now available to download from your app store and is the new app for reading our Zinio (now-renamed RBdigital) magazine collection.  It has some great features – you’re able to search our magazine collection, checkout and download issues all in the one app.  That means there is no need to move out of the app to browse, or to reopen your app to download.  You can also add other accounts, so there can be more than one user in the app.

If you open your existing Zinio for Libraries app, you will be prompted to download the new app, or depending on your device, visit your app store from these links: iOS | Google Play. Alternatively, search for “RBdigital” in the app store, if you’re not reading this on your device. Within the next month, you’ll need to changeover to the new app, and Zinio for Libraries will stop providing access.  So download the new app and have a look round.  There is a basic, but comprehensive help feature inside the app to get you started, or click on the image below for a quick guide to getting started.

If you have any questions or encounter any problems please contact us via the technical support form.

RBdigital

Read “My Katherine Mansfield Project” on BWB Online

If you are interested in reading Katherine Mansfield’s books then don’t miss this eBook: Kirsty Gunn’s Thorndon Wellington and Home: My Katherine Mansfield Project. Read this eBook on Bridget Williams Books Text Collection, by entering your library card details.

Syndetics book coverThorndon : Wellington and home : my Katherine Mansfield project / Kirsty Gunn.
“For London-based writer Kirsty Gunn, returning to the city of her birth to spend a winter in a tiny colonial cottage in Thorndon is an exciting opportunity to walk the very streets and hills that Katherine Mansfield left behind on her departure from New Zealand, but later longed to revisit. For Mansfield, Gunn writes, home was an instant ‘go-to’ zone for invention and narrative and characterisation and setting. For Gunn, home is now two places – Here and there the same place after all.” (Syndetics summary)

Read more eBooks on New Zealand popular topics including the housing crisis, 1981 Springbok tour, and the Christchurch earthquake through Bridget Williams Books Text Collection.

 

 

What’s New with Oxford Art Online!

2017 brings a number of exciting changes to Oxford Arts Online (OAO) with more frequent updates, a number of expansive projects from leading experts, as well as improved search functions with a fresh look.

Offering access to the most authoritative and easily searchable online art resource available today, Oxford Art Online provides access to the complete Grove Art Online, the Benezit Dictionary of Artists, and other online reference publications from Oxford University Press.

Interested in contributing to the ongoing maintenance of Oxford University Press scholarship?  Grove Art has put out a call for new contributors to their editing team! So if you’re a Wellingtonian artist and interested in doing some editing and content revisions, find out more here.

With major research and publishing projects under way on topics such as the Latin American Art & Architecture collection, Censorship, Art Markets and Law as well as Medieval Art and Architecture  to name but a few. this is an exciting time for digital publications. Take a bit of browse and see what’s new!

Zinio for Libraries app changes coming soon

Zinio for Libraries is rebranding and becoming RBdigital – this means some changes ahead for us. On the 28th of June the RBdigital app will become the main app for our Zinio for Libraries magazine collection. The new RBdigital app has some great new features – now you’ll be able to search our magazine collection, check out and download issues all in the one app!  That means there will be no need to move out of the app to browse or reopen your app to download.

select to see in detail

You can download it from your usual app store and login with the same details as you use for Zinio for Libraries.  All of your Zinio for Libraries history will be retained, but you will have to re-download the magazines you have previously checked out and downloaded.   The Zinio for Libraries app will alert you by notification about the changes and you will be able to continue to use it for a minimum of 60 more days.  That will give you plenty of time to get set up in the new app! If you have any questions about this change, please let us know via the Technical Support form

On Tuesday June 27th there is a planned Zinio for Libraries outage to accommodate the switchover to RBdigital.  The outage will last for 14 hours, from 12pm on the 27th to 2am on Wednesday June 28th.  After that the new RBdigital should be up and running!

 

Drama Online & BWB Texts now available!

The library has purchased two new online tools for you to use through our website – Bloomsbury Drama Online and BWB Text Collection.  Both can be found on our Mygateway page (the home of our online resources) and can be accessed either at home or in the library.

Firstly, Drama Online is a one stop shop for anyone with an interest in drama.   This award winning database features over 1,200 classic and contemporary play texts, including the complete works of Shakespeare. Background to the plays are provided through critical scholarly works, theory and practical “how to” guides. There is also streaming video of live performances from Shakespeare’s Globe and professional audio recordings from L.A. Theatre Works. You can search for and sort plays and monologues using cast size, gender, roles, genre, period, author, setting and theme filters.

Feedback from the talented thespians on staff is that it should have real appeal to students, drama teachers and those involved in community theatre.  Dive straight in and have a play (haha) or check out this overview below.

The second online tool is from Bridget Williams, the BWB Text Collection.  Bridget Williams Books is a well-known local publisher of New Zealand print books and recently they have also developed an ebook platform. We previously purchased the BWB Treaty of Waitangi Collection and have now added the Texts Collection to our offerings.

The BWB Texts Collection brings together a diverse group of short ebooks on the big issues facing New Zealand by some of the country’s best writers and commentators. Topics covered include: the housing crisis, climate change, child poverty, inequality, the 1981 Springbox tour and public health.

One of the big positives for us all is that they are so easy to use – titles are meant to be read in the web browser, and this can be any web browser on any device.  There’s no downloading involved, just click on the title and read!   And the number of users are unlimited.

PressReader – the new improved PressDisplay

pressreader-appFrom September, the PressDisplay database will become PressReader. You will still get same day, unlimited access to full-page replicas of thousands of newspaper and magazine titles from NZ and around the world, but the look of PressReader is much more mobile friendly and customisable to view on your computer or mobile device. You can also choose to take advantage of a range of new features such as bookmarking, instant translation, keyword search and greatly improved social sharing.

Fantastic New Magazine Content

As well as the vast array of newspaper content, PressReader provides full access to as many magazines as newspapers with some great NZ titles, including NZ Listener, NZ Woman’s Day, Cuisine, Metro, NZ House & Garden, NZ Gardener, Little Treasures, NZ Rugby World, and Next. Overseas titles include Mojo, Q, BBC History, T3, Elle, Mollie Makes, Playstation Magazine, SFX, GQ Australia,Vogue Australia and Top Gear. And just like Pressdisplay, over 60 languages are represented in the newspaper & magazine content.

Accessing Pressreader

By using PressReader through the library website and by logging in with your library card, you now receive 48 hours of Pressreader access on that same computer without having to re-login again. A pop up at the beginning of each session will alert you to how much time you have remaining. When the time runs out, you can login again with your library card to get 48 more hours.

If you choose to, you can also use the free PressReader app both in the library and remotely to read newspapers and magazines. If you’re using the app in our libraries, you will immediately get 48 hours access to the content. If using it from home, login using your tablet or smartphone’s browser first via the library website to obtain this extended access, and then create your own unique signin to use the app (either using your email or a social media account), and create your own collection of titles and interests.  You can then use this sign in on the app. NB The ‘Library Card’ signin isn’t available to library members currently)

You may notice some slight differences between Pressdisplay and Pressreader – once you select a title, you can now ‘turn’ the pages by clicking and dragging the next page into the centre screen. Thumbnails of the pages that used to be on the right of the paper can now be found at the bottom of the screen, with the table of contents.

More information: Pressreader Help Centre, Pressreader videos, iOS user guide and for Android user guide.

If you have any questions about using the new Pressreader, please let us know at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

pressreader-carousel

Family History Month – Part 3

As Family History month continues so does the list of genealogy resources available at Wellington City Libraries. For this post we feature a handy hint from our Local History Specialist, Gábor, that you can use when using the historic ‘Birth, Death and Marriage’ database in order to get a specific date for the event you are searching for. Also some help in finding passenger lists for ships that came to New Zealand, World War 1 service records and the type of information you can find searching through the NZ Gazette. You can find a display of these genealogical resources from this series of blogs on the second floor of Wellington Central Library.

sailboat-459794_960_720

PASSENGER LISTS
When did your ancestors arrive in New Zealand? How did they get here? Where did they come from? Passenger lists can help you answer all these questions.
If you already know the name of the ship, or which port they might have arrived at in NZ, or roughly when, you can find many passenger lists on:

Denise and Peter’s
Over 1000 passenger lists, which can be searched by the name of the ship or port of arrival.

New Zealand Bound
Passenger lists arranged by port of arrival. Excellent tips on calculating year of arrival and other details, and many links to other sites containing passenger lists and all sorts of information related to shipping.

If you’re starting from scratch, without any immigration details, you can search by your ancestor’s name to find a passenger list on:
Family Search – Archives NZ Passenger Lists, 1839-1973
Search by the name of your ancestor, or browse the collection by port of arrival, year and ship. There are good tips for searching the lists.

Papers Past
Ships’ arrivals were usually reported in the newspapers, sometimes with a list of the passengers and often with interesting details about the sailing.

WORLD WAR 1 RECORDS ON ARCHWAY
If you had a relative serving in WW1 their military record will give a thorough description their military service – from when they enlisted, through wartime and beyond. Besides valuable information like birthdate and place, and next of kin, you can find out all sorts of interesting details about them, like the colour of their eyes and condition of their teeth!
Personnel files of WW1 servicemen are held at Archives NZ. The files are made up of numerous documents (attestation papers, medical history, casualty forms etc) that have been compiled into one file for each soldier. The files have been digitised and can be searched by name on ARCHWAY

PAPERS PAST
For adding depth and fascinating detail to your family history research, you can’t go past Papers Past.
This website of digitised newspapers from the National Library’s collection of NZ (including Maori) and Pacific newspapers is continuously being extended – both date ranges and titles. You can search for specific people, places, events etc, or browse through papers – what you find will provide insights into the social, economic and political times in which your ancestors lived.
The new version of the website was launched recently and has more than just newspapers. It is divided into 4 sections – Newspapers, Magazines and Journals, Letters and Diaries, and Parliamentary Papers. Searching is easier, with “a cleaner, more modern interface…and search tools have been improved, making it easier to search groups of papers, pick date ranges, and scan results”.

BIRTH, DEATH and MARRIAGE: Obtaining specific dates

After a change in legislation in the mid-2000’s, tighter restrictions on accessing birth, death and marriage (BDM) data were introduced which saw the end of the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) providing annual datasets. These had been published on microfiche up to 1990 (which the central library continues to hold) and as computer files from 1991 onwards. However this change also saw the DIA make “historic” BDM data available and searchable online providing the following conditions are met:

1. The birth occurred more than 100 years ago
2. The marriage occurred more than 80 years ago
3. The death occurred more than 50 years ago OR the deceased was (or would have been had they still been alive today) at least 80 years of age. For example, the registration of someone who passed away in 1995 aged 60 can now be searched for as they would have been over 80 today.

Searches on the BDM website normally produces a year and a reference number of an event which can be used to obtain a full print-out or certificate. However by manipulating the search parameters, you can force the database to produce the actual date (day, month and year) that the event took place. Start by running a search that produces a BDM result of the name of someone you are interested in. Then gradually start to narrow the time-frame being searched for in the “Search from date” and the “Search to date” options. Start by narrowing the year; if the name suddenly disappears you will know the event is outside of the date parameters you have set. When a year is isolated, start to narrow the range of months being searched, again making sure the name you seek continues to result from a search, then do the same for the day within the month. When the “search from” and “search to” dates are exactly the same and the name you are looking for still results when a search is run, you know that you have isolated the exact date of the birth, death or marriage. Try it at BDM – Historical Records online

The NZ GAZETTE

The New Zealand Gazette is a weekly publication of government proclamations and is a massive source of genealogical information. Published since the earliest days of the colony, the gazette holds information about land transfers, bankruptcy notices & business liquidations, military call-up lists, local council information and a huge wealth of other information. One of the most useful areas of the gazette for the family historian are the lists of names (and often addresses) of individuals applying for formal registration within certain occupations. Occupations which required registration include doctors, nurses, teachers, electricians, boilermakers, engine drivers, architects and any number of other roles including positions such as Justices of Peace. One of the issues with the NZ Gazette was that until recently it was very difficult to find any information about an individual without knowing the date a gazette “notice” was published. Today we have access to a searchable database containing all copies of the NZ Gazette from 1841 through to 2014. As the database is a commercial product, it is not available online but rather must be used on a computer set aside for family history purposes at the Central Library. Ask at the reference desk on the 2nd floor for details.

Exciting new additions and enhancements to Zinio

We have added some new titles to our WCL Zinio eMagazine collection and they are available now, free to read with your library card. Back issues for one year are also available for these new titles!

Adweek via ZinioAdweek
Android Magazine
Australian Knitting
BeanScene
Country Living
Cricket
Diabetic Living
DIVA
Faces
Film Comment
Gay Times
Country Living via ZinioGrazia UK edition
Harper’s Bazaar Arabia
HELLO! magazine
Marie Claire Fashion Shows
Men’s Health
N-Photo: the Nikon magazine
Red UK
Rolling Stone Australia
Teen Vogue
The Beer Connoisseur Magazine
The Week

When you are browsing Zinio you can locate any of these new titles by entering the name in the search box or choosing a genre. You can also find a full list of our Zinio titles here.

New features:

The following enhancements have also been added to the Zinio for Libraries apps. These should improve your Zinio experience even more!

• Direct links to check out new magazines from within the app (iOS & Android)
• Download preferences for automatically downloading checkouts or queuing up multiple magazines for batch downloading (iOS)
• Enhancements to storage management, including display of file size on devices (iOS)
• Instant reading available in an online reader for desktop & mobile

Plus, offline reading on iOS, Android and Kindle is now available! By logging in to the app using the same email and password used to check out magazines, magazines can be read offline (once downloaded).

If you haven’t explored Zinio yet – there’s more information about this collection on our MyGateway magazines page, together with advice on how to set yourself up on your desktop or mobile device. Enjoy!