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Keep ’em guessing – New eBook Fiction in March

Do you ever wonder about your neighbours? Sure, they look normal, but everyone’s got a secret or two. Several of this month’s new releases on Overdrive address this very question, including Marina Lewycka‘s latest novel, The Lubetkin Legacy. Add in great new crime fiction set in Belfast and Detroit, and you’ll have enough mystery to keep the whole street guessing!

Overdrive cover The Lubetkin Legacy, by Marina Lewycka
“North London in the twenty-first century: a place where a son will adopt an old lady to impersonate his departed mother, rather than lose the council flat. A time of golden job opportunities, though you might have to dress up as a coffee bean or work as an intern at an undertaker. A place rich in language – whether it’s Romanian, Russian or buxom housing officers talking managementese. Marina Lewycka is back in this hilarious, farcical, tender novel of modern issues and manners.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Telex from Cuba, by Rachel Kushner
“Fidel and Raúl Castro are in the hills, descending only to burn sugarcane plantations and recruit rebels. Rachel K. is in Havana’s Cabaret Tokio, entangled with a French agitator trying to escape his shameful past. Everly and K.C. are growing up in the dying days of a crumbling American colony, about to discover the cruelty and violence that have created their childhood idyll.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly, by Adrian McKinty
“Belfast 1988: a man has been shot in the back with an arrow. It ain’t Injuns and it isn’t Robin Hood. But uncovering exactly who has done it will take Detective Inspector Sean Duffy down his most dangerous road yet, a road that leads to a lonely clearing on the high bog where three masked gunmen will force Duffy to dig his own grave.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer
“Nine-year-old Oskar Schell is an inventor, amateur entomologist, Francophile, letter writer, pacifist, natural historian, percussionist, romantic, Great Explorer, jeweller, detective, vegan and collector of butterflies. When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he discovers in his father’s closet. It is a search that will lead him through New York, history and himself towards some kind of peace.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Flea Palace, by Elif Shafak
“Bonbon Palace was once a stately apartment block in Istanbul. Now it is a dilapidated home to ten wildly different individuals. There’s a womanising, hard-drinking academic with a penchant for philosophy; a ‘clean freak’ and her lice-ridden daughter; a lapsed Jew in search of true love; and a charmingly naïve mistress. When the garbage at Bonbon Palace is stolen, a mysterious sequence of events unfolds that result in a soul-searching quest for truth.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover My Sister’s Bones, by Nuala Ellwood
“Kate Rafter is a high-flying war reporter. She’s the strong one. The one who escaped Herne Bay and their father. Her sister Sally didn’t. Instead, she drinks. But when their mother dies, Kate is forced to return to the old family home. And on her first night she is woken by a terrifying scream. What secret has Kate stumbled upon? And is she strong enough to uncover the truth . . . and make it out alive?” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Mackenzie’s Mountain, by Linda Howard
“Mary Elizabeth Potter is a self-appointed spinster with no illusions about love. When she meets Wolf Mackenzie, a man with a chip on his shoulder the size of Wyoming, she sets out to convince the whole town he’s a man worth loving. But Wolf’s not sure he’s ready for the taming of Wolf Mackenzie.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Fear, by Dirk Kurbjuweit
“Randolph insists he had a normal childhood, though his father kept thirty loaded guns in the house. Now he has an attractive, intelligent wife and two children, enjoys modest success and has just moved into a beautiful flat in a respectable part of Berlin. Life seems perfect—until his wife, Rebecca, meets the man living in the basement below. Their downstairs neighbour is friendly at first, but soon he starts to frighten them—and when Randolph fails to act, the situation quickly spins out of control.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover August Snow, by Stephen Mack Jones
“Tough, smart, and struggling to stay afloat, former detective August Snow is the embodiment of Detroit. It’s not long before he’s summoned to the home of business magnate Eleanore Paget, who wants August to investigate the increasingly unusual happenings at her private wealth management bank. August declines, and a day later, Paget is dead. What begins as an inquiry into Paget’s death soon drags August into a rat’s nest of Detroit’s most dangerous criminals.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton
Cry the Beloved Country is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its contemporaneity, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry the Beloved Country is a work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Prophetic insights – New eBook Fiction

What will 2017 bring? It’s hard to say with certainty, but perhaps some clues lie in this month’s new releases from Overdrive. Will there be drama and mystery as seen in The Paris Librarian? Tragedy and conflict as portrayed by Even in Paradise? Or the dark humour of The Unthinkable Thoughts of Jacob Green? For more prophetic insights, sign up now!

Overdrive cover The Unthinkable Thoughts of Jacob Green, by Joshua Braff
“Jacob Green doesn’t mean to disappoint his family, but he can’t help thinking the most unthinkable (and very funny) thoughts. If only he could confront his overbearing father and tell him he doesn’t want to sing in synagogue, attend est classes or write the perfect thank-you note. But, of course, he can’t. That would be unthinkable.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Forty Rooms, by Olga Grushin
“A modern woman will inhabit forty rooms in her lifetime. They form her biography, from childhood to death. For our protagonist, the first rooms she is aware of are those that make up her family’s Moscow apartment. We follow this child as she leaves home to study in America, and discovers sexual happiness and love. But her hunger for adventure will open up more ambiguous rooms, rooms full of ghosts and unknown trade-offs.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover One Hundred Twenty-One Days, by Michèle Audin
“This debut novel by mathematician and Oulipo member Michèle Audin retraces the lives of French mathematicians over several generations through World Wars I and II. The narrative oscillates stylistically from chapter to chapter—at times a novel, fable, historical research or diary—locking and unlocking codes, culminating in a captivating, original reading experience.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Dying Trade, by Peter Corris
“Meet Cliff Hardy. Smoker, drinker, ex-boxer. And private investigator. When the wealthy Bryn Gutteridge hires Hardy to help his sister, it looks as if blackmail is the problem. Until the case becomes more brutal, twisted and shocking than even Hardy could have guessed. Described by The Age as ‘a quintessentially Australian literary icon.'” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Even in Paradise, by Elizabeth Nunez
“Peter Ducksworth, a Trinidadian widower of English ancestry, retires to Barbados. He decides to divide his land among his three daughters while he is alive, his intention not unlike that of King Lear. But Lear made the fatal mistake of confusing flattery with love, and so does Ducksworth. Feeling snubbed by his youngest daughter, Ducksworth decides that only after he dies will she receive her portion of the land, setting in motion the very strife he hoped to prevent.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Paris Librarian, by Mark Pryor
“Hugo Marston’s friend Paul Rogers dies unexpectedly in a locked room at the American Library in Paris. The police conclude that Rogers died of natural causes, but Hugo is certain mischief is afoot. As Hugo delves into the library’s stacks, he begins to hear rumours about a famous actress, a recently donated collection and a dagger. But to uncover the truth, he must return to the scene of a decades-old crime.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Some Women, by Emily Liebert
“Annabel Ford has everything under control, but when her husband announces that he’s leaving, she’s blind-sided. Piper Whitley has done her best to balance it all—raising her daughter Fern by herself while advancing her career. Only now that she’s met the man of her dreams, Fern’s absentee father shows up, throwing everything into a tailspin. Mackenzie Mead has many reasons to count her blessings, but with an imperious mother-in-law and a husband with whom she can no longer connect, something has to give.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Bohr Maker, by Linda Nagata
“Nanotechnology saturates the world, but strict laws regulate its use, and death follows for those caught in violation. The threat of death means little though, to a man already condemned to die. Nikko—post human, desperate to escape his fate—steals a forbidden nanomachine. But the theft goes awry and the nanomachine escapes into the wild–igniting a desperate race to contain it before the definition of ‘human’ changes for all time.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad
Heart of Darkness tells the story of Charles Marlow, an English man who journeys into the African jungle. The difference between Conrad’s novella and other classic adventure fictions, like Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, is that Heart of Darkness goes beyond classic motifs to explicitly deal with questions of racism, exploitation and colonization. Readers ultimately understand that the darkness of the title does not only stand for the horrors in the African wilderness, but for the cruelty of the colonizer’s heart.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

New eBook Fiction in October

This month’s additions to Overdrive showcase the changing role of the hero. For traditionalists, we have T.H. White’s The Once and Future King, while those with a taste for grittier protagonists can browse several new detective series, including the award-winning A Rising Man. And if you don’t like heroes at all? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered, too – the events in the Booker-nominated His Bloody Project are described by an entire community. To start a quest of your own, just sign in here.

Overdrive cover Birds Without Wings, by Louis de Bernières
“Set against the backdrop of the collapsing Ottoman Empire, Birds Without Wings traces the fortunes of one small community in south-west Anatolia, a town in which Christian and Muslim traditions have co-existed peacefully for centuries – until war is declared and the peaceful fabric of life is threatened with destruction. Epic in sweep, intoxicating in sensual detail, it is an enchanting masterpiece.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Sweetbitter, by Stephanie Danler
“22-year-old Tess has come to New York to take on her destiny. After she stumbles into a coveted job at a renowned restaurant, we spend the year with her as she learns the punishing, privileged life of a backwaiter, on and off duty. She’s pulled into the thrall of two other servers—a handsome bartender she falls hard for, and an older woman whose connection to both young lovers is murky, sensual and overpowering. These two will prove to be Tess’s hardest lesson of all.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Portable Veblen, by Elizabeth Mckenzie
“A laugh-out-loud love story with big ideas – and squirrels. Can squirrels speak? Do snails scream? Will a young couple, newly engaged, make it to their wedding day? Will their dysfunctional families ruin everything? Will they be undone by the advances of a very sexy, very unscrupulous heiress to a pharmaceuticals corporation? Is getting married even a remotely reasonable idea in the twenty-first century? And what in the world is a ‘Veblen’ anyway?” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Dirt Road, by James Kelman
“Murdo, a teenager obsessed with music, dreams of a life beyond his Scottish island home. His dad Tom has recently lost his wife and is terrified of losing control of what remains of his family. Both are in search of something as they set out on an expedition into the American South. As they travel they encounter a new world and we discover whether the hopes of youth can conquer the fears of age.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover His Bloody Project, by Graeme Macrae Burnet
“A brutal triple murder in a remote northwestern crofting community in 1869 leads to the arrest of a young man by the name of Roderick Macrae. There’s no question that Macrae is guilty, but the police and courts must uncover what drove him to murder. A story ingeniously recounted through the accused’s memoir, trial transcripts and newspaper reports, His Bloody Project is a riveting literary thriller, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover A Rising Man, by Abir Mukherjee
“Captain Sam Wyndham, former Scotland Yard detective, is a new arrival to Calcutta. Desperately seeking a fresh start after his experiences during the Great War, Wyndham has been recruited to head up a new post in the police force. But with barely a moment to acclimatise, he is caught up in a murder investigation that will take him into the dark underbelly of the British Raj. The start of an atmospheric and enticing new historical crime series.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Last Days of Night, by Graham Moore
“New York, 1888. A young lawyer named Paul Cravath takes a case that seems impossible to win. Paul’s client, George Westinghouse, has been sued by Thomas Edison over a billion-dollar question: Who invented the light bulb and holds the right to power the country? The task facing Cravath is daunting, and the stakes are immense: the winner of the case will illuminate America.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Once and Future King, by T. H. White
“T.H. White’s masterful retelling of the Arthurian legend is an abiding classic. The Once and Future King contains all five books about the early life of King Arthur (The Sword in the Stone, The Witch in the Wood, The Ill-Made Knight, The Candle in the Wind and The Book of Merlyn). White brings to life the major British epic with brilliance, grandeur, warmth and charm.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Jake’s Long Shadow, by Alan Duff
“The third volume in the hard-hitting, best-selling Once Were Warriors trilogy. The millennium has changed but have the Hekes? Where are they now? Son Abe who has rejected violence but violence finds him; Polly, as beautiful as her sister Grace, who committed suicide; the gang leader, Apeman, who killed Tania, what’s prison like, does it change a man? And then there’s Jake Heke, casting his long shadow over everyone.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description)

New eBook Fiction in September

This month’s titles from Overdrive are set across the globe, from the sand hills of Nebraska to a Swedish caravan park. And we haven’t forgotten the Pacific: Breaking Connections by Albert Wendt takes place in both New Zealand and Hawaii. So have your map, compass and e-reader at the ready, and enjoy!

Overdrive cover Five Rivers Met on a Wooded Plain, by Barney Norris
“One quiet evening in Salisbury, the peace is shattered by a serious car crash. At that moment, five lives collide – a flower seller, a schoolboy, an army wife, a security guard and a widower. As one of those lives hangs in the balance, the stories of all five unwind, drawn together by connection and coincidence into a web of love, grief, disenchantment and hope that perfectly represents the joys and tragedies of small town life.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Reconstructing Amelia, by Kimberly McCreight
“Single mother Kate is in the meeting of her career when she is interrupted by a call to say her teenaged daughter Amelia has been suspended from school. Torn between her head and her heart, Kate eventually arrives at St Grace’s, only to find her daughter has jumped off the roof of the school, apparently in shame. A grieving Kate can’t accept that her daughter would kill herself: Amelia would never leave her alone like this. So begins an investigation into Amelia’s troubled world.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Work Like Any Other, by Virginia Reeves
“Roscoe T. Martin sets his sights on a new type of power spreading at the start of the 20th century: electricity. But when his wife inherits her father’s farm, Roscoe has to give it up, with great cost to his pride, marriage and family. Realising he might lose it all, he decides to siphon energy from the state, ushering in a period of bounty and happiness. Then a young man is electrocuted on their land. Roscoe is arrested for manslaughter and must now carve out a place in a violent new world.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Black Water, by Louise Doughty
“Harper wakes every night, terrified of the sounds outside his hut in Bali. He is afraid that his past as a mercenary has caught up with him. Then he meets Rita, a woman with her own tragedies, and begins a passionate affair. Their relationship makes Harper realise that exile comes in many forms – but can Rita and Harper save each other while also putting themselves at risk? Black Water turns around the 1965 Indonesian massacres, one of the great untold tragedies of the 20th century.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover I Am Behind You, by John Ajvide Lindqvist
“Four families wake up one morning in their caravans on an ordinary campsite in southern Sweden. However, during the night something strange has happened: everything else has disappeared. The sky is blue, but there is no sign of the sun; there are no trees, no flowers, no birds. As the holiday-makers try to come to terms with what has happened, they are forced to confront their deepest fears. Can any of them find a way back to reality?” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Vile Bodies, by Evelyn Waugh
“The Bright Young Things of 1920s Mayfair, including struggling writer Adam Fenwick-Symes and the aristocratic Nina Blount exercise their inventive minds and vile bodies in every kind of capricious escapade, whether it is promiscuity, dancing or sports cars. But in the distance, war looms again… Evelyn Waugh’s 1930 satire shows a new generation emerging in the years after the First World War, revealing the darkness and vulnerability beneath the glittering surface of the high life.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Breaking Connections, by Albert Wendt
“A dynamic group has emerged in Auckland whose members refer to themselves as the Tribe. Mainly Polynesian, they grow up together and become successful professionals, bound by the self-destructive Aaron. But when Daniel receives a call in Hawaii telling him Aaron has been killed, he must return to New Zealand and step into the most dangerous crisis he has ever faced. What has the Tribe become?” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Bones of Paradise, by Jonis Agee
“Ten years after the Seventh Cavalry massacred more than two hundred Lakota men, women and children at Wounded Knee, J.B. Bennett, a white rancher, and Star, a young Native American woman, are murdered on J.B.’s land. The deaths bring together the Bennett family: J.B.’s cunning father, Drum; his estranged wife, Dulcinea; and his teenage sons. As the mystery of these twin deaths unfolds, the secrets of the dysfunctional Bennetts are revealed, exposing the conflicted heart of a nation.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Classic eAudiobook Fiction in August

We’ve had lots of great classic novels and plays added to Overdrive this month, so what better time to finally enjoy these stories you’ve always intended to read. There’s even complete radio plays performed with a full cast to really tell the story in all its glory.

Overdrive cover The History Boys, by Alan Bennett (Audiobook)
“Alan Bennett’s award-winning play as heard on BBC Radio 3 features the National Theatre cast. After a sell-out national tour and an extended stage run, Alan Bennett’s phenomenally successful play transfers to BBC Radio 3. At a boys’ grammar school in Sheffield, eight boys are being coached for the Oxbridge entrance exams. It is the mid-eighties, and the main concern of the unruly bunch of bright sixth-formers is getting out, starting university – and starting life.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare (Audiobook)
“Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, The Winter’s Tale is no lightweight affair; it explores the darker themes of rage, jealousy, treason, and death. Yet though initially an intense psychological drama, as the play unfolds it takes on a lighter and more comedic tone. In short, there is something for everyone. What was once a day’s entertainment for the groundlings and the gentry is now the perfect diversion for that long commute.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley (Audiobook)
“This is the story of Victor Frankenstein: a man obsessed with discovering the secret of life and cheating death; a man who brings to life to a body built from corpses; and a man who rejects this would-be child…But who is truly the monster?” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier (Audiobook)
“When Maxim de Winter brings his shy new bride to his beautiful stately home on the Cornwall coast, it seems like all her dreams have come true. But she soon finds that Manderley is haunted by the shadow of Maxim’s first wife, Rebecca, who died the year before. As the hot summer fades, the mystery of Rebecca’s death grows, weaving a spell of fear and foreboding. In a series of climactic revelations, Rebecca’s memory is finally laid to rest, but at what cost? Harriet Walter reads Daphne du Maurier’s Gothic masterpiece.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Sons and Lovers, by D. H. Lawrence (Audiobook)
“The initial romance between a woman of ‘good family’ and a miner does not last long into marriage as they face tough economic realities. The differences in background affect the next generation – the two sons William and Paul. Widely regarded as Lawrence’s masterpiece.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover An Unsuitable Job for a Woman, by P. D. James (Audiobook) “A gripping BBC Radio 4 full-cast dramatisation featuring young detective Cordelia Gray. Mark Calendar, 21 years old and in his final year at Cambridge, leaves university without warning and takes a job as a gardener. Eighteen days later he is found hanging in the cottage where he lived. The verdict at the inquest is suicide. Cordelia Gray, now sole proprietor of the Pryde Detective Agency, is hired by Mark’s father to piece together the facts surrounding his death.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Bell, by Iris Murdoch (Audiobook)
“A lay community of thoroughly mixed-up people is encamped outside Imber Abbey, home of an enclosed order of nuns. A new bell, legendary symbol of religion and magic, is rediscovered. Dora Greenfield, erring wife, returns to her husband. Michael Mead, leader of the community, is confronted by Nick Fawley, with whom he had disastrous relations, while the wise old Abbess watches and prays and exercises discreet authority. And everyone hopes to be saved, whatever that may mean…” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Death on the Nile, by Agatha Christie (Audiobook)
“John Moffatt stars as the famous Belgian detective in this BBC Radio 4 full-cast dramatisation of one of Christie’s most popular novels. Linnet Ridgeway has led a charmed life. Blessed with beauty, enormous wealth and a devoted husband, she has everything anyone could wish for. But as the happy couple set out on an idyllic honeymoon cruise on the Nile, storm clouds are gathering…” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Code of Woosters, by P. G. Wodehouse (Audiobook)
“In the best known of the Bertie and Jeeves series, Bertie’s aunt pressures him to steal a silver creamer, and he nearly gets lynched, arrested and engaged by mistake. As always, Jeeves is on hand with a last-minute brainstorm to set everything straight.” (Overdrive description)

A World of Pride and Prejudice

Did a work ever inspire offshoots, sequels, revisionings, reworkings, and movies as much as Pride and Prejudice? I think not, but feel free to correct me. If you’re a fan of Pride and Prejudice the collection of material below will either delight you or make your toes curl in horror (or both in turns).

The Horror-Mashup Family

This is a big thing. Seth Grahame-Smith shocked the world in 2009 with Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, creating a whole new genre of fiction (the Classic/Horror Mashup – complete with searching book club questions). Along with various other classics (Sense and Sensibility and Sea-Monsters, and most recently Romeo and Juliet and Vampires), there’s a growing family of Pride and Prejudice mashups:

Continued stories and sequels (often featuring P & P characters that someone thought deserved more)

You may have done this yourself at some time, briefly, in your head.

Darcy Diarises

  • Mr Darcy’s diary, Maya Slater (large print)
  • Darcy’s diary, Amanda Grange (large print) – Amanda Grange also wrote Mr Knightley’s Diary and Edmund Bertram’s Diary.

Placing P&P in an updated, mostly chick-lit context

Two mysteries

Graphic Novel!

On the screen, big and small

Why? Why? Some literary criticism

Shorter stories make better films?

An average film is about 2 hours long; the average novel is at least 50,000 words. Film adaptations of novels are plentiful, with some good, some bad, and some ugly, and nearly all having someone leaving the theatre suggesting “the book was better”. Is this because films struggle to do justice to so many words, and if so, is a shorter story therefore a better bet? Here are ten films, and the novellas and short stories they are based on, including some classics (both literary and celluloid). 

  1. Angels and Insects (1995) – ‘Morpho Eugenia’ by A S Byatt, in Angels and Insects (1992). A young naturalist marries into an aristocratic family in England in the 1800s.
  2. Apocalypse Now (1979) – Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (1902). The horror! Amazingly, a novella just over 100 pages long still manages to contain a story within a story.
  3. Away from Her (2006) – ‘The Bear Went Over the Mountain’ by Alice Munro, in Carried away: a selection of stories. Julie Christie was nominated for an Academy Award in 2007 for her portrayal of Fiona Anderson.
  4. The Birds (1963) – ‘The Birds’ by Daphne du Maurier, in The Birds and Other Stories. Classic Hitchcock!
  5. Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) – Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote (1958). Capote created Holly Golightly, but Audrey Hepburn cemented her place in pop culture.
  6. Brokeback Mountain (2005) – ‘ Brokeback Mountain’ by Annie Proulx in Close range: Wyoming stories (1999). More than just gay cowboys. Ang Lee won the Oscar for Best Director in 2006.
  7. The Dead (1987) – ‘The Dead’ by James Joyce, in Dubliners (1914). A Christmas dinner in turn of the (20th) century Ireland, starring Anjelica Huston.
  8. The Killers (1946, 1964) – ‘The Killers’ by Ernest Hemingway, in The Collected Stories. The DVD contains both the 1964 version starring Lee Marvin and the 1946 version with Burt Lancaster.
  9. Minority Report (2003) – ‘Minority Report’ by Philip K Dick, in Minority report. The three “precogs”, Arthur, Dashiell and Agatha, are named for legendary mystery writers Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie and Dashiell Hammett.
  10. The Shawshank Redemption (1994) – ‘Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption’ by Stephen King, in Different Seasons. I prefer the story title: Rita Hayworth is indeed the key.

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