Kamila Shamsie: Winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018

Kamila Shamsie, author of Home Fire has won the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018. The prize was previously known as the Bailey’s and the Orange Prize. The author is described as creating a book that “spoke for our times. Home Fire is about identity, conflicting loyalties love and politics.” Commended for her mastery, the book is written in five parts, each voicing their truth in the tale. Based on the struggles of Antigone who wrestled with loyalty to family or the ruling elite, this modern setting places characters sensitive to ethnicity, religion and ideologies. British Muslim characters, with family connections to extremism, face prejudice and personal dilemma in reaction to family, the state and justice.

Home fire / Shamsie, Kamila
“Isma is free. After years spent raising her twin siblings in the wake of their mother’s death, she is finally studying in America, resuming a dream long deferred. But she can’t stop worrying about Aneeka, her beautiful, headstrong sister back in London – or their brother, Parvaiz, who’s disappeared in pursuit of his own dream: to prove himself to the dark legacy of the jihadist father he never knew. Then Eamonn enters the sisters’ lives. Handsome and privileged, he inhabits a London worlds away from theirs. As the son of a powerful British Muslim politician, Eamonn has his own birthright to live up to – or defy. Is he to be a chance at love? The means of Parvaiz’s salvation? Two families’ fates are inextricably, devastatingly entwined in this searing novel that asks: what sacrifices will we make in the name of love? A contemporary reimagining of Sophocles’ Antigone, Home Fire is an urgent, fiercely compelling story of loyalties torn apart when love and politics collide – confirming Kamila Shamsie as a master storyteller of our times.” (Catalogue)

This Monday, special pre-school storytimes and kids’ press conference!

All systems are go, down at Central Library on Monday the 14th of August as the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults kicks off with a day full of exciting events. These unique awards celebrate the wonderful writers and illustrators from Aotearoa who give us so many great books to read and help to shape our identity as a country.

The day starts with three fantastic storytime sessions featuring finalists from the Book Awards so come along to hear the stories being read by their very own authors and illustrators.

9.30am-11am: Storytime sessions 

9.30am: “My Grandpa is a Dinosaur” read by Richard Fairgray and “The Day the Costumes Stuck” read by Toby Morris. Both of these books are very funny and destined to become family favourites. What would you do if your Grandpa’s pants needed tail holes? Imagine if you couldn’t get your party costume off and your parents didn’t even notice!

Continue reading “This Monday, special pre-school storytimes and kids’ press conference!”

2017 International Dublin Literary Award winner announced

Syndetics book coverThe 2017 winner of this prestigious award, The International Dublin Literary Award (previously known as the IMPAC prize) has been presented to Angolan writer Jose Eduardo Agualusa for his novel titled, A General Theory of Oblivion. Of Portuguese descent, his prize of €100,000 will be shared with his English translator Daniel Hahn.
A previous novel, published in 2006, titled The Book of Chameleons, won the International Foreign Fiction Prize in 2007.

2016 New Zealand Fiction prize winners announced

Syndetics book coverThis year’s Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize of $50,000, has been awarded to Catherine Chidgey for her novel The Wish Child. This is her fourth novel since her first, In a Fishbone Church, was published in 1998, and is thirteen years after her last novel, The Transformation.
The Hubert Church Best First Book Award for Fiction was awarded to Gina Cole for her short story collection Black Ice Matter.

 

Sebastian Barry wins 2016 Costa Book of the Year Award

Syndetics book coverThe winner of the Costa Book of the Year Award has been awarded to Sebastian Barry for his novel titled Days Without End. The Costa prize has five categories: First Novel, Novel, Biography, Poetry and Children’s Book, with one of the five winning books selected as the overall Costa Book of the Year and the prize of £30,000. This is the second time Sebastian Barry has received this award, the first being in 2008 for his novel titled The Secret Scripture.
Sebastian Barry was born in Ireland in 1955. His first novel was published in 1982; this was followed by eight other novels, two volumes of poetry and fourteen plays.

2016 Ngaio Marsh Award winners announced

Syndetics book coverSyndetics book coverCongratulations to the winners of the 2016 Ngaio Marsh Award for the Best Crime Novel and Best First Novel. Paul Cleave’s ninth publication titled Trust No One was awarded the Best Crime Novel. This is the third year he has won this award. Canadian-born writer Ray Berard was awarded the Best First Novel prize for Inside the Black Horse. Berard emigrated to New Zealand 15 years ago and now lives in Christchurch.

Winner of the 2016 Dublin Literary Award announced

Syndetics book coverThis year’s Dublin Literary Award with the prize of €100,000 has been presented to Akhil Sharma for his second novel titled Family Life. This moving novel, tells the story of an Indian family who move from Delhi to New York and was thirteen years in writing. Akhil Sharma is a native of Delhi, but now lives in New York and is assistant professor of English at Rutgers University. His first novel published in 2000, titled, An Obedient Father won the PEN/Hemingway Award.

Winner of the 2016 Ockham New Zealand Book Award for Fiction announced

Syndetics book coverThis year’s Ockham New Zealand Book Award for Fiction has been won by Stephen Daisley for his novel titled Coming Rain. This is his second published novel, the first titled Traitor, was set in Gallipoli during WW1 was published in 2010. Stephen Daisley was born in Raetihi in 1956, but now lives in Western Australia. He has worked in many different occupations, from soldier to shearer.
A very atmospheric novel, Coming Rain is set in Western Australia, it is a story about hard men, hard work, friendship and a love that can change everything.

2016 International Dublin literary Award shortlist announced

Syndetics book coverTen novels have been shortlist for the year’s International Dublin Literary Award. These have been selected from novels nominated by over 130 libraries around the world, most nominating up to 3 titles.

Included in the shortlist is the 2015 Man Booker Prize winner Marlon James’s novel titled, A Brief History of Seven Killings, and the 2015 Folio Prize winner Akhil Sharma’s novel titled, Family life. Syndetics book coverThey are joined by Pulitzer Prize winner Marilynne Robinson and two debut novelists, Mary Costello from Ireland and Scholastique Mukasonga from Rwanda.

The winner of the €100,000 prize will be announced in Dublin 9th June 2016.

Winner of 2015 Man Booker Prize announced

Syndetics book coverThis year’s Man Booker Prize winner is Marlon James, a 44 year old Jamaican writer, for his novel titled A Brief History of Seven Killings. He has had two previously novels published, he has a Master’s Degree in Creative Writing, and teaches English and Creative Writing where he lives in Minneapolis.
A Brief History of Seven Killings, set in Jamaica, explores the attempted assassinations of Bob Marley in the late seventies. Marlon James receives £50,000 as the 2015 Man Booker Prize winner.
This winning novel is also available to download from Wellington City Libraries eLibrary.