Ngaio Marsh Award winners 2019

Congratulations to the winners of the 2019 Ngaio Marsh awards! Dame Fiona Kidman has won this year’s award for Best Crime Novel with This Mortal Boy. Best First Novel was awarded to J. P. Pomare for Call Me Evie. The Non Fiction award went to Kelly Dennett for her followup on the disappearance of an Auckland teenager, The Short Life and Mysterious Death of Jane Furlong.

The Ngaio Marsh Awards originated in 2010 for excellence in New Zealand crime, mystery, and thriller writing. In 2016 the award for best First Novel was added and in 2017 another category was also added for the Best Non Fiction.


This mortal boy / Kidman, Fiona (print) (eBook) (eAudiobook)
“Albert Black, known as the ‘jukebox killer’, was only twenty when he was convicted of murdering another young man in a fight at a milk bar in Auckland on 26 July 1955. His crime fuelled growing moral panic about teenagers, and he was to hang less than five months later, the second-to-last person to be executed in New Zealand.But what really happened? Was this a love crime, was it a sign of juvenile delinquency? Or was this dark episode in our recent history more about our society’s reaction to outsiders? This is his story.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Syndetics book coverCall me Evie / J.P. Pomare.
“Meet Evie, a young woman held captive by a man named Jim in the isolated New Zealand beach town of Maketu. Jim says he’s hiding Evie to protect her, that she did something terrible back home in Melbourne. In a house that creaks against the wind, Evie begins to piece together her fractured memories of the events that led her here. Jim says he’s keeping her safe. Evie’s not sure she can trust Jim, but can she trust her own memories?” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

The short life and mysterious death of Jane Furlong / Dennett, Kelly
“The abduction and murder of teenager Jane Furlong is one of New Zealand’s most enduring mysteries. Jane was 17 when she disappeared from Auckland’s Karangahape Road in 1993.  Her body was found in 2012, 20 years later. Court reporter Kelly Dennett became interested after noticing Jane Furlong’s mother, Judith Furlong, sitting alone in a courtroom during a murder trial.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Check out the shortlist for the 33rd Arthur C. Clarke award!

The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond them into the impossible.” – Arthur C. Clarke

The prestigious Arthur C. Clarke award shortlist has just been announced. The award aims to honour the best science fiction novel of the year – 124 books were submitted and six have make the shortlist. The judges have selected a fantastically varied list from Simon Stålenhag’s graphic novel The Electric State to Ahmed Saadawi’s politically nuanced Frankenstein in Baghdad, as well as novels in the cyberpunk and military space opera genre. The judges will have a really tough time deciding who the final winner will be!

The 2019 Arthur C. Clarke Award shortlist:


Semiosis / Sue Burke.
“Colonists from Earth wanted the perfect home, but they’ll have to survive on the one they found. They don’t realize another life form watches…and waits… Only mutual communication can forge an alliance with the planet’s sentient species and prove that humans are more than tools.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)
Also available as an ebook.

Syndetics book coverThe electric state / Simon Stålenhag.
“In late 1997, a runaway teenager and her small yellow toy robot travel west through a strange American landscape where the ruins of gigantic battle drones litter the countryside, along with the discarded trash of a high-tech consumerist society addicted to a virtual-reality system. As they approach the edge of the continent, the world outside the car window seems to unravel at an ever faster pace, as if somewhere beyond the horizon, the hollow core of civilization has finally caved in.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverFrankenstein in Baghdad : a novel / Ahmed Saadawi ; translated from the Arabic by Jonathan Wright.
“From the rubble-strewn streets of U.S.-occupied Baghdad, Hadi — a scavenger and an oddball fixture at a local café — collects human body parts and stitches them together to create a corpse. His goal, he claims, is for the government to recognize the parts as people and to give them proper burial. But when the corpse goes missing, a wave of eerie murders sweeps the city, and reports stream in of a horrendous-looking criminal who, though shot, cannot be killed. Hadi soon realizes he’s created a monster, one that needs human flesh to survive–first from the guilty, and then from anyone in its path.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)
Also available as an ebook.

Syndetics book coverRosewater / Tade Thompson.
“Rosewater is a town on the edge. A community formed around the edges of a mysterious alien biodome, its residents comprise the hopeful, the hungry and the helpless – people eager for a glimpse inside the dome or a taste of its rumored healing powers. Kaaro is a government agent with a criminal past. He has seen inside the biodome, and doesn’t care to again — but when something begins killing off others like himself, Kaaro must defy his masters to search for an answer, facing his dark history and coming to a realization about a horrifying future.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Ngaio Marsh Award winners announced for 2017

Syndetics book coverRecently the 2017 Ngaio Marsh Award winners were announced. The Best Crime Novel was awarded to Fiona Sussman for her novel titled The Last Time We Spoke.
The Best First Novel prize was awarded to Finn Bell, for his novel titled Dead Lemons.
The Ngaio Marsh Awards originated in 2010 for excellence in New Zealand crime, mystery, and thriller writing. In 2016 the award for best First Novel was added and in 2017 another category was also added for the Best Non Fiction.

Congratulations to Wellington author Catherine Robertson

Syndetics book coverWe send our congratulations to Wellington author Catherine Robertson on winning the Fiction Award for her novel titled The Hiding Places, at the Arts Festival Library Carnival in Nelson.
This is her fourth novel, the first The Sweet Second Life of Darrell Kincaid, was published in 2011.  Although extremely busy with her writing and also her Masters in Creative Writing study at Victoria University, Catherine has always been very generous with her time at Wellington City Libraries’ events. We wish her well for a very promising future.

Ngaio Marsh Award for best crime novel announced

Syndetics book coverPaul Cleave has won this year’s Ngaio Marsh Award for his crime novel titled Five Minutes Alone.
This is his eighth crime novel, the first was published in 2006 and was titled The Cleaner. This is the second time he has won this award, winning previously in 2011, with his novel titled Blood Men published in 2010.
His novels have been translated into fifteen languages, and many have been shortlist for international crime writing awards.

2015 Ngaio Marsh Award

Syndetics book coverThe Ngaio Marsh Award made annually for the best crime, thriller or mystery written by a New Zealand citizen or resident, began in 2010. It show cases some of the best writing in this genre, and this year’s short-list is no exception. Featuring five of the country’s best known writers, the decision of the judging panel will be difficult.
The shortlist is:
Paul Cleave for Five minutes alone
Barbara Ewing for The Petticoat men
Paddy Richardson for Swimming in the dark
Tina Shaw for The Children’s pond
Paul Thomas for Fallout
The winner will be announced on 4th October in Christchurch.

Winner of the 2015 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award announced

Syndetics book coverThe British writer Jim Crace has been awarded this year’s IMPAC Dublin Literary Award of €100,000 for his novel titled, Harvest. Set in a small English village before the industrial revolution, this novel was also short-listed for the Man Booker prize in 2013.
Jim Crace is the author of 10 other novels, and two collections of short stories, the first titled Continent began his published career in 1986. His work has received numerous literary awards.

Post-apocalypse novel wins Arthur C Clarke Award

Syndetics book coverThe Canadian writer Emily St John Mandel has won the 2015 Arthur C. Clarke Award for her much acclaimed fourth novel titled Station Eleven. Set in the Year Twenty it follows a troupe of actors and musicians as they cross a devastated America bringing entertainment to the isolated survivors.
Previous winners of the prestigious science fiction award have been Margaret Atwood, China Mieville and Neal Stephenson.

2015 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award shortlist announced

Syndetics book coverSyndetics book coverTen novels have been selected from nominations to make up the shortlist for this year’s IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. One of the literary world’s largest annual awards, all nominations are made by 150 libraries from 39 countries.
This year’s shortlist has a true international flavour, with novels from Russian, Moroccan, Nigerian, Brazilian, and Irish authors. Also along with American and British authors there are two Australian authors listed. The winner will be announced on the 17th June 2015 in Dublin.