ComicFest 2019 – 5 minutes with Ant Sang

ComicFest is back for 2019! On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2 to 4 of May at the National Library there will be panels, talks and workshops all day long for comic-lovers of all ages. You can also pick up a free comic from us on May the 4th and celebrate Free Comic Book Day, courtesy of GRAPHIC! For full programme click here and follow our updates on our Facebook event.

 

Next up on our special “5 minutes with…” series is Ant Sang. He is the author of celebrated graphic novels The Dharma Punks, Shaolin Burning, and co-author of Helen and the Go-Go Ninjas. Ant was the designer for the animated television show bro’Town. When not writing and drawing, he teaches ‘Comics and Graphic Novels’ at Manukau Institute of Technology. Ant Sang appears at ComicFest with the support of Penguin Books.

 

Q: What first got you interested in comics?
A: My childhood was filled with comics and I’ve loved them for as long as I can remember. I’ve always loved the way a comic can magically transport a reader to an imaginary world.

Q: What is your average day like?
A: My days vary a lot. When I’m working on a big project like a graphic novel, I’ll spend long hours writing or drawing all day (and often into the late night). I juggle this with freelance work; book illustrations, storyboards for television commercials etc. Twice a week, I teach comics at Manukau Institute of Technology, as part of the Creative Arts programme.

Q: Can you tell us about a current or recent project you’ve worked on?
A: The most recent comics project I’ve completed is the graphic novel Helen and the Go-Go Ninjas, which was a collaboration with author Michael Bennett. It’s a wild sci-fi, time-travel, dystopian future story.

Q: Do you have any traditions or rituals that help you when you get to work?
A: I usually get into the mood by choosing music to listen to while I work. I might listen to the same song a couple of times to get myself into the right mood for the scene or artwork I’m going to work on.

Q: Who/what is your biggest influence or inspiration?
A: I’ve had so many influences at different stages of my life. When I was a kid I’d spend hours copying Asterix and Disney drawings. As a teenager I was a huge Frank Frazetta fan. More recently I love the brush work of Paul Pope; the detail, energy and speed lines of James Harren; and also the storytelling of manga comics from classics like Akira to more contemporary stuff like Goodnight Punpun. Independent and alternative comics are a big influence on me also, in terms of subject matter and creating personal stories which have emotional impact; artists like Chester Brown, Dan Clowes, and Julie Doucett really float my boat.

Q: What or who are your favourite NZ comics or creators?
A: There’s too many to mention aren’t there. Off the top of my head Dylan Horrocks, Tim Kidd, Karl Wills, Sarah Laing, Indira Neville, Ross Murray, Ben Stenbeck and the late (and great) Barry Linton and Martin Emond.

Q: What is your dream comic project?
A: I think my dream comic project is always the next comic I’m thinking up. I’m super excited about my next idea, which is far from fully-formed. I’m exploring the idea of doing a wild, no-holds-barred, web-comic. I want to do a short comic (maybe 60 pages, I’m calling it a ‘graphic novella’) – a simple story with an emphasis not so much on plot but on the experience itself.

Q: What are you excited to share with ComicFest attendees? Just a taster!
A: At MIT I’ve been teaching a way to learn (and make) comics using individual panels, which was inspired by the way Chester Brown makes his comics. I’m keen to show this method in my workshop.

Q: If you were to enter our cosplay contest, who/what would you dress up as?
A: I can’t imagine ever doing cosplay lol.

You can find Ant online at
Instagram: @antasang_art
Blog/Website:  www.antsang.co.nz/

New and Classic Manga on Overdrive!

We’ve recently added a slew of new and classic manga to our eLibrary catalogue on Overdrive, and it’s available for you to download and read on any device! Included are such fan-favourites as Tokyo Ghoul and Attack on Titan, and the original best-selling science-fiction manga Astro Boy by Japan’s own ‘God of Manga‘ Osamu Tezuka.

Due to the closure of the Central Library reserves are now free, and you may request to pick up an item from any Wellington City Libraries branch. So now is the perfect chance to check out our wide selection of Japanese comics, including Shigeru Mizuki’s Showa: A History of Japan and the latest manga from the creator of Tenkonkinkreet. Just ask at any enquiry desk or click the Place Reserve button when you search the item in our catalogue.

AVAILABLE on OVERDRIVE

Overdrive cover Tokyo Ghoul, Volume 1, Sui Ishida (ebook)
Volumes 1 to 5 now available to borrow on Overdrive
“Shy Ken Kaneki is thrilled to go on a date with the beautiful Rize. But it turns out that she’s only interested in his body—eating it, that is. When a morally questionable rescue transforms him into the first half-human half-Ghoul hybrid, Ken is drawn into the dark and violent world of Ghouls, which exists alongside our own. Rated: T+” (Overdrive description)

 

Overdrive cover Attack on Titan, Volume 1, Hajime Isayama (ebook)
Volumes 1 to 16 now available to borrow on Overdrive
“In this post-apocalyptic sci-fi story, humanity has been devastated by the bizarre, giant humanoids known as the Titans. Little is known about where they came from or why they are bent on consuming mankind. Seemingly unintelligent, they have roamed the world for years, killing everyone they see. For the past century, what’s left of man has hidden in a giant, three-walled city. People believe their 100-meter-high walls will protect them from the Titans, but the sudden appearance of an immense Titan is about to change everything. Winner of the 2011 Kodansha Manga Award (Shonen) and nominated for the prestigious Osamu Tezuka Cultural Prize for 2012.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Astro Boy, Volumes 1 & 2, Osamu Tezuka (ebook)
Volumes 1 to 8 now available to borrow on Overdrive
“Dark Horse proudly presents one of the crown jewels of manga-Astro Boy! Created by the late Osamu Tezuka, a revered animator and cartoonist (who created over 150,000 pages of comics in his career!) considered the Walt Disney of Japan, Astro Boy was the first manga series to be adapted to animation and became a worldwide phenomenon, making Astro Boy the Mickey Mouse of anime-a jet-powered, super-strong, evil-robot-bashing, alien-invasion-smashing Mickey Mouse, that is! Exciting, whimsical, and touching, Astro Boy hearkens back to the classic era of comics and animation, featuring stories that readers young and old will enjoy. This special edition combines the first two volumes of the collected Astro Boy, in one value-priced collection!” (Overdrive description)

AVAILABLE for FREE RESERVE

Showa, 1953-1989 : a history of Japan / Mizuki, Shigeru
“The final volume in the Eisner-nominated history of Japan; one of NPR’s Best Books of 2014 . Showa 1953-1989: A History of Japan” concludes Shigeru Mizuki’s dazzling autobiographical and historical account of Showa-period Japan, a portrait both intimate and ranging of a defining epoch. The final volume picks up in the wake of Japan’s utter defeat in World War II, as a country reduced to rubble struggles to rise again. The Korean War brings new opportunities to a nation searching for an identity. A former enemy becomes their greatest ally as the United States funnels money, jobs, and opportunity into Japan, hoping to establish the country as a bulwark against Soviet Communist expansion. Japan reinvents itself, emerging as an economic powerhouse. Events like the Tokyo Olympiad and the World’s Fair introduce a friendlier Japan to the world, but this period of peace and plenty conceals a populace still struggling to come to terms with the devastation of World War II.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Red snow / Katsumata, Susumu
“Continuing D+Q’s groundbreaking exploration of the fascinating world of Gekiga, this collection of short stories is drawn with great delicacy and told with subtle nuance by the legendary Japanese artist Susumu Katsumata. The setting is the premodern Japanese countryside of the author’s youth, a slightly magical world where ancestral traditions hold sway over a people in the full vigor of life, struggling to survive the harsh seasons and the difficult life of manual laborers and farmers. While the world they inhabit has faded into memory and myth, the universal fundamental emotions of the human heart prevail at the center of these tender stories.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Sunny. 1 / Matsumoto, Taiyō
“The latest manga masterpiece from the Eisner Award-winning creator of Tekkonkinkreet. What is Sunny? Sunny is a car. Sunny is a car you take on a drive with your mind. It takes you to the place of your dreams. Sunny is the story of beating the odds, in the ways that count. It’s the brand-new masterwork from Eisner Award-winner Taiyo Matsumoto, one of Japan’s most innovative and acclaimed manga artists. Translated by Tekkonkinkreet film director Michael Arias!” (Adapted from catalogue)

ComicFest 2019 – 5 minutes with Michel Mulipola

ComicFest is back for 2019! On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2 to 4 of May at the National Library there will be panels, talks and workshops all day long for comic-lovers of all ages. You can also pick up a free comic from us on May the 4th and celebrate Free Comic Book Day, courtesy of GRAPHIC! For full programme click here and follow our updates on our Facebook event.


Next on our “5 minutes with..” is Michel Mulipola. He is a self taught comic book artist from Auckland, New Zealand. Michel has been immersed in the world of comic books from the tender age of five and has wanted to draw comic books from that moment on. He has also done work for BOOM! Studios’ line of WWE comics, various anthologies and is currently working on the U.S comic book, Headlocked: The Last Territory.

Q: What first got you interested in comics?
A: I fell in love with comics before I started school. I stumbed across my Uncle’s collection and instantly fell in love with the bright colours and bold characters.

Q: What is your average day like?
A: My average day is usually spent drawing comics, answering e-mails, scolling through social media and playing video games. Some days, you could find me at Arkham City Comics in Auckland or visiting schools as part of Duffy Books in Homes’ Role Model program.

Q: Can you tell us about a current or recent project you’ve worked on?
A: I’ve recently finished up a comic book for the NZ School Journals which should be in schools later this year and am currently working through the next volume of the Headlocked graphic novel series.

Q: Do you have any traditions or rituals that help you when you get to work?
A: I don’t have any traditions or rituals. I kind of play the day by ear and go with the flow.

Q: Who/what is your biggest influence or inspiration?
A: I don’t really have ONE person who is the biggest influence for me. The medium of comic books itself is the inspiration. In terms of artists, as a kid growing up in the 80s and 90s, I can’t go past Jim Lee’s X-Men run as an influence on my art.

Q: What or who are your favourite NZ comics or creators?
A: Funnily enough, Roger Langridge and Dylan Horrocks are some of my favourite NZ comic creators. I also will have to say Toby Morris and Ant Sang are very good friends of mine and Ben Stenbeck’s work is always freakin’ awesome!

Q: What is your dream comic project?
A: I’ve had an opportunity to do short dream projects with BOOM! Studios’ WWE comics, drawing some of my favourite wrestlers. I would love to be able to illustrate a Green Lantern comic sometime as he is my all time favourite superhero.

Q: What are you excited to share with ComicFest attendees? Just a taster!
A: I’m excited to share my story as a Polynesian comic book artist. And maybe I’ll show off some art too…

Q: If you were to enter our cosplay contest, who/what would you dress up as?
A: As someone who constantly dresses up in tights and beats people up, I am no stranger to cosplay.
I have cosplayed as Spider-Gwen, Star-Lord, Green Lantern, Bane and the Green Power Ranger in the past. As for now, I would love to cosplay as Thanos. I’ve got the Infinity Gauntlet, I just need to paint my skin purple and grow a scrotum chin.

You can find Michel online in the following places:
Instagram: @bloodysamoanart
Twitter: @bloodysamoan
Blog/Website: bloodysamoan.com

Meaningful discoveries: Latest Travel Books

With an increasing focus on ‘top ten’ type destinations and planning, sometimes we forget that the best places to visit are often those along the road less travelled. Our latest books hope to inspire readers to trust the adventure and thrill of discovery. A few of our picks show a new side to popular destinations, while others give some first-hand perspective on how we can open our hearts and minds to the wonder of wherever we may end up.

Green nomads, wild places / Brown, Bob
Visit some of the most remote and beautiful places of south and west Australia in Green Nomads Wild Places, Bob Brown and partner Paul Thomas’s three-month adventure across Australia. They floated in hidden harbours and on ancient rivers, climbed over age-old rock formations, and camped at isolated Bush Heritage Australia properties. Bob Brown and Paul Thomas remind us how extraordinary and diverse is our natural world.” (Catalogue)

Rediscovering travel : a guide for the globally curious / Kugel, Seth
“An indispensable companion for rookie and veteran travelers alike that promises to revolutionize both how and why we vacation. Woven throughout with vivid tales of his perfectly imperfect adventures, Rediscovering Travel explains–often hilariously–how to make the most of new digital technologies without being shackled to them… Kugel shows how we too can rediscover the joy of discovery.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Sicilian splendors : discovering the secret places that speak to the heart / Keahey, John
Sicilian Splendors explores the history, politics, food, Mafia, and people which John Keahey encounters throughout his travels during his return to Sicily. Through conversing with natives and immersing himself in culture, Keahey illustrates a brand new Sicily no one has ever talked about before. Keahey not only serves as a guide through the marvel of Sicily’s identity, but he also looks deeply into Sicily’s soul.” (Catalogue)

Off the rails : a train trip through life / Severgnini, Beppe
“In this witty and entertaining collection of travel tales, an acclaimed journalist explores what his rail journeys have taught him about culture and identity. Filled with memorable characters and perceptive observations, it demonstrates–hilariously–what unites us.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Overdrive coverJapan Just for You, Denise Stephens (ebook)
Japan Just for You is for people wanting to create their own trip to Japan instead of doing someone else’s ‘must-see’ itinerary. Learn how to put your trip together, including how to make choices and decisions on your itinerary. There are some extremely popular and world-famous places which you may want to visit, or you may want to see the less-explored regions, or perhaps a bit of both.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive coverAlone Time, Stephanie Rosenbloom (ebook)
“Travel writer Stephanie Rosenbloom explores the joys and benefits of being alone in four mouth-watering journeys to the cities of Paris, Istanbul, Florence and New York. This is a book about the pleasures and benefits of savouring the moment, examining things closely, using all your senses to take in your surroundings, whether travelling to faraway places or walking the streets of your own city.”  (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Lands of Lost Borders, Kate Harris (ebook)
Lands of Lost Borders, winner of the 2018 Banff Adventure Travel Award, is the chronicle of Harris’s odyssey. Lands of Lost Borders explores the nature of limits and the wildness of the self that can never fully be mapped. Lands of Lost Borders celebrates our connection as humans to the natural world, and ultimately to each other—a belonging that transcends any fences or stories that may divide us.” (Adapted from Overdrive description)

What hours are you open this weekend?

Longer branch library hours start Monday 15 April for a number of our branch libraries. To tide us over till these new hours begin, we’ve made a few adjustments to our opening hours just for tomorrow, Saturday 13 April.

Library locations not listed below will be open their normal Saturday hours.

Stop in and top up your weekend reading material!

Extra branch hours – Saturday 13 April

Location Hours (13/04/19)
101 Wakefield Street 9am – 1pm
Karori Library 9am – 5pm
Kilbirnie Library 10am to 5pm
Newtown Library 10am to 5pm

Longer branch library hours start 15 April

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester today confirmed on-going additional opening hours and days for some branch libraries in response to the closure of the Central Library.

“In the two weeks after the Central Library was closed our branch libraries overall had 9276 more customer visits than when compared to the two weeks before – an increase of 21 percent.”

“During this time, some of our more popular neighbourhood libraries showed significant increases in customer visits, with Karori Library up 21 percent or 3567 more visits. Visits to Wadestown Library went up 20 percent, Brooklyn Library 18 percent and Newtown Library 6 percent.”

“After the Central Library closed, we acted quickly to relocate some of our Central Library staff out to our branch libraries to respond to the increased customer demand.  So I’m very pleased that with the continued support of our staff we’re able to add 31 opening hours per week across the branch library network. We think we have achieved a good match of customer demand with the right increased hours at the right locations, but this will be closely monitored over the coming weeks,” the Mayor said.

New hours will be in place from Monday 15 April at the following libraries:

  • Brooklyn Library – Wednesdays from 10am to 5.30pm (additional 3 hours)
  • Johnsonville Library – Wednesdays from 9.30am to 8pm (additional 2.5 hours)
  • Karori Library – Tuesdays from 9.30am to 8pm and Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 3 hours)
  • Miramar Library – Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 5 hours)
  • Newtown Library – Monday, Tuesday and Wednesdays from 10am to 8pm and Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 7.5 hours)
  • Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library – Saturdays 9.30am to 5pm (additional 1.5 hours)
  • Wadestown Library – Wednesdays from 10am to 5.30pm and Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 8.5 hours)

Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, who holds Wellington City Council’s community facilities portfolio, says the first pop-up in Manners Street is due to open in late May, with other library pop-ups opening throughout the year. “The new hours may gradually reduce over time as the CBD library network pop-ups are opened,” she said.

Further details of the locations and services available at the library pop-ups will be announced in the coming weeks. Services are likely to include selections of popular and new items, reserve pick up service, returns, wifi and internet access. Library staff will be on hand to answer questions, process payments, register new customers, and provide support and advice on the wide range of online content available through our eLibrary.

It is anticipated the pop-up service hours will include evenings and weekends.

School holiday fun at Wellington City Libraries

This school holidays brings a bunch of great events where kids can explore earth science, learn about the environment, or kick back and watch a movie. From virtual reality to craft activities, there is something for all ages.

Let’s Go Lego

At Let’s Go Lego, children’s creative skills will be put to the test as they use our Lego collections to design and build masterpieces. Each session will have a different theme that will inspire kids to hone their skills and become a Lego Legend. Bookings not required. Suitable for ages 5+

Monday 15th April, 3.30 – 4.30pm at Newtown Library

Tuesday 16th April 1 – 3pm at Island Bay Community Centre

Thursday 18th April 10am – 12pm at Churton Park Community Centre

Saturday 20th April 2 – 3pm at Karori Library

Earth Science 101

Join experts from Victoria University to learn about the amazing geology of our city – rock formations, fault lines, earthquakes and more. Come along prepared to do some hands-on science as well! Suitable for ages 5+.

Monday 15th April 2 – 3pm at Johnsonville Library

Tuesday 16th April 2 – 3pm at Karori Library

Wednesday 17th April 11am – 12pm at Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library

Wednesday 17th April 2 – 3pm at Miramar Library

Family Movie

Bring a blanket and pillow, and relax at our fun family movies. A different G rated movie from the library collection will be showing each time, and are suitable for the whole family. Recommended for ages 4+.

Thursday 18th April 4 – 5.30pm and 6 – 7.30pm at Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library

Easter Rock Painting

At this kid’s craft session, little ones can paint up some special rocks to hide around the suburb for Easter. No need to bring anything, we’ve got the rocks, the paint, the brushes and more! #WGTNRocks. Suitable for ages 4+.

Thursday 18th April 1 – 3pm at Island Bay Community Centre

Recycled Art

Kids can let out their inner artist as we use recyclable material to create inspiring artworks from scratch! They can join in to make a huge collaborative sculpture, or make your their piece to take home. Suitable for ages 4+.

Wednesday 17th April 2 – 3.30pm at Newlands Community Centre

Thursday 18th April 11am – 12pm at Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library

Wednesday 24th April 10am – 12pm at Churton park Community Centre

Friday 26th April 11am – 12pm Wadestown Library

VR Experience

Virtual reality (VR) offers us a new and exciting way to learn about science and the world around us. Children can explore the wonders of our planet’s most extreme locations from the comfort of your local library. Numbers are limited, bookings required. Reserve seats by contacting the event library. Suitable for ages 6+.

Tuesday 23rd April 2 – 3pm at Johnsonville Library

Wednesday 24th April 2 – 3pm at Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library

Friday 26th April 11am – 12pm at Khandallah Library

Friday 26th April 2 – 3pm at Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library

Green Storytime

Help the library celebrate the lead-up to Earth Day by coming along to this special storytime all about the environment – and how we fit in it! Magical eco-stories and crafts for the whole family to enjoy. Suitable for all ages.

Tuesday 16th April 2 – 3pm at Brooklyn Library

Saturday 27th April 11am – 12pm Karori Library

All events are free. Bookings are not required, except for the VR experience. All children must be accompanied by caregivers at every event.

Mystery Writers Panel this Saturday night at Karori

Are you a fan of mysteries? The Ngaio Marsh Awards and Wellington City Libraries invites you to Mystery in the Library this Saturday night (13 April, 6pm, at Karori Library), a fantastic (and free!) after-hours event featuring four outstanding and highly acclaimed local storytellers.

Dame Fiona Kidman, Jennifer Lane, Kelly Dennett and Kirsten McDougall will discuss how they craft memorable characters and page-turning storylines, whether fictional or factual, and infuse their books with real-life issues and insights into people and society. Brannavan Gnanalingam will prosecute the offenders.

You can read profiles of all our speakers at the links below:

Dame Fiona Kidman
Dame Fiona Kidman
Kirsten McDougall
Kirsten McDougall
Jennifer Lane
Jennifer Lane
Kelly Dennett
Kelly Dennett

 

Mystery Writers Panel Author Feature: Kelly Dennett

Are you a fan of mysteries? The Ngaio Marsh Awards and Wellington City Libraries invites you to Mystery in the Library, a fantastic (and free!) after-hours event featuring four outstanding and highly acclaimed local storytellers.

Photo by Emma Miller

When?
Saturday 13 April 2019

Where?
Karori Library (Please note the new location for this event)

What time?
6pm-7.30pm

One of the outstanding panellists at our Mystery in the Library event is Sunday Star-Times news director Kelly Dennett.  Her book The Short Life and Mysterious Death of Jane Furlong was published last year and is a gripping and empathetic account of the life and unsolved murder of Jane Furlong, a seventeen year old who disappeared from Auckland’s Karangahape Road in 1993.

We were lucky enough to talk to Kelly last week about her book.

Kelly told us she had forged strong relationships and trust with Jane’s friends and family as she painstakingly pieced all the different strands of the story of Jane’s disappearance together. As a result, she felt an enormous responsibility to Jane’s family and the memory of Jane to write the best book that she could. She felt that it was important to get the tone of the book right and concentrate on details that would bring the story and the charismatic personality of Jane to life rather than salacious and sensational details. Being able to read Jane’s diaries meant Kelly could get a good understanding of Jane’s character and she told us that she would often consider what Jane would think of the book as she was writing it.

We asked if Kelly had any thoughts on why unsolved murders and true crime, for example the television series Making a Murderer, were more popular than ever.  Kelly told us that because cold cases are about real people it is easy for us to relate to the characters, and put ourselves in their shoes. She also thinks that the genre gives audiences the appealing chance to be armchair detectives.

Jane’s body was discovered 19 years after her disappearance and her murder remains unsolved. Kelly believes that this case could be solved in the future and pointed to some recent arrests in Australia that have been made decades after the murders were committed.

Kelly speaks eloquently about her writing. Come along to Mystery in the Library this Saturday night (6-7:30pm) to hear more of the fascinating details of this book that has been called a “brave look at a cold case” (Otago Daily Times).

For more tasters of Kelly Dennett’s writing and The Short Life and Mysterious Death of Jane Furlong  listen to this interview with Wallace Chapman on RNZ or read this article in The Spinoff.

Join us on Saturday, 13 April at 6pm at Karori Library to hear Kirsten McDougall, Dame Fiona Kidman, Jennifer Lane, Kelly Dennett and chairperson Brannavan Gnanalingam discuss some fantastic works of mystery!

Know how you think, change how you feel

In this month’s selection of new health books: unpick and improve your sleeping habits, gain the tools to be more resilient with the anxieties of life, pick up a jump rope and give it a try as a fitness aid, and delve into the neuroscience of addiction.

How to sleep well : the science of sleeping smarter, living better, and being productive / Stanley, Neil
“Stop sabotaging your own sleep and finally wake up energised and refreshed. How to Sleep Well is a guidebook that can change your life. Whether you struggle to fall asleep, sleep too lightly, wake too often or simply cannot wake up, this book can help you get on track to the best sleep of your life.” (Catalogue)

The book of knowing : know how you think, change how you feel / Smith, Gwendoline
Aimed at teens – great to pass on to your teenager or have a read yourself: “Learn to understand the way you think and you will create resilience and be able to deal with many of the unnecessary anxieties of life.” (Catalogue)

Breathe : the 4-week plan to manage stress, anxiety and panic naturally / Birch, Mary
“In her years of teaching breathing retraining, Mary Birch has found that the majority of her clients experiencing symptoms of panic, anxiety and stress are overbreathing, sometimes significantly. …Most people will begin to feel an improvement in their symptoms within a week of implementing the strategies contained in this book, sometimes even within a few days. But Mary recommends a minimum four-week breathing retraining program for a reason: the body has to adjust to the new and improved breathing pattern, and this needs to become automatic, so that you do not revert to a disordered breathing pattern and chronic overbreathing in times of stress…” (adapted from Catalogue)

101 best jump rope workouts / Lee, Buddy
“A jump rope is the most effective fitness equipment you can own. Great for cardio, endurance and HIIT training a jump rope is versatile, portable, and efficient. Buddy Lee, recognized internationally as the world’s expert at jump rope fitness, provides 100 challenging, dynamic and varied workouts in this unique collection. …The Jump Rope Workout Handbook compiles a collection of more than 100 jump rope workouts optimized for effective weight loss, increased cardiovascular health, and improved athletic ability.” (adapted from Catalogue)

16:8 intermittent fasting / Chambers, Jaime Rose
“The health benefits of intermittent fasting are now indisputable, and 16:8 is the easiest and most effective fasting method. Jaime Rose Chambers is a practising dietitian who sees countless patients looking for advice on how to manage their weight. She prescribes intermittent fasting as a matter of course, as it’s by far the easiest and most effective tool for healthy weight control that she’s seen. This indispensable handbook has everything you need to know about intermittent fasting, including: – the latest science on 16:8 and 5:2, showing how intermittent fasting can not only help you control your weight, but also helps lower cholesterol, reduce blood pressure and protect against heart disease…” (adapted from Catalogue)

Never enough : the neuroscience and experience of addiction / Grisel, Judith
“A behavioral neuroscientist and a professor of psychology at Bucknell University, Grisel is also a former addict, which means she can explain not only the brain science behind addiction but the addict’s actual experience. She takes us through how different drugs act on the infinitely adaptable brain and shows how the thrill of the occasional high turns into a ceaseless craving for the next fix: there is never enough. Grisel aims to clarify a more effective and more compassionate response to a crisis in which one in every five people over the age of 14 is addicted…” (Catalogue)