#MatarikiMash Challenge #2: Wednesday 13th June

Nau mai, welcome to the Wellington Libraries second #MatarikiMash challenge for 2018! Your words for today are:

  • pā (fort)
  • pō (night time)
  • mahi (to work or activity)
  • kai (food)

Head over to Twitter to join in! (@wcl_library)

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up four te reo Māori kupu each morning, and all you need to do is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story or poem, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Readers Choice fiction selections

Reviews from library patrons are a great way to find out what people have loved reading from the new additions to the fiction collection. These selections are highlighted with Reader’s Choice stickers so that others can find great reading material.  You can find slips for Reader’s Choice reviews in new books, or ask staff for one if you have a review or recommendation to embellish the library collection.

Here are some recent reviews featuring an interesting mix of subjects and genres: mysteries, historical novels, science fiction, humour, psychological fiction, thrillers and New Zealand environmental activism.

The changeling : a novel / LaValle, Victor D.Book Jacket for: The changeling : a novel
“This captivating retelling of a classic fairy tale imaginatively explores parental obsession, spousal love, and the secrets that make strangers out of the people we love the most. It’s a thrilling and emotionally devastating journey through the gruesome legacies that threaten to devour us and the homely, messy magic that saves us, if we’re lucky.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “Excellent. An unusual voice, but marvellous blend of modernity and fairy-tale, with powerful themes and insight.  Very Satisfying.” (5/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Book Jacket for: Stranded

Stranded / MacLeod, Bracken
“Badly battered by an apocalyptic storm, the crew of the Arctic Promise find themselves in increasingly dire circumstances as they sail blindly into unfamiliar waters and an ominously thickening fog.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “I thought this book was suspenseful, gripping and well researched. Doesn’t lean on the numerous clichés of the horror genre which makes it so engaging.  A great read!” (4/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐

Book Jacket for: Hanna who fell from the skyHanna who fell from the sky / Meades, Christopher
“With lush, evocative prose, award-winning author Christopher Meades takes readers on an emotional journey into a fascinating, unknown world–and, along the way, brilliantly illuminates complexities of faith, identity and how our origins shape who we are.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “What a well written novel, thoroughly enjoyed it, well worth reading. Never read any of Meades novels before would love to read more of his material.” (5/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Book Jacket for: The last hoursThe last hours / Walters, Minette
“When the Black Death enters England through the port of Melcombe in Dorseteshire in June 1348, no one knows what manner of sickness it is or how it spreads and kills so quickly.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “Well written, engaging, couldn’t put down – read all night. Can’t wait for the sequel this year.” (5/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Book Jacket for: EurekaEureka / Quinn, Anthony
“Summer, 1967. As London shimmers in a heat haze and swoons to the sound of Sergeant Pepper, a mystery film – Eureka – is being shot by German wunderkind Reiner Kloss. The screenwriter, Nat Fane, would do anything for a hit but can’t see straight for all the acid he’s dropping.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “Was an enjoyable read, especially in it’s evocation of London in the ‘swinging sixties’.” (4/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐

Book Jacket for: KrusoKruso / Seiler, Lutz
“It is 1989, and a young literature student named Ed, fleeing unspeakable tragedy, travels to the Baltic island of Hiddensee. Long shrouded in myth, the island is a notorious destination for hippies, idealists, and those at odds with the East German state.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “I thought this book was compelling.  Via fantasy and fact Seiler deftly weaves a story about East German idealists, refugees and escapists told through the perspective of a challenged young man” (5/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Eye of the songbird / Munro, Michael
“What happens when a New Zealand team of scientists find one of the world’s largest flawless diamonds on the last piece of sovereign-less land, Antarctica?” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “A highly relevant New Zealand thriller with it’s plot centred on one of the big issues of the day; climate change.  Highly recommended” (4/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The miranda : a novel / Nicholson, G. J.
“The Miranda is at turns a biting satire about the secrets we keep from our neighbors, and about the invisible and unceasing state of war in which most Westerners unconsciously live.” (Catalogue)

Reader’s review: “I thought this book was like a Coen Brothers movie: darkly satirical. The detachment of the protagonist is key to this novel – he was a psychologist turned government agent training operatives to withstand torture. He is not disaffected, quite the reverse, but he is clinical , perceptive and interesting. A good dark read.” (4/5 stars)
⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

#MatarikiMash is back!! Here is challenge #1

Nau mai, welcome to the first #MatarikiMash challenge for 2018! Your words for today are:

  •  awa (river)
  • raumati (summer)
  • noho (to sit)
  • pounamu (greenstone)

Head over to Twitter to join in! (@wcl_library)

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks from today, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up four te reo Māori kupu each  morning, and all you need to do is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story or poem, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Kamila Shamsie: Winner of the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018

Kamila Shamsie, author of Home Fire has won the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018. The prize was previously known as the Bailey’s and the Orange Prize. The author is described as creating a book that “spoke for our times. Home Fire is about identity, conflicting loyalties love and politics.” Commended for her mastery, the book is written in five parts, each voicing their truth in the tale. Based on the struggles of Antigone who wrestled with loyalty to family or the ruling elite, this modern setting places characters sensitive to ethnicity, religion and ideologies. British Muslim characters, with family connections to extremism, face prejudice and personal dilemma in reaction to family, the state and justice.

Home fire / Shamsie, Kamila
“Isma is free. After years spent raising her twin siblings in the wake of their mother’s death, she is finally studying in America, resuming a dream long deferred. But she can’t stop worrying about Aneeka, her beautiful, headstrong sister back in London – or their brother, Parvaiz, who’s disappeared in pursuit of his own dream: to prove himself to the dark legacy of the jihadist father he never knew. Then Eamonn enters the sisters’ lives. Handsome and privileged, he inhabits a London worlds away from theirs. As the son of a powerful British Muslim politician, Eamonn has his own birthright to live up to – or defy. Is he to be a chance at love? The means of Parvaiz’s salvation? Two families’ fates are inextricably, devastatingly entwined in this searing novel that asks: what sacrifices will we make in the name of love? A contemporary reimagining of Sophocles’ Antigone, Home Fire is an urgent, fiercely compelling story of loyalties torn apart when love and politics collide – confirming Kamila Shamsie as a master storyteller of our times.” (Catalogue)

A note for our Brooklyn borrowers

From Monday 11 June there will be road and construction works outside Brooklyn Library. The Greater Wellington Regional Council, together with Metlink are working with Wellington City Council to upgrade the pavement/kerb and bus shelter at the front of the library. This includes replacing the existing bus shelter (attached to the front of the library) with a new, modernised hub shelter.

It is expected to take around four weeks to complete these improvements. During this period, library access will be unaffected during opening hours. Once completed, the replacement shelter will look like this:

Brooklyn Library with proposed new bus shelter

 

New audio gear for our music equipment lending collection: The Deluge

Libraries are no longer just places to get books. Need a PA system for a party, a speaking engagement, or a wedding? Playing a live or studio gig? Need to do some recording in the field, or hook up some gear to your laptop and make a new album at home? The new Library Music Equipment collection has what you need. We love Wellington music at Wellington City Libraries and we are here to help you make it.

The Deluge is an all-in-one, stand-alone, portable synthesizer, sequencer and sampler designed for the creation, performance and improvisation of electronic music, created by Wellingtonian Rohan Hill, and developed by Synthstrom Audible Limited, a boutique electronics manufacturer from Wellington, and is the latest addition to our Music Equipment Lending Collection

Deluge Kit:
Case Contents:
• Synthstrom Audible Deluge
• Instruction booklet
• USB Cable
$50 for 4 days/Overdue charge: $10 per day

Terms and Conditions to borrow this equipment are in place to ensure the safe use of the equipment and its timely return. A library fee ($50) will be payable to borrow for this equipment and borrower discounts (e.g. Community Services Card), do not apply. If the equipment is returned late, overdue fines will be payable ($10 per day).

To make a booking, fill out the Music Equipment form, telling us your details, specify the Deluge Kit (agreeing to the terms and conditions) and a staff member will contact you to confirm your pickup time.

[Note: Those who attended the Deluge workshops we held in May for New Zealand Music Month, were given the opportunity to pre-book a session with the Deluge. As a result it is now booked out until September. Bookings can be made any date after that.]

Classic rock songs inspired by books

It’s been a long established way of working in the creative world to look at other artistic spheres for inspiration, and this has very much been the case with musicians and literature. So with that fact in mind, we have compiled 20 songs or albums that have been inspired by novels. And in true music chart style we are going to post them as a double two-part gatefold blog. One with classic stars of rock and pop and one alternative and indie. So, pop pickers, our first cross over top ten is the classic artists!

Syndetics book coverAnimal farm ; 1984 / George Orwell.
David Bowie’s classic Diamond Dogs album was originally supposed to be the soundtrack for a musical based on George Orwell’s dystopian masterpiece 1984, but the Orwell estate had different ideas and soon put a stop to that.

Syndetics book coverThe fellowship of the ring : being the first part of the Lord of the Rings / by J.R.R. Tolkien.
Mega-decadent 70s rockers Led Zeppelin had a big interest in the occult and all things relating to J.R.R. Tolkien, with references to The Lord of the Rings in many of their songs. Perhaps the most obvious was ‘Ramble On’ from their 1969 album Led Zeppelin II which was their musical take on The Fellowship of the Ring. Seemingly Robert Plant was later very embarrassed by the lyrics.

Syndetics book coverWuthering heights / Emily Brontë ; with an introduction by Katherine Frank.
‘Wuthering Heights’ was Kate Bush’s debut single, released in 1978. Kate Bush was only 18 when she wrote her career starting smash hit single after watching the last ten minutes of a BBC miniseries of Wuthering Heights.

Syndetics book coverFrankenstein,or The modern Prometheus / Mary Shelley.
Mega smash hit ‘China in Your Hand’ by eighties soft rockers T’Pau was inspired by Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Incidentally, T’Pau took their band name from a Vulcan elder of the same name in the sci-fi series Star Trek.

Syndetics book coverThe master and Margarita / by Mikhail Bulgakov ; translated from the Russian by Mirra Ginsburg.
‘Sympathy for the Devil’ by The Rolling Stones was inspired by Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reportedly the book was given to Mick Jagger by Marianne Faithfull, with the song previously called ‘The Devil is My Name’ and ‘Fallen Angels’ in earlier versions.

Syndetics book coverSelected poems / Robert Burns ; edited by Carol McGuirk.
‘One Brown Mouse’ by Jethro Tull was inspired by the poem ‘To A Mouse’ by Robert Burns. ‘One Brown Mouse’ appeared on Blackpool rock band Jethro Tull’s Heavy Horses album.

Syndetics book coverThe hitchhiker’s guide to the galaxy : a trilogy in four parts / Douglas Adams.
‘Paranoid Android’, a darkly humorous single from Radiohead’s OK Computer, was inspired by The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. The android in question was Marvin, the original paranoid android.

Syndetics book coverThe Wizard of Oz / L. Frank Baum ; illustrated by David McKee.
‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road’ by Elton John was written by Elton John’s long-term song writer Bernie Taupin. Taupin said The Wizard of Oz was the first film he ever saw, and in the lyrics he wanted to reflect on his need to “get back to his roots”. It is regarded by many as one of Elton John’s finest songs.

Syndetics book coverThe essential Paradise lost / [abridged, compiled and with supplementary content by] John Carey.
‘Red Right Hand’ by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, from their 1994 album Let Love In, was inspired by Paradise Lost by Milton. The hand in question refers to the vengeful hand of God. The song has subsequently been much covered by the likes of by Iggy Pop, PJ Harvey, Jarvis Cocker, Arctic Monkeys and many others.

Syndetics book coverThe invisible man / by H.G. Wells ; adapted by Rick Geary.
‘The Invisible Man’ from the album The Miracle by Queen, was inspired by The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells, written by drummer Roger Taylor and credited to the band. It has the curious fact of being the only Queen song in which all the members of the band are mentioned by name in the track.

Celebrating Matariki 2018 at Wellington City Libraries

Matariki ahunga nui – Matariki, provider of plentiful food

As the month of June rolls upon us, marking the end of the traditional harvesting time, we pause for reflection as the constellation of Matariki will soon reappear in the sky to mark the start of the Māori New Year – a time for remembering the past, reflecting on the present, and gathering hopes for new beginnings. At Wellington Central Library we have organised the following free events and promotions to mark and celebrate Matariki.

            • Emerging Winter Food Traditions
              Our first event is about food preservation and fermentation which fits so well with Matariki as the time following harvest.
            • An introduction to whakapapa research resources
              The next event is a look at resources for researching whakapapa and some examples of how these resources can be used, this again fits with the ideas of whānau coming together at Matariki.
            • He Taonga te Reo – What’s in a name?
              A presentation on the intricacies of naming places in today’s democratic society :  he kōrero by Neavin Broughton
            • #MatarikiMash
              In the lead up to Matariki we will also be running our twitter word play promotion “Matariki Mash” from 11 June where we invite you to play along by creating a story that uses the four selected Māori words for the day (don’t forget the hashtag #matarikimash).

                       Here are some more details about these events.

            • Monday 18 June
              Central Library – Ground Floor, 12.30 pm
              Emerging winter food traditions

              Matariki poster 1 - Emerging Winter Food Traditions

              For this korero we have invited Kelda Hains and Lois Daish who will engage in a structured conversation on themes that include the popular and trending topics of preservation and fermentation.

              Lois Daish is a well-known local writer of cook books and you can read about her influence on the Wellington hospitality scene here and her appointment to Life Membership of New Zealand Guild of Food Writers here and in a food blog here.

              Many of us carry a memory of her food column published by the New Zealand Listener and I’m sure there are many of us who have collected these recipes into folders and books that are now sitting alongside the cookbook collection at home. Luckily many of these recipes have also been gathered together in her cook book A Good Year – available at Wellington City Libraries and spanning her 23 years with the Listener.

              When Lois was presented her life membership award Lauraine Jacobs, described her as someone who “has always cooked and written with sincerity and simplicity and empowered people to cook well every day.”

              Lois was also a hands-on restauranter, with cafes at venues in Wellington from 1980s onwards. It was Lois who first gave our other presenter Kelda Hains her first opportunity to work in a restaurant, in her Brooklyn Bar and Grill in the 1990s. Since then, Kelda, in partnership with two others has spent 20 years at the Nikau Café, where she has honed her culinary skills and developed a deep fundamental belief in supporting local growers and their fresh produce to form a basic and essential basis for all her cooking. Her book Nikau Café is also available at Wellington City Libraries.

              Kelda and her business partners have expanded their business interest to a new café in Aro Street called Rita where the kaupapa of fresh produce is embodied in her set menu dining. Through her experiments with traditional bottling/preserving she has evolved a passion for preserving by fermentation: beginning with sauerkraut and expanding to kohlrabi, celeriac, Korean kimchi, chick peas and koji rice. While this topic is a little fearsome for some of us, during this presentation Kelda will demonstrate her fascination with this process and you can read more about her love of these processes here.

              Tuesday 19 June
              Central Library – Second Floor, 12.30 pm
              An introduction to whakapapa research resources

              Matariki poster 2 - Whakapapa

              Library staff will demonstrate the world of online and published resources that are available for whakapapa research at your public library.
              Nau mai, haere mai. Come, sample our Land Court Minute Book indexes and bound minute book volumes (Wellington, 20 volumes, or microfilms covering a wider geographic area), our in-house database of Māori births, deaths (1913-1961) and marriages (1911-1952), and hidden treasures through online access to NLNZ’s PapersPast, Te Ao Hou, AtoJsonline, Donald McLean letters, Maorilandonline, and many other sources.

              Friday 22 June
              Central Library – CYA area, 12.30 pm
              What’s in a name?


              Neavin will discuss processes and meanings behind the selection of Te Reo Māori names for Civic Square, a sea walkway, the city wards, and other prominent features of the city.
              It is exciting to peel back the layers of history of places and objects that our eyes flick over ever so casually, without our stopping to ask: the ‘what’ or the‘why’ -of the stories behind those names.

              Starting Monday 11 June
              Twitter wordplay with #MatarikiMash

              Matariki Mash
              We invite you to test your imagination and your skill with language and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for 4 weeks as part of the Matariki celebrations.

              How does Matariki Mash work? We’ll post up four te reo Māori kupu each Monday and Wednesday morning on Twitter (you can follow us at @wcl_library) and all you need to do is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

              Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea.

              New Zealand Book Council

Feast your eyes on our latest Photography books

Feast Your Eyes

Don’t you just love all the pretty colours? Allow our most recent photography books to highlight the beauty of the colours all around us. Look back on iconic images re-imagined with colour, or look closer at the beauty of your fruit and vegetables. Look through the lens and delve into lives of people on the street, in the past, in the deep south, or the arctic circle. Take a look at these exquisite photography books and see something you have never seen before.

Book Jacket for: Feast your eyesFeast your eyes / Wright, Brittany
“Inspired by the effortless beauty of her ingredients; fresh fruits, vegetables, and more, Wright created the Instagram hashtag #foodgradients to showcase the splendor of nature’s edible rainbows. Each exquisite, neatly ordered photograph is a pleasure to get lost in. With a sleek, minimalist design, Feast Your Eyes is a celebration of the earth’s bounty, a breath of fresh air, and an inspiration for everyone looking for joy in the simple things.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: Retrographic : history's most exciting images transformed into living colourRetrographic : history’s most exciting images transformed into living colour / Carroll, Michael D
“The the careful selection of striking images and dedicated colourization research, Retrographic  will take you on a visual tour of the distant past. Many of these moments are already burned into our collective memory through the power of photography as shared by people across the 190-year long age of the Image. And now, these visual time capsules are collected together for the first time and presented with living colour. (Book Jacket)

Book Jacket for: The street philosophy of Garry WinograndThe street philosophy of Garry Winogrand / Dyer, Geoff
“Modeled on John Szarkowski’s classic book Atget, The Street Philosophy of Garry Winogrand is a masterfully curated selection of one hundred photographs from the Winogrand archive at the Center for Creative Photography, with each image accompanied by an original essay. This inimitable combination of photographer and writer, images and text, itself offers what Dyer claims for Winogrand’s photography–an education in seeing.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: Wander love : lessons, tips and inspiration from a solo travellerWander love : lessons, tips and inspiration from a solo traveller / Daquinag, Aubrey
“Author Aubrey Daquinag is a travel blogger and photographer, most often found posting her adventures on her blog ‘The Love Assembly’ from all corners of the globe. Featuring her incredible photography that shows you a world where travel meets style, Wander Love is the perfect mix of style, substance and travel adventures to inspire your own.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: Real estate photography for everybodyReal estate photography for everybody / Castle, Ron
“In this book, Ron Castle introduces you to the skills you need to succeed in real estate photography. You’ll gain insight into some basics of the business, and you’ll learn what kind of equipment you’ll need to do the job. You’ll also learn  what not to photograph, how to produce strong compositions, and find suggestions for an efficient and effective post-processing workflow.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: Berenice Abbott : a life in photographyBerenice Abbott : a life in photography / Van Haaften, Julia
“Abbott’s 60-year career established her not only as a master of American photography but also as a teacher, writer, archivist, and inventor. A teenage rebel from Ohio, Abbott escaped to Paris before returning to New York as the Roaring Twenties ended. Turning later to science, culminating in work important to America’s 1950s “space race”. This biography secures Abbott’s place in the histories of photography and modern art while framing her accomplishments as a female artist and entrepreneur.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: I am InuitI am Inuit / Adams, Brian
“For around four million people, the Arctic region is neither a curiosity, nor is it untouched wilderness: It is home. Since 2015, photographer Brian Adams has been traveling through Alaska, capturing the Inuit and their individual stories. This project has the aim of promoting understanding, dismantling stereotypes as well as misperceptions and connecting the world with Alaskan Inuits, and the Arctic, through common humanity.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: Sally Mann : a thousand crossingsSally Mann : a thousand crossings
“Using her deep love of her homeland (Virginia) and her knowledge of its historically fraught heritage, she asks powerful, provocative questions about history, identity, race, and religion-that reverberate across geographic and national boundaries. Organized into family, landscape, battlefields, legacy, and mortality-and including many works not previously exhibited or published, this is a sweeping overview of Mann’s artistic achievement of the past four decades.” (Catalogue)

Book Jacket for: 1968 : a revolutionary year in photographs1968 : a revolutionary year in photographs
“1968 has gone down in history as the year of social and political movements, of global protests against the existing social model. Tens of thousands marched the streets, calling for an end to war and oppression. There were space missions and epochal murders, while Hippie culture and the Beat Generation ran wild and the wave of pacifism conquered the theater. This book presents images which best represent 1968 in every context. The talent of the best photographers of the time, retraces and recounts this fateful year, so full of major events.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Book Jacket for: Flora magnifica : the art of flowers in four seasonsFlora magnifica : the art of flowers in four seasons / Azuma, Makoto
“This sumptuous book is the product of a longstanding collaboration between renowned flower artist Makoto Azuma and botanical photographer Shunsuke Shiinoki. The result is a series of dense, luxuriant images, rich in colour and texture, in which nature and artifice are skilfully mingled. The four chapters are themed according to the cycle of the seasons: the freshness of spring, the exuberance of summer, the fading grandeur of autumn and the deepening shadows of winter.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Snuggle up with these new DVDs on cold days

Borg vs. McEnroe

New DVDs include the return of Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan for another trip, this time to Spain; the Borg/McEnroe tennis rivalry which came to a head during the 1980 Wimbledon final; LGBT dramas Call Me By Your Name and God’s Own Country; the inspiring and heartwarming story of August Pullman in Wonder; and the acclaimed TV adaptation of the Margaret Atwood novel The Handmaid’s Tale.

The trip to Spain : the 6-part series.
“From acclaimed director Michael Winterbottom comes the follow up to the BAFTA winning first series The Trip and The Trip to Italy. Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan are back. Six meals in six different places on a road trip through Spain from the North Atlantic to the Mediterranean coast, visiting Cantabria, the Basque region, Aragon, Rioja, Castile La Mancha and ending in Andalucia. Included are all six episodes from the Sky television series with a full course of deleted scenes.” (Syndetics summary)

Borg vs McEnroe.
“Borg/McEnroe tells the story of the epic rivalry between Swedish tennis legend Bjorn Borg and his greatest adversary, the brash American John McEnroe, which came to a head during the 1980 Wimbledon Championships.” (Syndetics summary)

Les hommes de l’ombre. Season 3.
“Six months before the Presidential elections, the leader of the extreme right party who is ahead in the opinion polls, is assassinated before the eyes of Simon Kapita, President Marjories closest advisor. This attack creates disruption in the political spectrum and presages a bloody race for the Elyse. Throughout the final months of his Presidency, both right and left wing parties are involved in political manoeuvring, backstabbing and betrayals, while in his private life, his relationship with Elisabeth is tearing apart and becomes the target of the tabloids. For Simon Kapita, this last campaign becomes the one of all dangers..” (Syndetics summary)

Call me by your name.
“It’s the summer of 1983 in Italy, and Elio, a precocious 17-year-old, spends his days in his family’s villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading and flirting with his friend Marzia. One day, Oliver, a charming American scholar arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio’s father, an eminent professor. Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever.” (Syndetics summary)

God’s own country.
“Spring. Yorkshire. Young farmer Johnny Saxby numbs his daily frustrations with binge drinking and casual sex, until the arrival of a Romanian migrant worker for lambing season ignites an intense relationship that sets Johnny on a new path.” (Syndetics summary)

Only the brave.
“Only the Brave, based on the true story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots, is the heroic story of one unit of local firefighters that through hope, determination, sacrifice, and the drive to protect families, communities, and our country become one of the most elite firefighting teams in the country. As most of us run from danger, they run toward it–they watch over our lives, our homes, everything we hold dear, as they forge a unique brotherhood that comes into focus with one fateful fire.” (Mightyape.co.nz)

Wonder.
“Based on the New York Times bestseller, WONDER tells the inspiring and heartwarming story of August Pullman. Born with facial differences that, up until now, have prevented him from going to a mainstream school, Auggie becomes the most unlikely of heroes when he enters the local fifth grade. As his family, his new classmates, and the larger community all struggle to find their compassion and acceptance, Auggie’s extra­ordinary journey will unite them all and prove you can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.” (Mightyape.co.nz)

Peaky Blinders. Season four.
“Thomas Shelby heads up one of Birmingham’s most feared criminal organisations. But when he sees an opportunity to move up in the world, it becomes clear that his ambition knows no bounds.” (Syndetics summary)

The handmaid’s tale. Season one.
“A religion-based autocracy has taken over most of the United States, renaming the country Gilead. In this country women are second-class citizens. Anyone trying to escape is punished. One such person is June, who is captured while trying to escape with her husband and child and is sentenced to be a handmaid, bearing children for childless government officials. As a handmaid, June is renamed Offred.” (Syndetics summary)

Star Wars. The last Jedi.
“The Skywalker saga continues as the heroes of The Force Awakens join the galactic legends in an epic adventure. Having taken her first steps into the Jedi world, Rey joins Luke Skywalker on an adventure with Leia, Finn and Poe that unlocks mysteries of the Force and secrets of the past.” (Syndetics summary)

The killing of a sacred deer.
“Dr. Steven Murphy (Colin Farrell) is a renowned cardiovascular surgeon presiding over a spotless household with his ophthalmologist wife Anna (Nicole Kidman) and their two exemplary children, 12-year-old Bob (Sunny Suljic) and 14-year-old Kim (Raffey Cassidy). Lurking at the margins of his idyllic suburban existence is Martin (Barry Keoghan), a fatherless teen who Steven has covertly taken under his wing. As Martin begins insinuating himself into the family’s life in ever-more unsettling displays, the full scope of his intent becomes menacingly clear when he confronts Steven with a long-forgotten transgression that will shatter the Murphy family’s domes­tic bliss.” (Mightyape.co.nz)