Want to make a movie? Check out these new books about film!

Making Your Own Movie book cover

If you are interested in making a movie, check the fantastic, easy-peasy guidebooks; Making Your Own Movie and Moviemaking With Your iPhone. A variety of new books have been added to our collection on movies/TV programmes including the insightful history of Peter Jackson’s two trilogies; The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, and Nobody’s Girl Friday which is the first study of the successful women in Hollywood’s golden age. Check them out!

Syndetics book coverThe Little White Lies guide to making your own movie in 39 steps / Matt Thrift.
“This book cuts away the jargon to offer a highly accessible, no-fuss guide to getting the best results from the kit you already own. In just 39 steps, it offers essential instructions and tips to help amateur movie-makers–filming anything from family celebrations to no-budget horror movies–make their creations look and feel more cinematic. Drawing on its vast network of professional filmmakers as well as on its unique style (with a compelling illustration language and direct, quotation-rich approach), Little White Lies presents the definitive, fun, and straightforward handbook for making films.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMaking movies with your iPhone : shoot, edit, and share from anywhere / Ben Harvell.
Moviemaking With Your iPhone reveals the many features that transform the iPhone from a consumer device into a pro-quality video tool. From shooting documentary footage to full-blown short films, you can not only record video and still images with the iPhone, but edit and publish them from the device as well. This book is the ultimate guide to the best techniques, apps, and accessories that make professional movie creation a possibility using only the phone in your pocket.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)

Syndetics book coverAnything you can imagine : Peter Jackson and the making of Middle-Earth / Ian Nathan.
“The definitive history of Peter Jackson’s Middle-earth saga, Anything You Can Imagine takes us on a cinematic journey across all six films, featuring brand-new interviews with Peter, his cast & crew. From the early days of daring to dream it could be done, through the highs and lows of making the films, to fan adoration and, finally, Oscar glory. Enriched with brand-new interviews with Jackson, his fellow filmmakers and many of the films’ stars, Ian Nathan’s mesmerising narrative whisks us to Middle-earth, to gaze over the shoulder of the director as he creates the impossible, the unforgettable, and proves that film-making really is ‘anything you can imagine’.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCarrie Fisher & Debbie Reynolds : Princess Leia & Unsinkable Tammy in Hell / Darwin Porter & Danforth Prince.
“Were the greatest mother-daughter act in the history of show business. Each became a world-class symbol of the social and cinematic tastes that prevailed during their heydays in Hollywood. Now, for the first time, fans of Princess Leia and Unsinkable Tammy can read about the combative but ferociously loyal relationship of the “boop-boopa-doop” girl with her inter-galactic daughter, and the iron-willed strength each of them demonstrated during their battles to survive.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverNobody’s girl Friday : the women who ran Hollywood / J.E. Smyth.
“The first comprehensive history of Hollywood’s high-flying career women during the studio era, Nobody’s Girl Friday covers the impact of the executives, producers, editors, writers, agents, designers, directors, and actresses who shaped Hollywood film production and style, led their unions, climbed to the top during the war, and fought the blacklist. Based on a decade of archival research, author J.E. Smyth uncovers a formidable generation working within the American film industry and brings their voices back into the history of Hollywood.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSex and the city and us : how four single women changed the way we think, live, and love / Jennifer Keishin Armstrong.
“By the bestselling author of Seinfeldia, a fascinating retrospective of the iconic and award-winning television series, Sex and the City, to coincide with the show’s twentieth anniversary. Featuring exclusive new interviews with the cast and writers, including star Sarah Jessica Parker, creator Darren Star, executive producer Michael Patrick King, and author Candace Bushnell, Sex and the City and Us brings us a both a critical and nostalgic, behind-the-scenes look at a television series that changed the way women see themselves.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHistorians on Hamilton : how a blockbuster musical is restaging America’s past / edited by Renee C. Romano and Claire Bond Potter.
“America has gone Hamilton crazy. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Tony-winning musical has spawned sold-out performances, a triple platinum cast album, and a score so catchy that it is being used to teach U.S. history in classrooms across the country. But just how historically accurate is Hamilton? And how is the show itself making history? Historians on Hamilton brings together a collection of top scholars to explain the Hamilton phenomenon and explore what it might mean for our understanding of America’s history.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHooked on Hollywood : discoveries from a lifetime of film fandom / Leonard Maltin.
“Leonard Maltin is America’s best-known film historian, film reviewer, and author of books that have sold more than 7 million copies. He remains a thought leader on past and present Hollywood through his website www.leonardmaltin.com, and a social media presence that includes an active Facebook page and a Twitter feed with more than 66,000 followers. In Hooked on Hollywood , Maltin opens up his personal archive to take readers on a fascinating journey through film history. Leonard Maltin’s love of movies and vast knowledge about their history shines through from the first page to the last in this unique volume, which includes 150 rare photos and a comprehensive index.” (Syndetics summary)

New Graphic novels

Hasib book cover

Wellington City Libraries has a wealth of graphic novels for the edification and delight of Wellingtonians.  This month has seen some new voices added to the collection and some great compilations of seasoned artists and writers. British comic artist Shaky Kane has compiled all the Deadline strips and the Hoey siblings Coin-Op anthology has amassed twenty years of work. There are translated works, new episodes in long running series and original takes on conventional heroes as with DC’s Young Animal: Milk wars reworking Superman, Batman and Wonderwoman into a freaky Happy Days-esque version of “reality”.  The same trippy feel is echoed in Ice Cream Man: Rainbow sprinkles.

Film has a stylistic treatment in the form of Lawrence Block’s Eight million ways to die. Lawrence Block was so pleased with Snyder’s version he heaped praise on this artistic interpretation of his novel. Other artistic endeavors are explored in a translated Guardians of the Louvre. The classic Thousand and One Nights is also reprised with Hâsib and the Queen of Serpents. The sketchy world of Farel Dalrymple reveals an interlinking quest for some questionable characters in It Will All Hurt. And explore geography with Olivia Burton, as travel becomes an internal journey, beautifully laid out in her exploration of Algeria.

Delve into the newly acquired graphic novels at your library, with some choice selections below.

Hâsib & the queen of serpents : a tale of a thousand and one nights / B., David
“Heir to the wise Daniel, Hâsib is a young woodcutter promised to a great future. When his greedy companions abandon him in the middle of the forest, he meets the Queen of Serpents. She then tells her story, a fabulous adventure filled with gods and demons, princes and prophets. From Kabul to Cairo, journeys intertwine with intrigues and spiritual quests while the fabulous nights follow one another.” (Catalogue)

Redlands. Volume one, Sisters by blood / Bellaire, Jordie
“A mysterious coven of witches runs the town of Redlands, Florida–and in order to stay on top, sacrifices must be made. When possession turns into friendship, and when love evolves into spite, the witches’ reign is challenged.” (Catalogue)

Algeria is beautiful like America / Burton, Olivia
“Olivia had always heard stories about Algeria from her maternal grandmother, a Black Foot (a “Pied-Noir,” the French term for Christian and Jewish settlers of French Algeria who emigrated to France after the Algerian War of Independence). After her grandmother’s death, Olivia found some of her grandmother’s journals and letters describing her homeland. Now, ten years later, she resolves to travel to Algeria and experience the country for herself; she arrives alone, with her grandmother’s postcards and letters in tow, and a single phone number in her pocket of an Algerian, Djaffar, who will act as her guide.” (Catalogue)

Chainmail bikini : the anthology of women gamers
Chainmail Bikini is an anthology of comics by and about female gamers! Forty cartoonists have contributed comics about the games they’re passionate about — from video games to tabletop role-playing to collectible card games. The comics in Chainmail Bikini explore the real-life impact of entering a fantasy world, and how games can connect us with each other and teach us about ourselves. Alliances are forged, dice get rolled, and dragons get slain! Chainmail Bikini shows that while women are not always the target market for gaming, they are a vital and thoroughly engaged part of it, and are eager to express their personal take as players, makers, and critics of games.” (Catalogue)

It will all hurt / Dalrymple, Farel
“A weird, sad, silly, sketchy, and dreamy watercolor fantasy action quest in which Alemendra Clementine and her crew of anti-social adventurers all come together on a psych-apocalyptic world to take down an evil wizard.” (Catalogue)

Coin-Op comics anthology 1997-2017 / Hoey, Maria
“This first-ever collection by the award-winning team of siblings Peter and Maria Hoey encompasses the very best of their inventive and mysterious comics. The compilation ranges from the Hoeys’ early comics in Blab! Magazine to their groundbreaking newest series, Coin-Op. All in all, it’s more than twenty short stories and vignettes about music and film, the comic and the absurd, the past and the future all sparkling with innovative storytelling and design.” (Catalogue)

Good news bible : the complete Deadline strips of Shaky Kane. / Kane, Shaky
“This major retrospective of comics and illustration from essential British cartoonist Shaky Kane collects the entirety of his work from the classic ’90s magazine Deadline for the first time. Heavily influenced by the great Jack Kirby, Shaky produces comics that combine intensity and bombast with a psychedelic and unmistakably British cynicism.” (Catalogue)

DC/Young Animal : milk wars / Orlando, Steve
“What happens when the Doom Patrol team of misfits meets Justice League of America, or the new Gotham vigilante Mother Panic comes face to face with Batman? Will Shade the Changing Girl be able to appease Wonder Woman and will Cave Carson be able to team up with Swamp Thing to destroy the evil, interdimensional corporation called RetCo from the inside? Valid questions. Very valid. How will we ever find out the answer? Right here in DC/Young Animal: Milk Wars, of course!” (Catalogue)

Ice Cream Man. Volume one, Rainbow sprinkles / Prince, W. Maxwell
Ice Cream Man is a genre-defying comic book series, featuring disparate one-shot tales of sorrow, wonder, and redemption. Each installment features its own cast of strange characters, dealing with their own special sundae of suffering. And on the periphery of all of them, like the twinkly music of his colorful truck, is the Ice Cream Man–a weaver of stories, a purveyor of sweet treats. Friend. Foe. God. Demon. The man who with a snap of his fingers–lickety split!–can change the course of your life.” (Catalogue)

Lawrence Block’s Eight million ways to die / Snyder, John K.
“In crime-ravaged 1980s New York, a troubled ex-cop turned unlicensed detective takes on his most dangerous case, hunting down a serial killer-hitman, and ultimately coming face-to-face with his deadliest enemy, himself. The highly detailed, full-color artwork from John K. Snyder III perfectly complements the noir aesthetic of Block’s writing, making this a must have for fans of crime fiction, both in prose and graphic novel form.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Guardians of the Louvre / Taniguchi, Jirō
“After a group trip to Europe, a Japanese artist stops in Paris alone, intent on visiting the museums of the capital. But, bedridden in his hotel room with fever, he faces the absolute solitude of one suffering in a foreign land, deprived of any immediate or familiar recourse. When the fever breaks somewhat, he sets out on his visit and promptly gets lost in the crowded halls of the Louvre. Very soon, he discovers many unsuspected facets to this world in a museum in a journey oscillating between feverish hallucination and reality, actually able to speak with famous painters from various periods of history, led to crossroads between human and personal history by… the Guardians of the Louvre.” (Catalogue)

Nutritional news: Recent Health books

The Wellness Rebel book cover

This month we recommend you check out these recent additions to our non-fiction health collection. From medical myths, natural remedies to healthy food guides, you will definitely find your next read in this list below. Happy reading and happy guts!

Hype : a doctor’s guide to medical myths, exaggerated claims and bad advice – how to tell what’s real and what’s not / Shapiro, Nina L.
“There is a lot of misinformation thrown around these days, especially online. Headlines tell us to do this, not that–all in the name of living longer, better, thinner, younger. In Hype, Dr. Nina Shapiro distinguishes between the falsehoods and the evidence-backed truth. This book is as much for single individuals in the prime of their lives as it is for parents with young children and the elderly.” (Catalogue)

Food pharmacy : a guide to gut bacteria, anti-inflammatory foods, and eating for health : a prescription diet you will never overdose on / Aurell, Lina Nertby
Food Pharmacy tells the complete story of friendly bacteria, intestinal flora, anti-inflammatory superfoods like turmeric, the difference between good and bad fats, and how we can reduce inflammation and heal chronic diseases by regulating our immune system with the right natural foods. Marrying scientific research with seventeen supplementary recipes, practical advice, and a quirky voice, Food Pharmacy extols the kitchen’s anti-inflammatory heroes–like avocado, cloves, kale, cinnamon, and green bananas–and shows you how to live your healthiest life equipped with the right knowledge and food.” (Catalogue)

Herbal remedies handbook : more than 140 plant profiles : remedies for over 50 common conditions / Chevallier, Andrew
“Dr. Andrew Chevallier brings his knowledge and practical expertise in herbal medicine to ordinary people looking for safe, effective treatments for common ailments. Enhancing health and well-being. Herbal Remedies Handbook gives as much weight to the steps needed for individuals to correctly diagnose and treat themselves as to the 66 key remedies described, and their therapeutic uses. For ease of reference, the self-help section is arranged by ailments grouped according to the part of the person to be treated.” (Catalogue)

The wellness rebel / Plantbased Pixie
“The complete guide to sorting nutrition fact from fiction using evidence-based science and delicious recipes. The Wellness Rebel explores the basics of nutrition in an accessible and entertaining way, with Pixie sharing her tips, tricks and tastiest recipes – including her much-loved Pixie Plates – for a truly healthy diet, with no detoxes, no elimination diets, no restrictions – and absolutely no BS.” (Catalogue)

Brain food : how to eat smart and sharpen your mind / Mosconi, Lisa
“We are what we eat’ is an age-old adage. But while we often talk about diets affecting our fitness, we don’t talk about how what we eat and drink affects the health of the hungriest organ in the body – our brain. Innovative and timely, and with accompanying recipes and guides to show each of us how we can most effectively change our diets, Brain Food demonstrates how being smart about our diet can make us smarter overall.” (Catalogue)

What am I supposed to eat? : making sense of food confusion / Weaver, Libby
“For so many people today, food is complicated. They’re told to make `healthy’ choices yet this could include anything from an apple to a packet of sugar-free biscuits. They have lost touch with how much to eat, how often and how their food choices are impacting on their health – and then there are those all-consuming moments when they feel like no amount of food could satisfy their hungry hearts. This book is a fork in the road when it comes to better understanding your food, your body, your appetite and what you are supposed to eat.” (Catalogue)

New contemporary fiction additions

Asymmetry book cover

The new additions to Wellington City Libraries general fiction collection has a breadth and depth spanning genres, authors and due to some classic reprints, time as well.  New writers have hit the ground running with popular titles such as Bearskin from James McLaughlin and the lauded Asymmetry from Lisa Halliday. The confident voice of Caitlin Moran explores youthful exuberance and gender justice in a very 90’s How To Be Famous.

Translated tales feature Finnish author Philip Teir, Sjón from Iceland with the new title CoDex 1962, and The Penguin Book of Japanese Short Stories showcases a variety of authors including work from Banana Yoshimoto and Yuko Tsushima. Te Whanga-nui-a-Tara/Wellington author Isa Pearl Ritchie’s family novel brings contemporary issues and familiar locations to life. Thrillers, human drama in the inter-war period and a quirky look at humans beholden to a hibernation pattern round out the selection from this month.

Bearskin / McLaughlin, James A
Bearskin is visceral, raw, and compelling-filled with sights, smells, and sounds truly observed. James McLaughlin expertly brings the beauty and danger of Appalachia to life. The result is an elemental, slow burn of a novel–one that will haunt you long after you turn the final page.
Rice Moore is just beginning to think his troubles are behind him. He’s found a job protecting a remote forest preserve in Virginian Appalachia where his main responsibilities include tracking wildlife and refurbishing cabins. But when Rice finds the carcass of a bear killed on the grounds, the quiet solitude he’s so desperately sought is suddenly at risk. More bears are killed on the preserve and Rice’s obsession with catching the poachers escalates.” (Catalogue)

Asymmetry / Halliday, Lisa
“Told in three distinct and uniquely compelling sections, Asymmetry explores the imbalances that spark and sustain many of our most dramatic human relations: inequities in age, power, talent, wealth, fame, geography, and justice. A stunning debut from a rising literary star, Asymmetry is an urgent, important, and truly original work that will captivate any reader while also posing arresting questions about the very nature of fiction itself. A debut novel about love, luck, and the inextricability of life and art.”(Catalogue)

All the lives we never lived / Roy, Anuradha
“In my childhood, I was known as the boy whose mother had run off with an Englishman.”  What took Myshkin’s mother from India to Dutch-held Bali in the 1930s, ripping a knife through his comfortingly familiar environment? Excavating the roots of the world in which he was abandoned, Myshkin comes to understand the connections between anguish at home and a war-torn universe overtaken by patriotism. Anuradha Roy’s enthralling novel is a powerful parable for our times, telling the story of men and women trapped in a dangerous era uncannily similar to the present. Impassioned, elegiac, and gripping, it brims with the same genius that has brought Roy’s earlier fiction international renown.” (Catalogue)

How to be famous / Moran, Caitlin
“I’m Johanna Morrigan, and I live in London in 1995, at the epicentre of Britpop. I might only be nineteen, but I’m wise enough to know that everyone around me is handling fame very, very badly. My unrequited love, John Kite, has scored an unexpected Number One album, then exploded into a Booze And Drugs Hell™️ – as rockstars do. And my new best friend – the maverick feminist Suzanne Banks, of The Branks – has amazing hair, but writer’s block and a rampant pill problem. So I’ve decided I should become a Fame Doctor. I’m going to use my new monthly column for The Face to write about every ridiculous, surreal, amazing aspect of a million people knowing your name.” (Catalogue)

The summer house / Teir, Philip
“The light greenery of the early summer is trembling around Erik and Julia as they shove their children into the car and start the drive towards the house by the sea on the west coast of Finland where they will spend the summer. The arrival of Julia’s childhood friend Marika – along with her charismatic husband Chris, the leader of a group of environmental activists that have given up hope for planet Earth… deepens the hairline cracks that had so far remained invisible. Around these people, over the course of one summer, Philip Teir weaves a finely-tuned story about life choices and lies, about childhood and adulthood. How do we live if we know that the world is about to end?” (Adapted from Catalogue)

CoDex 1962 / Sjón
“Taking refuge in a small-town as a Jewish fugitive in WWII, Leo discovers a young woman who nurses him back to health. Together they shape a piece of clay into a baby. Leo escapes to Iceland with the clay boy in a hatbox only to become embroiled in a murder mystery. It is not until 1962 that Jósef can be born. In modern-day ReykjavÍk, a middle-aged Jósef attracts the interest of a geneticist. Now what lies behind Josef’s tale emerges.” (Catalogue)

The Penguin book of Japanese short stories
This fantastically varied and exciting collection celebrates the art of the Japanese short story, from its origins in the nineteenth century to the remarkable practitioners writing today. Authors like Tanizaki, Akutagawa, Murakami, Mishima, Kawabata, and Yoshimoto, as well as many surprising new finds. From Yuko Tsushima’s ‘Flames’ to Banana Yoshimoto’s ‘Bee Honey.’ Edited by acclaimed translator Jay Rubin, who has himself freshly translated some of the stories, and with an introduction by Haruki Murakami, this book is a revelation.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Fishing for Māui / Ritchie, Isa Pearl
“A novel about food, whanau, and mental illness. Valerie reads George Eliot to get to sleep just to take her mind off worries over her patients, her children, their father and the next family dinner. Elena is so obsessed with health, traditional food, her pregnancy and her blog she doesn’t notice that her partner, Malcolm the ethicist, is getting himself into a moral dilemma of his own making. Evie wants to save the world one chicken at a time. Meanwhile her boyfriend, Michael is on a quest to reconnect with his Maori heritage and discover his own identity. Rosa is eight years old and lost in her own fantasy world, but shes the only one who can tell somethings not right. Crisis has the power to bring this family together, but will it be too late?” (Catalogue)

Early riser / Fforde, Jasper
“Imagine a world where all humans must hibernate through a brutally cold winter, their bodies dangerously close to death as they enter an ultra-low metabolic state of utterly dreamless sleep. All humans, that is, apart from the Winter Consuls, a group of officers who diligently watch over the vulnerable sleeping citizens. Charlie Worthing is a novice, chosen by a highflying hero Winter Consul to accompany him to the Douzey, a remote sector in the middle of Wales, to investigate a dream which is somehow spreading amongst those in the hibernational state, causing paranoia, hallucination and a psychotic episode that can end in murder. Worthing has been trained to deal with Tricksy Nightwalkers whose consciousness has been eroded by hibernation, leaving only one or two skills and an incredible hunger; he’s been trained to stay alive through the bleakest and loneliest of winters – but he is in no way prepared for what awaits him in Sector Twelve. There are no heroes in Winter, Worthing has been told. And he’s about to find out why…” (Catalogue)

Pieces of her / Slaughter, Karin
“The electrifying new thriller from international bestseller Karin Slaughter explores the deadly secrets kept between a mother and daughter. What if the person you thought you knew best turns out to be someone you never knew at all? Andrea Cooper’s mother, Laura, is the perfect small-town mum. It turns out that before Laura was Laura, she was someone completely different. For nearly thirty years she’s been hiding from her previous identity, lying low in the hope that no one would ever find her. But now she’s been exposed, and nothing will ever be the same again.” (Catalogue)

So much life left over / De Bernières, Louis
“From the acclaimed author of Corelli’s Mandolin: a powerfully evocative and emotional novel, set in the years between the two World Wars, about a closely-knit group of British men and women struggling to cope with the world–and the selves–left to them in the wake of World War I. They were inseparable childhood friends. Some were lost to the war. The others’ lives were unimaginably upended, and now, postwar, they’ve scattered: to Ceylon and India, France and Germany (and, inevitably, back to Britain)–each of them trying to answer the question that fuels this sweeping novel: “If you have been embroiled in a war… what were you supposed to do with so much life unexpectedly left over?” (Catalogue)

The Mars room : a novel / Kushner, Rachel
“It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.” (Catalogue)

Kia hiwa rā! New books in the Māori Collection

Ngā mihi o te kōanga. Spring has brought some outstanding new books to our Māori Collection including Tīmoti Karetu and Wharehuia Milroy’s new book He Kupu Tuku Iho: Ko te Reo Māori te Tatau ki te Ao. Written completely in te reo Māori, and with no accompanying English translation, He Kupu Tuku Iho is a treasure trove of concepts, culture, and language for fluent readers (or enthusiastic learners) of te reo rangatira.

Other new additions include Treasures of Tāne: Plants of Ngāi Tahu, a beautifully illustrated and informative book about native plants and their uses from a Ngāi Tahu perspective, and Conversations About Indigenous Rights, an exploration of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples and its impact on Aotearoa ten years on from its signing.

Syndetics book coverHe kupu tuku iho: ko te reo Māori te tatau ki te ao / Tīmoti Kāretu, Wharehuia Milroy.
“He pukapuka tēnei nā ēnei ruānuku matararahi mō ngā kaupapa mātuatua o te reo me ngā tikanga. Ko ētahi o ngā kaupapa ko te mana, te tapu, te wairua, te whakapapa, te kawanga whare, te poroporoaki, te kōrero paki, me ngā kaupapa o te reo me ngā tikanga o te ao hurihuri nei. Hei tauira ō rāua reo mō ngā ākonga me ngā kaikōrero ka whai mai. Nā te mahi ngātahi a Te Wharehuia rāua ko Tīmoti me tētahi rōpū o Te Ipukarea hei hopu i ngā kōrero, hei tuhituhi i aua kōrero, ka hua mai te pukapuka nei hei taonga mā ngā reanga o nāianei me āpōpō.” (Na te kaitā tēnei whakarāpopoto)

“Published completely in te reo Māori, this landmark book has chapters on key aspects of Māori language and culture and is authored by two of Aotearoa’s pre-eminent kaumātua, Tīmoti Kāretu and Wharehuia Milroy. The authors discuss key cultural concepts including mana, tapu, wairua, whakapapa, ritual, farewell speeches and Māori humour. Language and cultural issues of the modern world are also discussed. The language used is an exemplar for learners and speakers of te reo Māori.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Image from Huia PublishersTreasures of Tāne: plants of Ngāi Tahu / Tipa, Rob
“This is an accessible guide to native plants of the South Island, traditional Māori uses of them, their history, and traditions. The text describes the characteristic features, natural environment, and uses of each plant, listed alphabetically for quick reference. There are close-up shots of each plant, photographs of the plants in their habitats, and images of the fruit and flowers for easy identification. Written by a journalist, the guide is engaging, enlightening and user-friendly.” ( Adapted from publisher information)

Syndetics book coverConversations about indigenous rights: the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Selwyn Katene and Rawiri Taonui.
Conversations About Indigenous Rights provides an assessment of how New Zealand is meeting its obligations under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples, ten years on from its signing. It shows the strong alignment between the Treaty of Waitangi and the Declaration, and examines how the Declaration assists the interpretation and application of Treaty principles of partnership, protection and participation. Drawing on both scholarship and lived experience, Conversations About Indigenous Rights features chapters by Moana Jackson, Dame Naida Glavish, Sir Pita Sharples, Rawiri Taonui, Selwyn Katene, Sheryl Lightfoot, Steve Larkin, Anaru Erueti, Jessica Ngatai, Fleur Te Aho, Tracey Whare, Pushpa Wood and Jason Mika.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Global roaming: short stories / Blank, Anton
Global Roaming explores love, intimacy, and the inter-connectedness of the global village. Set in New Zealand, Asia, and Europe the short stories in this collection explore identities in crisis and the complex external forces that shape who we are. Author Anton Blank is a writer, publisher and social entrepreneur who lives in Auckland. He has an extensive history in Māori development and literature. He is the editor and publisher of New Zealand’s only Māori journal Ora Nui.” (Adapted from our catalogue)

Alternative : an international journal of indigenous peoples. Volume 14. Issue 2. 2018
The latest issue of AlterNative (a journal dedicated to scholarly research about, and from the perspective of, indigenous peoples) includes an interesting article titled Māori women leading local sustainable food systems (pages 147- 155). This article examines four community food initiatives in Aotearoa, what ‘food sovereignty’ means to Māori women, and the role women play within the four initiatives. The issue also includes eight other fascinating articles about indigenous peoples in the wider world.

Recent books on Cars & Transport

Ferrari Under the Skin book cover

They’re all there this time! Planes, trains, rocket ships, racing cars and ocean liners! There are even two volumes on the former trolleybuses of Wellington, featuring the now-retired trolley network.

Syndetics book coverFerrari : under the skin / Andrew Nahum, Martin Derrick.
“A substantial work, providing exceptional insights into Ferrari the man, Ferrari’s design, and Ferrari the legend. Ferrari is an extraordinary company that emerged as World War II receded in Italy, combining collegiality, an almost religious dedication, and dictatorship in equal parts. Above all, it was impelled by the remorseless ambition of its founder Enzo Ferrari. Richly illustrated with personal ephemera, technical drawings, master models, and luxurious product shots, this in-depth exploration of Ferrari – the man, company, cars, and clientele – reveals what goes into the making of, many would argue, the world’s most desirable car brand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRails toward the sky : the story of Driving Creek Railway / Barry Brickell.
“When Barry Brickell became New Zealand’s first full-time craft potter, he combined his passion for railways with a family tradition in engineering to build a short line bringing clay and firewood down from the hills to his kilns. Over the next thirty years he kept extending the line, always taking it just a little bit higher. Driving Creek Railway conquers grades steeper than the Rimutaka Incline, includes spirals and horseshoe curves like the Raurimu Spiral, has zig-zags like those in the Andes, and includes the world’s only double-decked railway viaduct.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverThe RAF at 100 : a century in photographs.
“The Royal Air Force was formed in 1918 to defend the skies over Britain during the First World War and made a major contribution to winning one of the largest and most devastating conflicts of the twentieth century. Yet, when the war ended, its existence as an independent air service came under threat from severe defence cuts and intense scrutiny from some quarters as to whether it was needed at all. The Second World War put paid to all the uncertainty and sealed the RAF’s place in the armed services. It has since played a vital role in many large-scale conflicts, as well as in peacekeeping and international aid operations.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Syndetics book coverMotocourse : the world’s leading grand prix & superbike annual / [editor, Michael Scott].
“For the 42nd year, this is the two-wheeled sport’s longest-running and most respected yearbook, featuring independent and authoritative editorial combined with the finest action photography. The World’s Leading Grand Prix and Superbike Annual is the indisputable leader in its field, covering the world of motorcycle racing like no other publication. Motocourse wraps up the year with the most complete results record supplied anywhere in a single volume. This lavish yearbook continues to be essential reading for all fans of two-wheeled motorcycle racing worldwide.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRocket men : the daring odyssey of Apollo 8 and the astronauts who made man’s first journey to the Moon / Robert Kurson.
“By August 1968, the American space program was in danger of failing in its two most important objectives: to land a man on the Moon by President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline, and to triumph over the Soviets in space. With its back against the wall, NASA made an almost unimaginable leap: It would scrap its usual methodical approach and risk everything on a sudden launch, sending the first men in history to the Moon–in just four months. And it would all happen at Christmas. In a year of historic violence and discord–the Tet Offensive, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert Kennedy, the riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago–the Apollo 8 mission would be the boldest, riskiest test of America’s greatness under pressure.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Syndetics book coverThe Orient Express : the history of the world’s most luxurious train 1883–present day / Anthony Burton.
“The Orient Express is a name synonymous with luxury train travel in Europe. In 1883, the first train with its gleaming livery and leather-embossed chairs in mahogany-panelled compartments caused a sensation. But by the 1950s and 1960s, the service was becoming ever shorter and European rail travel less stylish. However, in its prime, the Orient Express provided a much-needed luxury service that managed to cross borders and overcome national interests and rivalries. The Orient Express traces the history of the service, from its glamorous beginnings, its popularity with European royalty and heads of state, to its demise in the age of postwar austerity, the Cold War and cheaper air travel. Subsequently revived on a limited scale using some restored original train cars, the mythos of the Orient Express lives on.” (adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverChasing New Horizons : inside the epic first mission to Pluto / Alan Stern and David Grinspoon.
“On July 14, 2015, something amazing happened. More than 3 billion miles from Earth, a small NASA spacecraft called New Horizons screamed past Pluto at more than 32,000 miles per hour, focusing its instruments on the long mysterious icy worlds of the Pluto system, and then continued on its journey out into the beyond. Nothing like this has occurred in a generation–a raw exploration of new worlds unparalleled since NASA’s Voyager missions–and nothing like it is planned to happen again. Chasing New Horizons is the story of the men and women behind the mission: of their decades-long commitment; of the political fights within and outside of NASA; of the sheer human ingenuity it took to design, build, and fly the mission.” (adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe complete guide to drones : choose + build + photograph + race / Adam Juniper.
“Whether you’re flying indoors or out, buying or building, this book covers everything… Following the worldwide success of the first edition, which has been translated into numerous languages, this second edition is not only fully updated to keep pace with the laws and technology, but also extended to thoroughly cover the fast-growing new sport of FPV drone racing, while still including a comprehensive guide to learning to fly any drone.” (adapted from Syndetics summary)

Life on the road : Kiwi trucking stories
“Kiwi truckies are the unsung heroes of New Zealand – the men and women who make great personal sacrifice to keep our country running. The people who devote their life, in some way or another, to what is often a hard and lonely passion. Life on the Road… captures the humour, tragedy, action and extremes of the trucking world, moving between the dramatic, light-hearted and surprising – including runaway trucks, skirmishes with the law, nostalgic tales of the early pioneers, love stories, and more than one practical joke.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Ocean liners : an illustrated history / Newall, Peter
“Before the advent of the jet age, the ocean liner played a pivotal role in the transportation of people around the world. This illuminating book tells the story of the evolution of the liner from the humble paddle steamer to the beautiful, streamlined passenger ships of the latter half of the twentieth century. Now only a memory, they are here brought back to life in more than 250 evocative photographs, many never seen before.” (Book jacket)

Fly girls : how five daring women defied all odds and made aviation history / O’Brien, Keith
“The untold story of five women who fought to compete against men in the high-stakes national air races of the 1920s and 1930s — and won. Between the world wars, no sport was more popular, or more dangerous, than airplane racing. Thousands of fans flocked to multi-day events, and cities vied with one another to host them. The pilots themselves were hailed as dashing heroes who cheerfully stared death in the face. Well, the men were hailed…. Fly Girls recounts how a cadre of women banded together to break the original glass ceiling: the entrenched prejudice that conspired to keep them out of the sky.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Wellington’s Volvo trolleybus finale / Alan Wickens.
“This booklet recalls memories of the Volvo trolleybuses, particularly in their last year of operation in 2009. The introduction of their prototype replacements, and the new look Designline buses is included, together with scenes of the Volvo’s demise and scrapping.” (Catalogue)

Following the wires : trolleybuses of New Zealand / Sean Millar.
“Five New Zealand cities have had trolleybus systems: Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, New Plymouth and Wellington, of which only Wellington’s survives.” (Syndetics summary)

New DVDs in our collection

Plenty of great DVD choices this month from comedy gold, to cold war tensions, to true life stories and coming of age drama.

Detectorists. Series three.
“Having returned from Africa, Andy and Becky (Rachael Stirling) have moved in temporarily with her mother (Diana Rigg) with all the challenges that come with the territory. Lance is trying to kick-start his relationship with Toni (Rebecca Callard), but her living on a barge makes him queasy and his daughter staying at the flat leaves it all rather precarious with none of this being helped by the re-appearance of his ex-wife. Meanwhile Lance and Andy’s search for gold continues as they face enemies old and new. This delightful comedy continues to unearth the hidden depths of those who call themselves detectorists.” (Syndetics Summary)

Film stars don’t die in Liverpool
“Based on Peter Turner’s memoir, the film follows the playful but passionate relationship between Turner (Bell) and the eccentric Academy Award-winning actress Gloria Grahame (Bening) in 1978 Liverpool. What starts as a vibrant affair between a legendary femme fatale and her young lover quickly grows into a deeper relationship, with Turner being the person Gloria turns to for comfort. Their passion and lust for life is tested to the limits by events beyond their control.” (Mightyape.co.nz)

The mercy.
“The incredible true story of Donald Crowhurst (Colin Firth) an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping. With an unfinished boat and his business and house on the line, Donald leaves his wife, Clare (Rachel Weisz) and their children behind, hesitantly embarking on an adventure on his boat the Teignmouth Electron.” (Catalogue)

Game night
“A group of friends who meet regularly for game nights find themselves trying to solve a murder mystery.” (Catalogue)

Lady Bird
“Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson is a high school senior from the “wrong side of the tracks.” She longs for adventure, sophistication, and opportunity, but finds none of that in her Sacramento Catholic high school. Lady Bird follows the title character’s senior year in high school, including her first romance, her participation in the school play, and most importantly, her applying for college.” (Catalogue)

Vikings. Season 5, Volume 1
“This season is full of startling alliances and unbelievable betrayals as the Vikings fight to rule the world. Jonathan Rhys Meyers (The Tudors) joins the cast in season five as Bishop Heahmund along with series regulars Katheryn Winnick (Lagertha), Gustaf Skarsgård (Floki), Alexander Ludwig (Bjorn) and Alex Høgh Andersen (Ivar the Boneless).” (Mightyape.co.nz)

Ready player one
“Set in 2045, with the world on the brink of chaos and collapse, but the people have found salvation in the OASIS, an expansive virtual reality universe created by the brilliant and eccentric James Halliday (Mark Rylance). When Halliday dies, he leaves his immense fortune to the first person to find a digital Easter egg he has hidden somewhere in the OASIS, sparking a contest that grips the entire world. When an unlikely young hero named Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan) decides to join the contest, he is hurled into a breakneck, reality-bending treasure hunt through a fantastical universe of mystery, discovery and danger.” (Mightyape.co.nz)

The Americans. The complete fifth season.
“Danger, disillusionment, and betrayal reach an all-time high in the suspense-laced fifth season of The Americans. KGB agents Philip and Elizabeth Jennings’ unwavering dedication to their work comes at even more of a personal cost than before. And as Paige is drawn deeper into the reality of her parents’ secret job, she realizes she will never have a normal life. Meanwhile, as Cold War tensions continue to escalate, Philip and Elizabeth are suspicious of Stan’s new romance, and they become more acutely aware of the vast disparity between American abundance and Russian scarcity.” (Catalogue)

City of ghosts
“A documentary that follows the efforts of “Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently,” a handful of anonymous activists who banded together after their homeland was taken over by ISIS in 2014. With deeply personal access, this is the story of a brave group of citizen journalists as they face the realities of life undercover, on the run, and in exile, risking their lives to stand up against one of the greatest evils in the world today.” (Catalogue)

Album art and animal tracking: New design books

Truly Nordic book cover

We’ve had an excellent selection of new design books hitting our shelves recently, on topics such as graphic design, typography, information design, advertising, publication design and much more. Some highlights from our latest picks include infographic collections on pop music and the movements of animal wildlife, and a volume on the art of your favourite musical albums – we recommend checking out our vinyl collection to see some of these beauties in their full-sized glory. Enjoy!

Pop charts : 100 iconic songs lyrics visualized / McHugh, Katrina
“Test your musical knowledge with this fun compilation, filled with 100 beautifully designed infographics, that pays homage to the songs we can’t get out of our heads — inspired by lyrics from artists such as Madonna, Fleetwood Mac, Paul Simon, TLC, Bob Dylan, Weezer, and more. Featuring a minimalist and artful design, Pop Charts reinterprets lines from songs that have become part of the zeitgeist. Classics, earworms, and cult hits are reimagined with cool, playful infographic designs — from David Bowie’s Space Oddity to the Beastie Boys’ Sabotage and Beyoncé’s Run the World.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Album art : new music graphics / Foster, John
“We are in the middle of one of the greatest periods in music packaging. Collectible packaging is back at the cultural vanguard: physical records are coveted by millennials, and hip clothing outlets devote massive amounts of space to record players and racks of LPs. Album Art profiles thirty-three designers at the forefront of this movement, among them Braulio Amado, Chris Bigg, Brian Roettinger and Jonathan Barnbrook. They reveal and analyse the creative process behind each design, offering exclusive insights into how they are able to elevate the simple record cover into something more, something special, something unique, something memorable.” (Catalogue)

The story of The Face : the magazine that changed culture / Gorman, Paul
“Launched by NME editor and Smash Hits creator Nick Logan in 1980, The Face became an icon of “style culture,” the benchmark for the latest trends in art, design, fashion, photography, film, and music being defined by a thriving youth culture. The Story of The Face tracks the exciting highs and calamitous lows of the life of the magazine. The Story of The Face is an engaging behind-the-scenes look at the rise and fall of one of the 80s and 90s’ most influential music and style publications.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Truly Nordic : Nordic craftsmanship, branding campaigns and design.
“Nordic design exhibits a philosophy that’s characterised by efficiency, clean lines and a simple and cheerful palette. History and culture have been the fundamental premise of their aesthetic approach, imbued with a respectful attitude towards nature visible in their material choices and graphic expressions. Truly Nordic explores contemporary design emerging from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Characters : cultural stories revealed through typography / Banham, Stephen
“Type and signage surround us. They are part of our daily lives and the history of whichever city we happen to live in. Whether old or new, each sign has a story to tell. In Characters, Stephen Banham has meticulously researched the signage and typography of a city to present an exuberant collection of quirky, poignant and often funny stories. From architecture and advertising to cultural history and much more, Characters is a book that will appeal to historians, designers and typophiles alike.” (Syndetics summary)

The history of graphic design
“This book offers a comprehensive history of graphic design from the end of the 19th century to the remains of World War II. It traces the evolution of this creative field from its beginning as poster design to its further development into advertising, corporate identity, packaging, and editorial design. Organized chronologically, the volume features over 2,500 seminal designs from all over the world.” (Syndetics summary)

Where the animals go : tracking wildlife with technology in 50 maps and graphics / Cheshire, James
“For thousands of years, tracking animals meant following footprints. Now satellites, drones, camera traps, cellphone networks, and accelerometers reveal the natural world as never before. Where the Animals Go is the first book to offer a comprehensive, data-driven portrait of how creatures like ants, otters, owls, turtles, and sharks navigate the world. Based on pioneering research by scientists at the forefront of the animal-tracking revolution, James Cheshire and Oliver Uberti’s stunning, four-color charts and maps tell fascinating stories of animal behavior.” (Catalogue)

Postmodern design complete / Gura, Judith
“Originating as a rebellious movement in philosophy and literature, Postmodernism proclaimed the death of modernism and promoted a new, nonlinear way of approaching architecture and design, spearheaded by Michael Graves, Robert Venturi, Ettore Sottsass, and Alessandro Mendini. It became a style in itself and the defining look of the 1980s. Postmodern Design Complete is the comprehensive reference to this period of vibrant design, as it profiles key creators including Graves, Mendini, Sottsass, Venturi, Charles Jencks, and Denise Scott Brown and covers the fields of architecture, furniture, graphic design, textiles, and product and industrial design.” (Catalogue)

New Classical CDs

Aimi Kobayashi album cover

Today’s selection of new classical music CDs features a couple of compilations of religious choral music book-ending three centuries, from Vivaldi and Vaughan Williams. We have also added our first recording from Aimi Kobayashi, a successful young pianist and Chopin-expert.

Gloria, Vivaldi. Performed by Julia Lezhneva, Franco Fagioli with Coro Della Radiotelevisione Svizzera.
“The brightest stars of Italian baroque combine in a dream team for Vivaldi’s ever-popular Gloria in D major. Julia Lezhneva’s ‘serene, sleek voice’ (The Financial Times) is also heard in the sacred motet Nulla in mundo pax sincera, while Franco Fagioli’s ‘distinctive and almost feminine sound’ (The Guardian) is perfectly matched to Vivaldi’s psalm setting Nisi Dominus with its haunting ‘Cum dederit’.” (cover)

Solo Piano, Chopin, Liszt. Performed by Aimi Kobayashi.
“A teenage gold medallist in both the Asia-Pacific and ASIA International Chopin competitions, and a finalist in the ultimate Chopin Competition in Warsaw 2015, just past her 20th birthday, young virtuoso Aimi Kobayashi has enjoyed a close relationship with the music of the Polish composer throughout her skyrocketing career. Here she pairs the great Second Sonata with dazzling works by Chopin’s contemporary and friend Franz Liszt on a programme showcasing the musicianship she would share with the world…” (cover)

Mass in G Minor, Vaughan Williams. Performed by The Choir of St John’s, Cambridge.
Marking the centenary of the 1918 Armistice is this recording of Vaughan Williams choral works performed by The Choir of St John’s with Andrew Nethsingha at the helm. Many of these works were composed shortly after the end of the First World War, perhaps in response to the composer’s experience.

Translated works of fiction new to Wellington City Libraries

Convenience Store Woman book cover

Voices from other cultures give us new windows to view the world through.  This month features a variety of contemporary fiction and a revealing translation from WWII. Anna Seghers’ The Seventh Cross written in 1942 tells the tale of concentration camp escapees and their encounters with citizens of the time.  Recently translated, this novel lends immediacy to the issues faced by those living in a totalitarian regime. Other tiles feature weird twists of imagination and how to live with, or in spite of the expectations of everyday society. Some great reads to edify and entertain through the winter evenings.

I always find you / Ajvide Lindqvist, John
“In September 1985, nineteen-year-old John Lindqvist moved into a dilapidated old building in Stockholm, planning to make his living as a magician. Something strange was going on in the locked shower room in the building’s basement–and the price of entry was just a little blood. I Always Find You is a horror story–as bizarre and macabre as any of Lindqvist’s earlier novels–but it’s also a melancholy meditation on being young and lonely, on making friends and growing up. It’s about magic, and the intensity of human connection–and the evil we carry inside.” (Catalogue)

Acts of infidelity / Andersson, Lena
“When Ester Nilsson meets the actor Olof Sten, she falls madly in love. Olof makes no secret of being married, but he and Ester nevertheless start to meet regularly and begin to conduct a strange dance of courtship. Ester, on the other hand, is convinced that things might change. To read Acts of Infidelity is to dive inside the mind of a brilliant, infuriating friend – Ester’s and Olof’s entanglements and arguments are the stuff of relationship nightmares. Cutting, often cruel, and written with razor-sharp humour, Acts of Infidelity is clever, painful, maddening, but most of all perfectly, precisely true.” (Catalogue)

Your second life begins when you realize you only have one / Giordano, Raphaëlle
“Nonfiction author Giordano makes her fiction debut with a go-find-yourself title that was a blockbuster best seller in her native France, with rights sold to 31 territories. In her late thirties and content with husband, job, and motherhood, Paris native Camille still nevertheless feels she’s missed her chance at happiness. Here’s how she finds it. A charming, feel-good, and universal story of one woman’s journey from boredom and dissatisfaction to happiness and fulfilment.” (Catalogue)

Convenience store woman / Murata, Sayaka
“Keiko isn’t normal. At school and university people find her odd, and her family worries she will never fit in. To make them happy, she takes a job at a convenience store. But in Keiko’s circle it just won’t do for an unmarried woman to spend her time stacking shelves and ordering green tea. As the pressure to find a new job – or worse, a husband – increases, Keiko is forced to take desperate action…” (Catalogue)

Woman at sea / Poulain, Catherine
“Lili is a runaway. She’s left behind a humdrum existence in France to go in search of freedom, of adventure, of life. Her search takes her to the island of Kodiak, Alaska, home to a rag-tag community of fishermen, army vets and drifters who man the island’s boats and trawlers. Despite her tiny frame, faltering English and total lack of experience, when the fishing season begins Lili lands a job on board the Rebel – one of the toughest gigs in town. Lili is tough and determined … she has nothing to lose after all, and at sea she finally finds the intensity of life she’s been looking for.” (Catalogue)

The seventh cross / Seghers, Anna
“A revelatory World War II novel about a German prisoner of war fleeing for the border and encountering a variety of Germans, good and bad and indifferent, along his way. Seven political prisoners escape from a Nazi prison camp; in response, the camp commandant has seven trees harshly pruned to resemble seven crosses: they will serve as posts to torture each recaptured prisoner, and capture, of course, is certain. Anna Seghers’s novel is not only a supremely suspenseful story of flight and pursuit but also a detailed portrait of a nation in the grip and thrall of totalitarianism. Margot Bettauer Dembo’s expert new translation makes the complete text of this great political novel available in English for the first time.” (Catalogue)

The occasional virgin / al-Shaykh, Hanan
“From a major novelist of the Arab world comes a bold, witty and highly contemporary novel about two women looking for love, set in Italy, Lebanon and London. Painting a refreshingly truthful picture of modern womanhood, The Occasional Virgin perceptively explores sexuality, Islam and cultural identity and the difficulty of finding a man who’ll call when he says he will. Frank, funny and fearless, it is the colourful, wickedly entertaining story of two unforgettable characters, and the bizarre lengths we’ll go to for love.” (Catalogue)

The last Weynfeldt / Suter, Martin
“Adrian Weynfeldt is an art expert in an international auction house, a bachelor in his mid-fifties living in a grand Zurich apartment filled with costly paintings and antiques. Always correct and well-mannered, he’s given up on love until one night — entirely out of character for him — Weynfeldt decides to take home a ravishing but unaccountable young woman. The next morning, he finds her outside on his balcony threatening to jump. Weynfeldt talks her down… As their two lives become entangled, Weynfeldt gets embroiled in an art forgery scheme that threatens to destroy everything he and his prominent family have stood for. This refined page-turner moves behind elegant bourgeois facades into darker recesses of the heart.” (adapted from Catalogue)