Pukapuka hou: Kōanga, 2017 (New books: Spring 2017)

Wellington City Libraries now holds Cyrus Hingston’s Pou o Whakaue: marae of Whakaue, and we look forward to the arrival of his companion book, Pou o Ue. Rangi Matamua published Matariki the star of the year, and we welcome now the reo Māori edition, Matariki: te whetū tapu o te tau. Finally, some very interesting thoughts on kaupapa Māori by a collection of of our favourite authors and scholars.

Pou o Whakaue : marae of Whakaue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Whakaue is a history of eight marae of Whakaue – the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the tangata whenua and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the ancestor Whakaue and Te Arawa whanui.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCritical conversations in kaupapa Māori / edited by Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones.
“Kaupapa Māori theory and methodology developed over twenty years ago and have since become influential in social research, practice and policy areas. The collection contains chapters by Brad Coombes, Garrick Cooper, Mason Durie, Carl Mika, Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Alice Te Punga Somerville, Georgina Stewart and Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni, along with the collection editors.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverMatariki : te whetū tapu o te tau / Rangi Matamua.
“In midwinter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky, and its observation is celebrated with incantations on hilltops at dawn, balls, exhibitions, dinners and a vast number of events. The Matariki tradition has been re-established, and its regeneration coincides with a growing interest in Māori astronomy. Still, there remain some unanswered questions about how Matariki was traditionally observed. What is Matariki? Why did Māori observe Matariki? How did Māori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated? This book seeks answers to these questions and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and clebrated in our modern society.” (Back cover)

Image from VUPInternational indigenous rights in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Andrew Erueti.
“Over the past four decades, international indigenous rights have become a prominent aspect of international law and are now enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Yet, while endorsed by Aotearoa New Zealand in 2010, little remains known about how these standards came about, how the international movement that created them was established, and the implications of these standards on national reforms already protecting Māori rights. International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand seeks to answer these questions.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJuridical encounters : Māori and the colonial courts, 1840-1852 / Shaunnagh Dorsett
“From 1840 to 1852, the Crown Colony period, the British attempted to impose their own law on New Zealand. In theory Maori, as subjects of the Queen, were to be ruled by British law. But in fact, outside the small, isolated, British settlements, most Maori and many settlers lived according to tikanga … Shaunnagh Dorsett examines the shape that exceptional laws took in New Zealand, the ways they influenced institutional design and the engagement of Maori with those new institutions, particularly through the lowest courts in the land.” (Syndetics summary)

By their fruits you will know them : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church. Volume 2 / edited by Selwyn Katene.
“This book follows ‘Turning the Hearts of the Children’, exploring why so many Māori in the 1880s were inspired to question the mainstream churches and flock to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon church.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverHuia short stories. 12 : contemporary Māori fiction.
“Here are the best short stories and novel extracts from the Pikihuia Awards for Māori writers 2017 as judged by Whiti Hereaka, Paula Morris, Poia Rewi amd Rawinia Higgins. The book contains the stories from the finalists for Best Short Story written in English, Best Short Story written in te reo Māori and Best Novel Extract categories.” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverThese two hands : a memoir / Renée.
“Renee Paule lives in Otaki and teaches her Your Life, Your Story and her Poem a Week workshops there. This is just one version of her life, her story, told in patches, like a quilt.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe fuse box : essays on writing from Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters / edited by Emily Perkins and Chris Price.
“From Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters, The Fuse Box offers writing strategies and guidance on keeping the faith from some of our best writers. Starting with the instigating spark, through to currents and connections, these essays shine a light on the creative process. They explore what to write about and how to get started, how to keep the flow going over time, freedom and constraint, how your writing might meet the world, and how to make the most of accidents. Poets, dramatists, novelists and writing teachers open up to reveal their wiring in essays that are strikingly honest, political and playful.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 91. The story that matters by Tina Makereti.
p. 204. Patricia Grace : an interview with Briar Grace-Smith

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand between the wars / edited by Rachael Bell.
“If World War One was the crucible that forged an independent New Zealand identity, then the two decades following are surely the years in which the foundation for the new nation was laid. In shedding the last vestiges of colonial society in exchange for the trappings of a modern democratic nation, the 1920s and 1930s in New Zealand set a blueprint for state intervention and assistance that remained unchallenged for the next 50 years.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Once were muttonbirders: Ngāti Kuia’s flight to retain its Tītī harvesting rights by Peter Meihana.

New books in our Maori collection

In this selection we have another beautiful art book – Artefacts of Encounter – which begins with stories of artefacts collected during Cook’s three voyages, followed by examples of colonial collecting and museum histories.

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania. … The collection includes some 100 artefacts dating from Cook’s first voyage. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Syndetics summary)

Image from Huia PublishingThe struggle for Māori fishing rights : te ika a Māori / Brian Bargh.
“Maori fishing rights were ignored by the Crown from the time the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840. Although guaranteed by the Treaty, Maori struggled to re-establish these rights until the 1980s after years of argument in the courts. Four pou, or pillars of support, significantly assisted in the recognition and eventual recovery of Maori fishing rights: the Treaty of Waitangi; the courts; the Waitangi Tribunal and the resilience and tenacity of Maori people, who never gave up fighting for what was right.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWomen of the Catlins : life in the deep south / edited by Diana Noonan ; photography by Cris Antona.
“A haunting, off-the-beaten-track destination, the little-known Catlins region of New Zealand is as mysterious today as it ever was. In this first in-depth look at the lives of its inhabitants, award-winning writer Diana Noonan and photographer Cris Antona collaborate to capture the thoughts and feelings of 26 women from this remote outpost. As the subjects speak for themselves on topics as diverse as family, work, isolation and their relationship with the environment, there is, at last, an opportunity for readers to enter into the heart of this rugged, unknown landscape where few venture and only the strongest make it home.” (Syndetics summary) Includes lives of: Rona Williamson (Ngāi Tahu) ; Heni Landreth (Ngāti Porou) ; Liz Cairns (Ngāpuhi), ; Nikeisha Clarke (Ngāi Tahu)

Te herenga reo : indigenous storytellers, Matariki, 2015 / compiled and curated by Te Herenga Reo Press for Te Herenga Reo Trust.
Contributors: Tama Waipara, Rob Ruha, Marama Davidson, Cilla Ruha, Michelle Ngamoki, Dayle Takitimu.

Syndetics book coverKa ngaro te reo : Maori language under siege in the nineteenth century / Paul Moon
“Ka ngaro te reo, ka ngaro taua, pera i te ngaro o te moa. If the language be lost, man will be lost, as dead as the moa. In 1800, te reo Maori was the only language spoken in New Zealand. By 1899, it was on the verge of disappearing altogether. In Ka Ngaro Te Reo, Paul Moon traces the spiralling decline of the language during an era of prolonged colonisation that saw political, economic, cultural and linguistic power shifting steadily into the hands of the European core…” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPerforming indigenous culture on stage and screen : a harmony of frenzy / Marianne Schultz.
“Examining corporeal expressions of indigenousness from an historical perspective, this book highlights the development of cultural hybridity in New Zealand via the popular performing arts, contributing new understandings of racial, ethnic, and gender identities through performance. The author offers an insightful and welcome examination of New Zealand performing arts via case studies of drama, music, and dance, performed both domestically and internationally.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe first migration : Māori origins 3000BC – AD1450 / Atholl Anderson.
“Thousands of years ago migrants from South China began the journey that took their descendants through the Pacific to the southernmost islands of Polynesia. Atholl Anderson’s … synthesis of research and tradition charts this epic journey of New Zealand’s first human inhabitants. Taken from … Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History this Text weaves together evidence from numerous sources: oral traditions, archaeology, genetics, linguistics, ethnography, historical observations, palaeoecology, climate change and more.” (Syndetics summary)

Beautiful books

The illustrated history, Tangata Whenua stands as a colossus amongst this month’s selection of books, but there are other remarkable books such as the story of Richard Nunns and Māori music, and the very readable snippets of life from Witi Ihimaera. Local poet, Apirana Taylor publishes his latest collection of poetry and Hōne Sadler’s Ngāpuhi narrative (in te reo Māori) will be treasured by his people and all speakers of te reo. The Walters whānau have recorded the stories of wharenui of the motu in another beautifully illustrated book.

Syndetics book coverThe Healthy Country? : A History of Life & Death in New Zealand
“In this book, Alistair Woodward and Tony Blakely tell the extraordinary story of life and death in Aotearoa New Zealand from first Maori settlement to the 21st century. Did Maori or Europeans live longer in 1769? How did Pakeha New Zealanders become the healthiest, most long lived people on the face of the globe (and why did Maori not enjoy the same life expectancy)? What caused New Zealanders’ health and longevity to be surpassed by other nations in the late twentieth century?… ‘The Healthy Country?’ is important reading for anyone interested in the story of New Zealanders and a decisive intervention in debates about health, disease and medicine.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 1. Before Cook : the long history of human longevity
Chap. 2. Māori majority : the first hundred years after Cook
Chap. 4. Decline and recovery ; Māori from 1860-1940

Polynesian legends and other poems / by A. Stanley Sherratt ; edited by Mark Pirie ; introduction by Dr Michael O’Leary.

Syndetics book coverTe ara puoro : a journey into the world of Māori music / Richard Nunns with Allan Thomas.
“Te Ara Puoro tells the story of Richard Nunn’s remarkable journey; of how fragments of knowledge given by elders were pieced together through countless presentations and performances on marae the length and breadth of the country; of how the instruments were re-created and developed; and of how he subsequently mastered their playing. The book gathers together an enormous amount of the current knowledge about taonga puoro, and will undoubtedly be the most important written resource in existence on the subject. It also charts the many other paths that Richard has taken with the music, including the huge variety of recordings he has done, his sound-track work, and his playing in other genres, such as free jazz and classical”–Publisher website.

The Mangatū remedies report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Supreme Court directed Waitangi Tribunal hearing. In 1961, the Crown had purchased 8,522 acres of land in the Mangatū 1 block north of Gisborne for the establishment of a forest to prevent hill country erosion and downstream flooding. The Tribunal had earlier found that the Crown had breached the Treaty of Waitangi when it acquired this land, and in the current inquiry, four claimant groups – the Mangatū Incorporation, Te Aitanga a Māhaki and Affiliates, Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, and Te Whānau a Kai – sought binding recommendations relating to the Mangatū Crown forest licensed lands. The Tribunal strongly urged the applicants to reunite and return to negotiations with the Crown.”–Publisher information.

Koowhiti / editorial panel: Tanemahuta Gray, Merenia Gray, Jennifer Stevenson, Peter Cleave, Paul Moon and Linda Ashley.

Syndetics book coverMāori boy : a memoir of childhood / Witi Ihimaera.“This honest, stirring work tells of the family and community into which Ihimaera was born, of his early life in rural New Zealand, of family secrets, of facing anguish and challenges, and of laughter and love. As Ihimaera recounts the myths that formed his early imagination, he also reveals the experiences from real life that wriggle into his fiction. Alive with an inventive, stimulating narrative and vividly portrayed relatives, this memoir is engrossing, entertaining and moving, but, more than this, it is also a vital record of what it means to grow up Māori”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMarae : te tatau pounamu : a journey around New Zealand’s meeting houses / Muru, Robin & Sam Walters. “A documentation of and tribute to New Zealand’s wharenui, big and small … Includes detailed shots of their carvings, kōwhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event”–Publisher information.
“For three years Muru, Robin and Sam Walters visited this country’s marae to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house… this handsome book captures the huge variety of New Zealand’s original architecture”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPuna wai kōrero : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan.
“Two leading Māori scholars collect Māori poetic voices in English and let flow a wellspring of poetry. From both revered established writers as well as exciting new voices, the poems in Puna Wai Korero offer a broad picture of Maori poetry in English. The voices are many and diverse: confident, angry, traditional, respectful, experimental, despairing and full of hope, expressing a range of poetic techniques and the full scope of what it is to be Māori”–Publisher’s website.

Syndetics book coverTangata whenua : an illustrated history / Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris.
“Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Māori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers an overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverThe breathing tree : new poems / Apirana Taylor.
“This collection offers forty new poems from popular poet Apirana Taylor. Inspired by nature and mythology, he shifts his focus from the mundane to the mysterious”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPrendergast : legal villain? / Grant Morris.
“James Prendergast is the most infamous figure in New Zealand’s legal history, known mainly for his condemnation of the Treaty of Waitangi as “a simple nullity” in 1877. But during his lifetime Prendergast was a highly respected lawyer and judge. He was arguably New Zealand’s dominant legal professional from 1865 to 1899, and his good reputation remained intact until the 1980s, when the Treaty of Waitangi finally returned to the centre of New Zealand political life. The more the Treaty has been celebrated, the more Prendergast has been condemned. “–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPēwhairangi : Bay of Islands missions and Māori 1814 to 1845 / Angela Middleton.
“… It is the story of New Zealand’s first permanaent European settlement at Hoki and the church mission that it represented, and of the other mission communities subsequently established in the Bay of Islands, at Kerikeri, Paihia, Waimate and Te Puna. It is a story of Ngāpuhi and Pākehā engagement, as neighbours, over four decades.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverKo tautoro, te pito o tōku ao : a Ngāpuhi narrative / Hōne Sadler.
“Sadler illustrates the unbroken chain of Ngāpuhi sovereignty by looking in-depth at his own hapū of Ngāti Moerewa, Ngāti Rangi and Ngāi Tawake ki te Waokū of Tautoro and Matarāua. The narrative is told through weaving together karakia and whakapapa, histories and kōrero that have been part of the oral traditions of Ngāpuhi’s whānau, hapū and iwi and handed down through the generations on marae and other gathering places”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTurning the hearts of the children : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church / edited by Selwyn Kātene.
“History of Church of Latter-day Saints involvement with Māori in NZ, with chapters based on 12 early prominent Māori figures”–Publisher information. “…Mormons did not reject traditional Māori socio-cultural mores. They shared reverence for family and genealogy and were guided by visions and dreams”–back cover. Profiled: Hirini Whaanga, Raihi Ngāwaka, Whatahoro Jury, Ngāhuia Chase, Percy Going, Hōhepa Heperi, Te Rāwhiti Paerata, Stuart Meha, Wetekia Elkington, Sidney Christy, Pare Takana (Duncan), Tūrake Manuirirangi.

Aotearoa New Zealand social work ; vol. 24, no. 4 (Review ed., 2014)
p. 65. Spirituality and social work : introducing a spiritual dimension into social work education and practice by Carol Phillips.

Archaeology in New Zealand ; vol. 57, no. 4 (December 2014)
P. 199. New Zealand’s settlement date : the last word? (or at least the latest) by Garry Law.
An instant vote taken without warning, at the 2014 NZAA Conference requesting participants to nominate a single AD date “for the earliest settlement of New Zealand by ancestors of the Maori.” 51 votes were accepted.

New Zealand journal of educational studies ; vol. 49, no. 2 (2014)
p. 176. Researching identity with indigenous D/deaf youth by Anne Hynds, Susan Faircloth, Clint Green and Helen Jacob.
p. 205. Representing Māori youth voices in community education research by Joanna Kidman.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 48, no. 2 (October 2014)
p. 50. Solidarity across the ‘colour line’ : Māori representation in the Maoriland worker, 1910-1914 by Cybele Locke.
p. 119. A window for revisionism : presenting te Tiriti in the Primary school bulletins, 1957 by Rachael Bell.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 1 (2014)
p. 20. The problematic portraits of Pomare II by Keith Giles.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 3 (2014)
p. 5. William Swanson Read Bloomfield (1885-1968) ; was he the first architect with Māori ancestry? by Denys Oldham.
p. 17. Well off the beaten track ; the site of New Zealand’s first Roman Catholic mass by Robin Astridge.

Oral history in New Zealand ; vol. 26 (2014)
p. 31. Tuia te ao marama : oral histories with Māori mental health nurses by Maria baker, Tio Sewell & Hineroa Hakiaha.

Tautohe, Tiriti, Tikanga – Māori recent picks

Wars and weapons figure strongly in this month’s books, but a wonderful reprint of essays by Roger Neich enriched with superb illustrations holds pride of place for me. Also included, a collection of poetry by Hinemoana Baker, and an interesting play Te Keni by Michalanne Forster along with the story of printer William Woon.

Syndetics book coverWaha = Mouth / Hinemoana Baker.
Hinemoana Baker is the “author of two collections of poetry, … edits the online journal of Whitireia New Zealand’s Creative Writing Programme, and co-edited the anthropology Kaupapa : New Zealand poets, World Issues… In 2009 she was the Arts Queensland Poet in Residence ; in 2010 she was one of 38 writers in residence at the University of Iowa International Writing Programme ; and in 2014 she is writer in residence at Victoria University in Wellington”– Inside cover.

Syndetics book coverBeyond the imperial frontier : the contest for colonial New Zealand / Vincent O’Malley.
“Beyond the Imperial Frontier is an exploration of the different ways Maori and Pakeha ‘fronted’ one another – the zones of contact and encounter – across the nineteenth century. Beginning with a pre-1840 era marked by significant cooperation, Vincent O’Malley details the emergence of a more competitive and conflicted post-Treaty world. As a collected work, these essays also chart the development of a leading New Zealand historian.” (Syndetics summary)

William Woon 1803-1858 : Wesleyan printer in Tonga and New Zealand / Gary A. M. Clover.
“The Wesleyan mission press played a supplementary but useful part…Woon’s [printings] helped to introduce a whole generation of Tongan and Maori scholars to the world of reading and writing which alone would have been enough to transform their societies into at least semi-literate ones. Because they were printed solely in the two indigenous languages, Woon was among those who were instrumental in putting Christian ideas and values, into the hands and minds of avid readers in both islands…His printing was therefore one key factor in the successful Christian evangelism of both lands”–[C J Parr, in, A missionary library]–inside back cover.

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Questions continue to emerge: Was it just? Was it right? Was Kereopa Te Rau even behind the murder? And who was Volkner – was he a spy or an innocent? In a personal quest, author Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Downfall : three New Zealand history plays / Michelanne Forster.
“Downfall offers an opportunity to look at the history of New Zealand through a dramatic lens. Te Keni explores the fraught relationship between Maori and Pakeha in the early colonial period. Larnach reveals the dynamics of the prominent family who established Larnach Castle in Dunedin. My Heart is Bathed in Blood examines the tragic implications of a relationship between two young medical students. Each play is introduced with an essay that provides historical context and performance history. Downfall is ideal for students and teachers of drama and for those with an interest in New Zealand’s rich heritage”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Te Keni is a story of Thomas Kendall, Hongi Hika, and Samuel Marsden. Much of the work was written during Peter Wells’ Ursula Bethell writing residency at the Unversity of Canterbury, 1993 — pp. 209-210.

Syndetics book coverMāori tales of love, war & mana / David Simmons.
“Maori Tales of Love War and Mana has been written after more than 60 years of research and field work with the author talking with local elders as well as working from the Otago Museum and Auckland War Memorial Museum (of which he was for a time Assistant Director) where he collected local traditions from throughout New Zealand, in places as widespread as the Far North, Fiordland and the Chatham Islands. More than 50 tales are related and include local versions of popular traditions and tribal history. The stories follow great Maori battles and migrations through New Zealand. The book is organised into Maori regions, including remote areas such as Fiordland and Chathams. Some of the tales have not been previously published; others given a local slant to more familiar traditions. Includes extensive references and indices. Illustrated with wood engravings by the Late E. Mervyn Taylor, leading artist of mid-20th century. David Simmons is a distinguished scholar and author of several popular books about Maori history and culture.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori weapons in pre-European New Zealand / Jeff Evans.
An introduction to the weapons that made up the armoury of tribes in pre-European New Zealand. Drawing on historical sources and contemporary expertise the author explains the manufacture, maintenance and use of each of the principal weapons: two handed weapons (including pouwhenua and tewatewha), patu and mere, spears (including huata and tokotoko), and other weapons (including hoeroa and oka).

Tradition and change in Māori and Pacific art : essays / by Roger Neich : edited by Chanel Clarke, Fuli Pereira and Nigel Prickett.
“This is Roger’s final gift to te ao M`qori, the Māori world. His impeccable scholarship, his skilled analysis, and his quiet sensitivity produced works of enduring value and excellence. For academics, he set a daunting standard ; to Māori and Pacific researchers, he offered genuine opportunity. He was generous, and humble, and he left us far too soon. E te Rangatira, moe mai ra”–Ngahuia Te Awekotuku (back page).

The Battle of Ōrākau : Māori veterans’ accounts : commemorating the 150th anniversary 1864-2014 / compiled and introduced by Robert Joseph and Paul Meredith.
“The Battle of Ōrākau was fought near Kihikihi from 31 March to 2 April 1864 by a contingent of approximately 300 Māori (including women and children) from Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Te Kohera, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāi Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Ngāti Whare, Patuheuheu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Rongowhakaata and Ngāti Maniapoto among other tribes”–Page 1.
Includes korero on Rewi Manga Maniapoto. Hitiri Te Paerata, Paitini Wi Tapeka, Te Huia Raureti, Winitana Tupotahi, Poupatate Te Huihi, Te Wairoa Piripi, Peita Kotuku, Te Putene Umanga / Te Rutene Te Uamairangi?, Harehare Atarea.

Syndetics book coverNew myths and old politics : the Waitangi Tribunal and the challenge of tradition / Tipene O’Regan.
“”Negotiating a claim before the Waitangi Tribunal can involve troubling challenges to an iwi’s legitimacy, sometimes from unexpected places. In this unique behind-the-scenes account of the negotiation of Ngai Tahu’s Waitangi Tribunal claim, Sir Tipene O’Regan describes what happened when claims of New Age mysticism attempted to undermine traditional whakapapa and academic scholarship”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Te tū hanga whare o Whetū = The rebuilding of Te Whetū o Te Rangi / Des Tatana Kahotea.
“”This is a photo-ethnography, a book that documents the rebuilding of a wharenui (meeting house). A project over a period from late 2006 that was planned, built and opened on December 20 2008 at Ngapeke, Tauranga. This is a Ngati Pukenga marae, an iwi of Mataatua waka origin. The original wharenui opened in 1915 was severely damaged by fire in September 2006. The people of the marae were determined to replace the wharenui with a new building complete with wharenui art. They undertook the creation of the wharenui art of kowhaiwhai, tukutuku and raranga whariki themselves and wood-carving was both commissioned and donated. This is a record of the activity that took place and the people who were involved. The book particularly shows some of the Maori customs associated with the re-building of a wharenui”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Reo, wairua and whenua

John Patterson produces another thought provoking book to add to his well-known writings on Māori values and there’s an interesting clutch of books on aspects of te reo, Puanga, and root vegetables for the garden.

Pacific parables : learning from Māori tradition / John Patterson ; with illustrations by Pat Hanly.
“In this book, John Patterson tries to encourage a more sensitive and sympathetic attitude among Pākehā people by showing how the traditional narratives of the Māori – what we still tend to call their myths and legends – can open our eyes to some of the deeper aspects of Māori philosophical and political thought.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMormon and Maori / Marjorie Newton.
“The New Zealand Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints … was really two missions: one conducted among Pakeha (European) New Zealanders, and another among the indigenous people of the islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand … Those assigned to Maori work learned to love a noble, proud, but disgruntled race, a people smarting from the confiscation of their land and their consequent loss of mana … disenchanted with orthodox Christian churches, and whose numbers were shrinking to the point where extinction or amalgamation seemed in the eyes of many Europeans, at the time of the Mormon approach, their only future prospect”–Preface, p. xi-xii.

Te Rongopai 1814 ‘Takoto te pai!’ : bicentenary reflections on Christian beginnings and developments in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Allan Davidson, Stuart Lange, Peter Lineham, Adrienne Puckey.
“ll of the essays .. were originally prepared for a conference held at Waitangi, 27-29 November 2012 … The conference aimed to stimulate critical reflection on missionary beginnings in New Zealand and the formative influences of Christianity in early inter-relationships of Māori and Pākehā”–Preface p. 7.

Syndetics book coverMaranga mai! : te reo and marae in crisis? / edited by Merata Kawharu.
“…te reo and tribal marae today seem to be in crisis… without a living language spoken regularly on the marae or in everyday lives, what does the future hold for Māori and for our nation?”–Back cover.
Writers include: Merimeri Penfold, Paul Tapsell, Hōne Sadler, Arapera Ngaha, Margie Hōhepa, Fraser Toi, Stephen McTaggart, Kiri Toki, Merata Kawharu, with Paratene Tane, Pounamu Jade Aikman-Dodd, Michael Hennessy

Syndetics book coverHow to find a taniwha : a deep connection between English and Māori words / Trevor Lloyd.
“Many languages have similar sounds and all have similar semantic elements that make up word meanings. But the existence of the same or equivalent sounds and elements of meaning in many words of two unrelated languages as described in this book, is very surprising and cannot be explained by current linguistic theory”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverThe value of the Māori language = Te hua o te reo Māori / edited by Rawinia Higgins, Poia Rewi and Vincent Olsen-Reeder.
“This collection of essays in Māori and English explores the actions taken to restore the status of the Māori language, challenges ideas about how the language can be revitalised and looks at approaches to ensure the future of the language. The chapters discuss issues around the Māori Language Act and Crown policy, community initiatives, language development in the education system, and support of Māori language in media”–Back cover.

The new electoral politics in New Zealand : the significance of the 2011 election / edited by Jack Vowles.
p. 141. Māori voters, public policy and privatisation by Ann Sullivan, Martin von Randow and Aimee Matiu.

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Puanga is the star Rigel in Orion. Most of the tribes of the Māori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Māori New Year. In Māori mythology he was believed to be the older brother of Matariki. His cosmic rising between May and June in the early morning sky signalled the beginning of winter which is why Māori knew him as the foremost winter star.”–Whakataki, p. 4.

Rauwaru, the proverbial garden : Ngā-weri, Māori root vegetables, their history and tips on their use / Nick Roskruge.
“Root vegetables termed nga-weri in Māori, are classified as ‘root’ crops but can actually be either roots, tubers, swollen stems or even fungi… Vegetables and food crops need to be able to survive through to harvest in this climate and root crops are especially valuable for their ability to store in-ground beyond the life of the plant itself.”–p. ii

I ngā rā o mua

This month there are historical accounts and threads such as The Bay of Plenty historical review which has delivered an attractively written and illustrated booklet commemorating the 150 year old Battle of Pukehinahina, Gate Pa. This slim volume covers weapons, records and maps, biographical essays, relics, naval and army snippets, Crabbe’s flag, etc.

Working as allies : supporters of indigenous justice reflect / Jen Margaret
“Non-indigenous supporters of indigenous justice in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand discuss their practice. Through in-depth interviews they candidly share the challenges of this work and their responses to these. They reflect on what led them to become involved in indigenous justice issues, what informs their approach and how they know if their work is useful.” (Back cover)
Includes the thoughts of Tim Howard, Alex Barnes, Melanie Nelson, Joan Macdonald, Jonathan La Nauze, Indira Narayan, Lorelle Savage, Pru Gell, Clare Land and Jen Margaret, Mitzi Nairn

Syndetics book coverTe Awa Atua = Menstruation in the pre-colonial Māori world : an examination of stories, ceremonies and practices regarding menstruation in the pre-colonial Māori world : based on a Masters thesis / Ngāhuia Murphy.
“By examining stories about menstruation located in Māori cosmologies, tribal histories, oral literatures, ceremonies and rites, Ngāhuia Murphy argues that menstruation was seen as a medium of whakapapa (genealogy) that connected Māori women to their pantheon of atua (deities). Ancient rites, recorded in tribal songs and chants, reveal that menstrual blood was used for psychic and spiritual protection. These examples unveil striking Indigenous constructs of womanhood that radically challenge notions of female inferiority and menstrual pollution.” (Back cover)
The book references Rose Pere, Awa atua, Maui, Kurawaka

Te kāhui maunga : the National Park District Inquiry Report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Waitangi Tribunal inquiry into alleged acts and omissions of the Crown in relation to the iwi and hapū of te kāhui maunga, the cluster of mountains in the central North Island that includes Tongariro, Ngāuruhoe, and Ruapehu. Of the 41 claims heard, many related to the establishment and management of the Tongariro National Park and the creation and operation of the Tongariro power development scheme. The report covers the parks, waterways, hydropower, geothermal resources, and land alienations.” (Publisher information)

Te Haa o te reo : the inspiration of the language.   Te Rōpū Pakihi Inc.   [2013].
“This resource has been developed to assist Māori business owners who seek to express kaupapa in their business”–Page 3.
: Karakia — Mihimihi — Whakatauki — Himene — Waiata — Kiwaha — Kupu o tuhi kōrero — Kupu mo te wharemahi.

Historical review : Bay of Plenty journal of history ; vol. 62, no. 1 (2014)
Relics of Gate Pa, Pukehinahina (special issue)
p. 27. Robley’s living taonga. These two pages include the words of Maui Dalvanius Prime describing the descendants of Horatio Gordon Robley and Harete Mauao of Matapihi. Their child was Hamiora Tu Ropere, and their grandchildren, Hepeta Hamiora Tu and Te Hepiwhara Hamiora Tu. Te Hepiwhara married Te Hauparoa Whareaitu, of Taranaki.

Kōrero nehe: te Moana nui a Kiwa, ngā mihinare, pakanga

Histories of the Pacific Ocean, missionaries and the fight for land but the taonga amongst this selection is a beautifully illustrated text (Te Reo Māori) by Keri Kaa, pictures by Martin D. Page.

Syndetics book coverKeeping languages alive : documentation, pedagogy and revitalization / edited by Mari C. Jones and Sarah Ogilvie.
“Many of the world’s languages have diminishing numbers of speakers and are in danger of falling silent. Around the globe, a large body of linguists are collaborating with members of indigenous communities to keep these languages alive. Mindful that their work will be used by future speech communities to learn, teach and revitalise their languages, scholars face new challenges in the way they gather materials and in the way they present their findings. This volume discusses current efforts to record, collect and archive endangered languages in traditional and new media that will support future language learners and speakers. ” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverPacific histories : ocean, land, people / edited by David Armitage and Alison Bashford.
“The first comprehensive account to place the Pacific Islands, the Pacific Rim and the Pacific Ocean into the perspective of world history. A distinguished international team of historians provides a multidimensional account of the Pacific, its inhabitants and the lands within and around it over 50,000 years, with special attention to the peoples of Oceania. It providing chronological coverage along with analyses of themes such as the environment, migration and the economy; religion, law and science; race, gender and politics.” (Cover)

Syndetics book coverTaka ki rō wai : he kōrero pūrākau mō tētāhi hoiho / ko Keri Kaa, te kaituhi ; ko Martin D. Page, te kaitā pikitia, kaitātai pukapuka.
“A true story about the birth of a foal, set in the small rural community of Rangitukia, on the East Cape of the East Coast, in the North Island of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Reflecting rural Māori life, the story is an observation of the cooperation between animals, and contemplates the magical and the miracle in nature.” (Publisher’s information)

Between the kindling and the blaze : reflections on the concept of mana / Ben Brown.
[This] “is a bold exploration of the concept of mana.  In resonant poetry and short prose poetry, the author does not seek to define mana but rather reflect on its myriad nuances.  “The colour of mana is red they say, from warm sunset tones to bold vigorous and bloody shades of power and authority, the kaka feather, the dog-skin cloak,  the ochre of the earth.  But where is the white of  purity, the certainty of black, the humility of grey?  Colour then, will not suffice in the exploration of mana.  How can a humble man be proud?  Why is the mountain more than a mountain?  How does a river flow in my veins and where is the strenght in silence?  This book is not silent.  It cannot be…” (Back cover)

Te paruhi a ngā tākuta / Nigel Beckford and Mike Fitzsimons, interviews, writing, publishing.
“Tells the story of 27 Māori doctors and students. Some just starting their careers, others reflecting on decades of service, sacrifice and experience. Collectively, these stories span the history of Te Ohu Rata O Aotearoa – Māori Medical Practitioners Association (Te ORA) from trailblazing early Māori GPs to the latest generation of Māori health professionals and learners… Many of the people in this book have challenged New Zealand’s health system and influenced the provision of health services to Māori whānau and communities for the better.” (Back cover)

A desperate dawn : the battle for Turuturu Mokai 1868 / Nigel Ogle and Ron Crosby ; illustrations and photography, Nigel Ogle.
“In July 1868 South Taranaki chief Titokowaru indicated his toughening attitude toward European settlement in his territory by attacking the small military redoubt at Turuturu Mokai. That battle led to a campaign where Maori and Pakeha fought some of the most desperate and violent battles of the New Zealand wars. This book puts the battle into a social, political, technological and historical contecxt.” (Back cover)

Taiao, mahi toi, mahi ahuwhenua

My personal highlights this month cover three subjects: environmental history, a story of Te Aro Pā, and art books on weaving, a printmaker, and the wonderful work of Cliff Whiting.

Syndetics book coverNgā hurihanga ako kohungahunga = Transformative teaching practices in early childhood education / edited by Anne Grey and Beverley Clark.
“Ngā Hurihanga Ako Kōhungahunga – Transformative teaching practices in early childhood education introduces current innovations in early childhood education teaching practice in New Zealand and discusses various aspects of pedagogical practice in ways designed to both stimulate and inform the student of early childhood education. Inherently complex and involving many facets shaped by context, pedagogical practice in early childhood education is always evolving and subjective in nature. With this text the editors aim to engage the teacher/learner in recognising and responding to the complexity of good pedagogical practice, informing teacher choices about: philosophical approaches; decision making about curriculum; ethical approaches to relationship building; and interactions with children and their families.” (Back cover)

Mawhitiwhiti patterns and woven bags : a collection of mawhitiwhiti patterns and their use along with instructions for weaving string bags / Robin Hill.
“In NZ Maori weaving mawhitiwhiti is the diversion of the whenu, or warp threads, from the vertical to create different patterns. This booklet is designed to be used by those with a basic knowledge of weaving techniques.” (Abridged from Back cover)

Syndetics book coverMaking a new land : environmental histories of New Zealand / edited by Eric Pawson and Tom Brooking.
“Making a new land presents an interdisciplinary perspective on one of the most rapid extensive transformations in human history : that which followed Maori and then European colonisation of New Zealand’s temperate islands” (Back cover)
p. 35. A fragile plenty : pre-European Māori and the New Zealand environment by Atholl Anderson.
p. 52. Contesting resources : Māori, Pākehā and a tenurial revolution by Evelyn Stokes.
p. 293. Ngāi Tahu and the ‘nature’ of Māori modernity by Michael J. Stevens.

Syndetics book coverAhuwhenua : celebrating 80 years of Māori farming / Danny Keenan.
“I am not sure that many recognise what the impact of the systematic appropriation of Māori land had on the self-esteem, morale and natural instincts of Māori to manage and nurture their land. It was Ngata who started the renaissance Māori agriculture which had naturally flourished until the arrival of the first settlers the settlers and the Crown did not just take land from Māori, they took the best land and what was left was usually the least desirable and highly fragmented” (Abridged from foreword)

Hinehauone Coralie Cameron, printmaker / Gail Ross.
“Hinehauone known as Corrie Cameron grew up on a sheep farm in the Wairarapa. She trained as an artist in Wellington, London and Paris, and went on to create images of farmhands, horticultural workers, and landscapes which resonated with spirit of place” (Abridged from back cover)

Syndetics book coverCliff Whiting : he toi nuku, he toi rangi / Ian Christensen.
“This new book provides insights to the thinking, the work and the development of this remarkable artist who has made an outstanding contribution to the tradition of Maori art making and meeting house decoration, forging innovative techniques and practises, exploring new materials and forms, while at the same time maintaining essential elements of tradition, ensuring the relevancy of ‘beliefs, values and mana in today’s and tomorrow’s world.'” (Publisher description)

Twenty New Zealand playwrights / Michelanne Forster and Vivienne Plumb.
p. 34 Hone Kouka
p. 84 Briar Grace-Smith
p. 120 Renee

Playmarket 40 : 40 years of playwriting in New Zealand / edited by Laurie Atkinson with David O’Donnell (consulting editor).
p. 34 Mā te rēhia e kawe by John Huria
p. 88 Ko te kōrero te kai a te rangatira by Hone Kouka

Fabulous Frocks: New Zealand History Recent Picks for January

At first glance the title of this post does not make much sense, as you scroll down through the book titles depicting pig hunting and hunting with helicopters, lost gold and lost heritage in forgotten landmarks. Keep scrolling and you will see the Hawkes Bay Maraekakaho sheep and cattle station and then on to unique motorbike collections, the first New Zealand craft beer, and finally Dolphins of Aotearoa. The last title is a book called Women of Substance, unfortunately we have no cover image but with the tagline “the Otago women who wore fabulous frocks,” it is my pick of the bunch and why it gets the mention in the title. It tells the story of 39 dresses featured in an exhibition at the Otago Settlers museum. Each frock dating from 1859 to the late 1880s is photgraphed and described in detail and with a short biography of its wearer gives an insight into the life and times of these women.

Syndetics book coverThe black singlet brigade : tales of adventure in the NZ bush / Tony Walsh
“Tony Walsh was first introduced to NZ’s bush clad ranges, to pig hunting and some life-defining experiences by Ned Tuite, whose usual attire was a black woollen bush singlet and a pair of khaki shorts suspended from a thin leather belt. Through Ned, Tony met a band of those iconic good keen men of an era now past, and began a journey of experiences he will never forget. There were the likes of ugly Eddie, who ate all the pigs’ ears; Jack, who thought the ghosts were after him after a midnight tumble down the hill; or Charlie, who didn’t know whether to mash his spuds before or after they were cooked. Men whose characters were as colourful and multifaceted as the forests and mountains they came from. The Black Singlet Brigade is a memoir written with eloquence and a dash of humour at every turn. It combines the untamed beauty of the wild with hilarious adventures and unique characters to build a picture of a life long gone, in the bush and back-country of New Zealand.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverInjun Joe : the legend of Smoking Joe Collins / Marion Day.
“This is the life story of Injun Joe, born Wellwyn Harris Collins in 1950. Joe became well known as an elite hunter-helicopter pilot, one of New Zealand’s most dangerous occupations of the time, in what is now known as The Last Great Adventure.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverLost Gold : the 100-year search for the gold reef of Northwest Nelson / Paul Bensemann.
“As a young man in the mid-1970s, Paul Bensemann was told an archetypal ‘lost gold’ story by his neighbour, a tobacco farmer in the Motueka Valley on the edge of what is now Kahurangi National Park. The story concerned an old prospector who had found a huge exposed gold reef, shining in the sun, deep in the mountain wilderness of Northwest Nelson. Just before he died, the prospector drew a map, and to Paul’s amazement his neighbour then produced the old, tatty, hand-drawn map, which had been handed down to him from his father. Lost Gold follows the many twists and turns of this 105-year-old story, and tries to explain why the reef has never been rediscovered. But in the end, whether or not the reef exists is only part of the story, and perhaps the bigger treasure here is the real tale of men in pursuit of their own El Dorado.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s lost heritage : the stories behind our forgotten landmarks / Richard Wolfe.
“Features 20 notable structures which, for various reasons, no longer exist. Most of the buildings have been demolished in the name of urban development, creating controversy. Each building is discussed and illustrated including the circumstances of its demise. The selection includes: Ruapekapeka Pa in Northland (burned down deliberately), Admiralty House in Auckland (demolished to make way for new roads) Wellington’s Parliament Buildings (accidental fire) Invercargill’s Seacliff Asylum (fire), TJ Edmonds landmark factory (bulldozed). What emerges is a fascinating social and historical narrative that sheds light on parts of New Zealand’s cultural history and reveals the truth of the old adage that history repeats.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverA changing land : Sir Donald McLean’s Maraekakaho, 1857 to today / Alan Scarfe.
“The first two parts tell the story of the development of Hawke’s Bay Maraekakaho, one of the country’s largest and most iconic sheep and cattle stations which was established by Donald McLean and then further developed by his son Douglas McLean. The final part of A Changing Land traces how much of Maraekakaho has evolved into a varied patchwork of stock and cropping farms, vineyards, smallholdings, olive groves, alpaca farms and tree plantations over the last century.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverKiwi bike culture : unique motorbike collections / Steve Holmes.
“Delves into the love affair New Zealanders have with their motorbikes. From Harley-Davidsons to Vespas, and everything in between, this book is about the men and women whose lives revolve, in some way, around two-wheeled machinery.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverThe McCashin’s story and the Kiwi brewing revolution it sparked / John McCrystal & Simon Farrell-Green.
“The craft beer industry is one of New Zealand’s local business success stories, and it’s thriving. It all began with Terry McCashin establishing Mac’s Ale back in the 1980s. This book tells the story of the entrepreneurial McCashin family and the challenges they’ve faced over the years. They’re now rebuilding their brand with new beers such as Stoke, and a highly successful range of ciders. It also includes general craft beer information such as: What makes a craft beer; how beer gets made; a day in the life of McCashins; how to drink beer; what sort of glass to use; what different styles mean; the difference between an ale and a lager. Plus: Nelson: The craft beer capital. What has made Nelson such an extraordinary place for craft beer? The book includes short profiles on each of the breweries, pubs and cafes on the trail and the remarkable story of New Zealand hops and how they’ve supported Nelson and New Zealand’s craft beer revolution.” (Adapted from publisher information)

Syndetics book coverDolphins of Aotearoa : living with New Zealand dolphins / Raewyn Peart. “Dolphins of Aotearoa explores the ongoing relationship between humans and dolphins in New Zealand. Over this nation’s rich history, numerous people, both Maori and Pakeha, have sought out dolphins and significant numbers of dolphins have sought out people. This book tells the stories of many of these remarkable encounters. Importantly, Dolphins of Aotearoa also summarises the work of the dedicated scientists and researchers who over recent decades have learnt so much about our dolphins. Extensively researched and lavishly illustrated with historic and contemporary photographs, and incorporating a guide to all of the dolphins of New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Women of substance : the Otago women who wore “fabulous frocks” / Seán G. Brosnahan.
“Fabulous Frocks was the title of an exhibition held at the Otago Settlers Museum in 2003. The exhibition presented 39 dresses from the Museum’s costume collection worn by nineteenth-century Otago women. A la mode in the mud: The colonial pursuit of fashion. The colonists’ dream: Genteel, respectable and upwardly mobile. In search of the women behind the dresses. (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Ara mai he tētēkura: Visioning our futures

Ki te kahore he whakakitenga ka ngaro te iwi

Manu AO Academy
Ara mai he tētēkura : visioning our futures

Mate atu he tētēkura, whakaeke mai he tētēkura

Wharewaka waitangi 88939_0452

Yesterday was one of those delightful days : a room full of Māori academics at Te Raukura : Wharewaka, on the waterfront of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, giving voice to their ideas on the āhua of new and emerging Māori academic leadership.

The formation of the Manu AO Academy is yet one more example of Mason Durie’s moemoeā and koha to New Zealand academia and practitioners, in advancing and developing a futuristic collective society and culture for every New Zealander. This is the trendsetting man who in the past had me (an outsider to health or tertiary systems) searching furiously to understand “nga whare tapa wha”, te pae mahutonga, and, more recently, transformational and transactional leadership.

So, I’m at the Wharewaka, my pen on auto scrawl, in a storm of frenzied note-taking, trying to net the whakaaro of first-up speaker, Tā Tipene ORegan, – his main themes being:
o A leader needs followers – if no one follows you, you are not a leader.
o A leader will resonate with and share the individual’s qualities, and aspirations, and will take you with him, on a journey to somewhere

Leaders need followers
Followers need a dream
Managers occupy a space

At the moment we are just imitating the stuff around us, but we need to own our own culture, develop a sustainable maintenance of heritage and intergenerational identity. And as yet there is no Māori business model that will lead us successfully into the future.

iwi need to move from a mindset of distribution of resources
to the creation of dynamic adaptation

[Invest for best rather than distribution]

where thought leaders challenge and innovate for what confronts us

Aha, needless to say, here is a man with serious vision, — a true leader sweeping us quickly along his journey.

Ara mai he tētēkura : visioning our futures edited by Paul Whitinui, Marewa Glover, and Dan Hikuroa. Published by Otago University Press.
In the various chapters of this book, a succession of young Māori academics: Amohia Boulton, Simon Lambert, Paul Whitinui, Megan Hall, Renei Ngawati, Reremoana Theodore, Marewa Glover, Melanie Cheung, speak of their thoughts and experiences for a new and emerging Māori academic leadership.
There was no difficulty in understanding and identifying with fieldworkers, and their themes of conflicting loyalties to iwi and institution, and, partnering with partners who haven’t bought into your vision or felt the need to share a vision, or indeed, the dangers of becoming compromised by others’ thoughts, without developing original ideas.
The speakers brought life to the chapters which they had co-written in Ara mai he tētēkura, and I urge you to seek out this book at your local library – or book shop.
But my attention was seriously derailed by the Megan Hall’s seemingly wild card reference to a blog by Alice Te Punga Somerville and her description of the palimpsest of moko on Rihanna’s hand. But there it was –a compelling example of layer upon layer of stories, of culture and history – and a need for every Māori academic developer to see and understand exactly what has been, and what now lies before their eyes.

A dance down Google land located Alice’s blog.

“… We talk now about places as palimpsests : the impossibility of engaging with any one account of history (either a story about history or its material proof) without noticing – even being distracted by – the many layers of history underneath. Rihanna’s hand is a palimpsest because it’s a surface on which has been layered many stories: a tattoo, another tattoo. However, each of those stories is itself and other story…”

She found culture in a hopeless place.

This is not really about Rihanna’s hand – what power could the small hand of a single Barbadian woman really have over us? – but it is about the many layers of history we cannot help but see when we look at her skin. And, as we ‘read’ each text, more texts become apparent: her African skin bearing the marks of Caribbean diaspora, the tattoo applied in Aotearoa, and finally a design applied in another (American-occupied, Spanish-speaking) part of the Caribbean which is apparently intended to look like the henna design which has its roots in the Indian subcontinent…”

This is a brilliant blog – by a brilliant young Māori academic leader. Please do click the link above and read the whole whakaaro.-

As for the rest of the speakers at the symposium – all so very interesting – you will need to locate the stream of the day’s kōrero –- hopefully on the Massey website.

The day concluded with a launch of a motivational flipchart which was “a compilation of a series of Manu Ao Academy Monday Motivational emails”(from the back page), and the three books on traditional and emerging issues and leadership. Selwyn Katene was a major author of the two books published by Huia Publishers.

Image from Huia Publishers
Image from Huia Publishers

Spirit of Māori Leadership by Selwyn Katene.
“The Spirit of Māori Leadership explores what leadership is, discusses different models and styles of Māori leadership, describes the qualities and approaches of Māori leaders and, using this knowledge, looks at the attributes and styles needed in future leaders. The book provides insights into and analysis of traditional and contemporary models of Māori leadership. From this, it identifies three connected themes: understanding what makes a good leader, the importance of people and relationships, and the need to formulate a strategic plan and examines four leadership models: transactional, charismatic, transformational and organic.” (From publisher)

Image from Huia Publishers
Image from Huia Publishers

He Kōrero Anamata: Future challenges for Māori by Selwyn Katene, and Malcolm Mulholland.
“This collection of essays by leading scholars – including academics and professionals from law, medicine, business and the social sciences – challenges our thinking on many fronts. The contributors draw on their research, knowledge and practical experience to address a variety of contemporary issues of importance to Māori. The topics explore identity and selfdetermination, the environment, te reo Māori, education, social and economic issues, and governance and leadership. Discussions reflect the many contexts within which new ideas arise and are then debated and explored, as well as the many ways in which knowledge can be created and shared. Throughout the book, Māori people, history, strengths, resources and circumstances are at the forefront.” (From publisher)

As the day drew to a close, we mingled for nibbles and drinks, bought our copies of the launched material, caught up with old friends and then departed for home, with more food for thought from an inspirational day.

Ko te kai a te rangatira he korero
The food of chiefs is eloquence

Ko te mahi a te rangatira ka whakatiratira nga iwi
The work of chiefs is uniting everyone

Ko te tohu o te rangatira, he manaaki
The sign of chiefs is respect