Three new Classical music additions

Our new additions to the classical music collection this week have a British flavour (well, two of them anyway!).

Cantata Memoria: For the Children, Karl Jenkins. Performed by Terfel, Thomas, Sinfonia Cymru and conducted by Karl Jenkins.
“On 21 October 1966, tragedy hit the Welsh village of Aberfan: when a colliery spoil tip above the village collapsed, 40,000 cubic metres of mining debris went downhill in a landslide, burying Pantglas Junior School and killing 116 children and 28 adults. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Aberfan disaster, Karl Jenkins wrote his Cantata Memoria for large vocal and orchestral forces, here performed with a star-studded cast headed by bass-baritone Bryn Terfel and soprano Elin Manahan Thomas” (cover).

Homage. Performed by Vilde Frang.
“‘For me these virtuoso miniatures are true gems,’ says… Vilde Frang. ‘Part of a tradition that goes back generations – one that needs to be kept alive – and an important aspect of the violin’s legacy. With this selection of pieces, I would like to pay tribute to the early 20th century’s great violinists. They left their mark on the violin repertoire, not only with their virtuosity but also through their own significant transcriptions and compositions, and brought the Art of the Encore into a golden era.'” (cover).

Symphonies 1 & 2, Sir Michael Tippett. Performed by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.
“Tippett’s first two published symphonies are mature and confident works dating from the middle of the last century. These coruscating accounts from Martyn Brabbins and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra are sure to win new friends for this marvellous music” (amazon.com review)

Four New Classical CD Additions

This week we focus on some compilations featuring transcriptions and arrangements, and throw in some Strauss tone poems for good measure.

#celloreimagined (Cello Reimagined). Performed by Daniel Müller-Schott.
“An artistic game of interrelationships and transference: thanks to brilliant technique, Daniel Müller-Schott reveals two new cello concertos from the (early)-Classical triumvirate of composer” (cover). Works include concertos be CPE Bach, Mozart, Haydn and also Johann Sebastian Bach.

Bezaly, Ashkenazy, works by Franck, Faure and Prokofiev. Performed by Sharon Bezaly and Vladimir Ashkenazy.
Three sonatas composed (and arranged) for flute and piano. “The two sonatas by César Franck and Gabriel Fauré were composed with the violin in mind, and even though Prokofiev’s sonata was originally intended for the flute it is often heard in the composer’s own version for violin and piano. But joined by the legendary pianist and conductor Vladimir Askenazy, Sharon Bezaly now claims (and reclaims) the three works for her own instrument, in eloquent performances that make the best possible case for the flute” (amazon.com).

Let Beauty Awake. Performed by Ellen Nisbeth and Bengt Forsberg.
English viola music. This is a full and varied examination of English compositions, some transcribed for solo viola by Ellen Nisbeth herself. The line up features Vaughan Williams, Britten (both original works, and reworkings of previous material, one piece based on a John Dowland song) and a viola sonata written in 1919 by Rebecca Clarke.

Ein Heldenleben, Tod und Verklärung, Richard Strauss. Performed by the Göteborgs Symfoniker.
Kent Nagano conducts two big symphonic poems by Richard Strauss. This is the second recording in an expected trilogy of a selection of Strauss’s works performed by Sweden’s national orchestra, which has a close association with the composer dating back to the early 20th century.

Classical Music Additions

This week our classical recent additions focus on French/Belgian and French-inspired performances and compositions, courtesy of Alpha Classics and Erato music labels.

Dixit Dominus, Handel & Magnificat, Bach. Performed by Vox Luminis.
A finalist for Presto Classical recording of the year, this album is beautifully produced by Belgian group Vox Luminis, directed by Lionel Meunier. “Bach and Handel are often presented as antipodes, whose musical output has little in common. … Even though their later careers could hardly be more different, it must be acknowledged that… both men were rooted in the musical culture of central Germany with its uniquely rich tradition” (booklet).

L’Homme de Génie, Haydn. Performed by the Kammerorchester Basel.
Volume 5 of the Haydn 2032 project, which aims to produce a complete set of recordings of Haydn’s symphonies before the 300th anniversary of his birth. Played on period instruments, this recording also includes the C minor Symphony by lesser-known Classical composer Joseph Martin Kraus.

Mirages. Performed by Sabine Devieilhe.
“Since the nineteenth century the coloratura soprano voice has been associated with female characters as alluring as they are exotic. This album focuses on French composers’ love affair with this exceptional voice, by means of which they draw the listener far from the real world” (back cover).

Quatuors Parisiens, Telemann. Performed by “Nevermind”.
The quartet of Anna Besson (flute), Lous Creac’h (violin), Robin Pharo (viola da gamba) and Jean Rondeau (harpsichord) combine to produce this recording of Telemann’s Nouveaux Quatuors Parisiens.

Enjoy these recently added classical CDs!

Classical music is perfect listening on long, hot summer evenings. Here’s a small selection of recent additions to our classical CD collection.

Best of The Hilliard Ensemble.
“When four British gentlemen went on tour together for the last time in 2014, that tour marked the end of a 40-year-long musical career. Four exquisite unaccompanied male voices, their strains uniting into pure concord and inimitably shaping the vocal music of past and present centuries for a delighted audience from Gregorian chant to Arvo Pärt” (CD cover).

The Epic of Gilgamesh, Martinu. Performed by the Prague Philharmonic Choir, Czech Philharmonic with soloists, and Simon Callow narrating.
This is the world premiere recording of the English version of Martinu’s oratorio. The Epic of Gilgamesh is an ancient Mesopotamian poem, believed to be the oldest surviving piece of literature. Reginald Campbell Thompson translated the work in 1928, and it is this translation Martinu used in his initial composition (his preference would have been Czech). However, the work was premiered in German in 1958 in Basel; hence this world-premiere recording.

Violin Concertos, Britten & Hindemith. Performed by Arabella Steinbacher.
“Breathtaking virtuosity flows seamlessly with expansive lyrical passages and fiendish passagework in this commanding performance by Arabella Steinbacher of the restless and technically demanding violin concertos of Britten and Hindemith in this new release… with the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin conducted by Vladimir Jurowski” (amazon.com).

More Classical CD additions

We have been busily processing new classical purchases (much more to come over the next few weeks!). Here are a few highlights:

Symphony No. 6, Pathétique, Tchaikovsky. Performed by MusicAeterna.
“Teodor Currentzis feels a very strong attachment to the music of Tchaikovsky… Naturally Currentzis has gravitated to the mighty sixth symphony undoubtedly Tchaikovsky’s greatest and most poignant symphony. The composer entitled the work ‘The Passionate Symphony’, employing a Russian word (Pateticheskaya), meaning ‘passionate’ or ’emotional’, that was then mistranslated into French as pathetique, ‘evoking pity’, yet the mistranslation survived subsequent productions in every country but Russia.” (amazon.com)

Wagner. Performed by Michael Volle with the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin.
A selection of arias for ‘heroic baritone’ from Wagner’s great operas, including Die Meistersinger, Das Rheingold and Die Walküre. “The multifaceted magic of Wagner’s great baritone roles has an even more profound resonance in a post-heroic era – impressively embodied by Michael Volle” (back cover).

Tapiola, En Saga, 8 Songs, Sibelius. Performed by Anne Sofie von Otter with the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra.
Sibelius, performed by the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, with Finnish conductor Hannu Lintu – sounds quite fitting (not to forget Anne Sofie von Otter of course)! The album consists of two tone poems, and a collection of eight songs, settings of poems by Finnish poet Johan Ludvig Runeberg, sung in Swedish and orchestrated by Aulis Sallinen.

Recently added Classical CDs

For this selection of new classical music CDs we spotlight some vocal works: some Baroque Italian music (sacred and secular), and a post-Romantic opera.

Pelléas et Mélisande, Debussy. Performed by the London Symphony Orchestra and soloists.
“Debussy’s only completed opera, Pelléas et Mélisande, is widely considered to be one of the 20th century’s greatest. His setting of Maurice Maeterlinck’s love triangle between Mélisande, Golaud, and his younger half-brother Pelléas, creates a distinctive and tense atmosphere – a world of ambiguity, darkness and light, life, death and love; all underpinned by Debussy’s complex and subtle harmonies, and expressive use of orchestral colour” (back cover).

Catharsis. Performed by Xavier Sabata.
Startling cover. “Around the year 1600, a group of Florentine aristocrats, inspired by ancient Greek drama, gave birth to opera. They set out to glorify human passions in such a strong way that the spectator’s soul would be cleansed. This was a process that Aristotle called catharsis. In a fascinating program featuring works by works by Orlandini, Conti, Torri, Vivaldi, Handel, Hasse, Caldara, Sarro and Ariosti, countertenor Xavier Sabata, accompanied by George Petrou and Armonia Atenea, captures these moments at the heart of legendary heroes of Baroque opera” (amazon.com).

Vespers 1610, Monteverdi. Performed by the Dunedin Consort.
Fully titled: Vespro della Beata Vergine. Recorded at the Greyfriars Kirk in Edinburgh, this performance – corralled by John Butt – concentrates its focus on some super vocal soloists, and features the wonderful His Majestys Sagbutts & Cornetts. Butt and the Dunedin Consort pay particular attention to getting the details of pitch and instrumentation spot-on, and as historically accurate as possible.

Sit back and enjoy these Classical CD additions

Here are three CDs we slipped into the classical music collection recently!

Quartets Op. 13, 44 No. 2, 4 Pieces, Frage Op. 9, Mendelssohn. Performed by Quatuor Arod.
“The Arod Quartet, founded just four years ago in Paris, makes its debut on Erato with an album of Mendelssohn, tracing his life through his works for string quartet. The composer has been important for the ensemble, not least by helping it win two major competitions. The members of the Arod have been mentored by both the Ebène and Artemis Quartet, and they collaborate here with a further Erato artist, the mezzo-soprano Marianne Crebassa, in a performance of the song ‘Ist es wahr?'” (amazon.com).

Piano Concerto No. 2, Études-tableaux, Op. 33, Rachmaninov. Performed by Boris Giltburg and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra.
“Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 2 is one of the most passionate and beloved concertos in the repertoire, its lyricism and virtuosity charting a trajectory from darkness through idyll to dazzling triumph. The Études-tableaux, Op. 33 are richly characterised musical evocations, expressive and often explosive, that reflect a more angular, modern aspect” (cover).

An Ode on the Death of Mr Henry Purcell, John Blow. Performed by Arcangelo + soloists.
“Jonathan Cohen and Arcangelo present an ideal album of music for connoisseurs of the English Baroque – and extraordinary singing. This wonderful recital of music by John Blow features a wide range of both vocal and instrumental music. Arcangelo once again demonstrate their versatility in repertoire that will be a real discovery for many” (amazon.com).

Coming very soon: Mahler 2 performed by the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra; Monteverdi’s Vespers 1610.

A selection of new Classical CD additions

This week’s classical selection is brought to you by the keyboard (at a bit of a stretch): a Saint-Saëns CD featuring both the organ and two pianos, a symphony composed by a virtuoso pianist, and a compilation of works performed on the tangent piano (a bit of a rarity).

Carnival of the Animals, Organ Symphony, Saint-Saëns. Performed by the Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Antonio Pappano.
“Saint-Saëns briefly paused work on his Third Symphony for a holiday in Austria, during which the whimsy of his Carnival of the Animals was born. Yet these two works – from the very same year in the composer’s life – could not be more different, and make a dramatic coupling showing two sides of a singular genius. Martha Argerich and Antonio Pappano celebrate an enduring friendship with this tribute, grand and tongue-in-cheek, to Saint-Saëns” (back cover).

Symphony No. 1, Rachmaninov. Performed live by the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy.
A live recording of Rachmaninov’s first symphony (composed when he was 22) performed last year at the Royal Festival Hall in London, this work is receiving rave reviews. Vladimir Ashkenazy, pianist and conductor extraordinaire, was recently interviewed by Presto Classical about the recording, and his thoughts on Rachmaninov and the Philharmonia Orchestra here.

Tangere, C.P.E. Bach. Performed by Alexei Lubimov.
“Russian pianist Alexei Lubimov is the rare artist who has been a trailblazer in two directions, both a champion of new music (from Cage to Silvestrov) and a dedicated interpreter of Baroque music with a passion for period instruments. In this remarkable reading of music by CPE Bach, Lubimov responds to the inventiveness of the composer’s fantasies, sonatas and rondos by making full creative use of the sonorities of the tangent piano. Briefly popular in the early 18th century, the tangent piano (whose strings are struck from beneath by wood or metal tangents and allowed to vibrate) offered greater expressiveness and intensity than the harpsichord” (amazon.com).

New Classical CDs

This week we highlight three similarly-themed titles, and a collection of Bach cantatas for solo voice (with a concerto for oboe d’amore guest-starring in the middle).

Sibelius. Performed by Leif Ove Andsnes.
Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes puts together a repertoire of not-often-heard Sibelius solo piano music. “‘Everyone was astonished that there could be a major composer out there with such beautiful, accessible music that people don’t know. These are intriguing works with the wonderful Sibelius qualities we know. I really believe in this music and I want people to hear it.’ Leif Ove Andsnes” (back cover).

Beethoven. Performed by Evgeny Kissin.
Presto Classical’s disc of the week for August the 25th. Recorded live over ten years between 2006 and 2016, this double-CD album presents some of Beethoven’s most well-known piano music – the Moonlight, Appassionata, and Les Adieux sonatas, plus the challenging no. 32. This is Kissin’s first solo recording in over a decade.

Ibert. Performed by the Orchestre de al Suisse Romande and Neeme Järvi.
“This fourth album from Neeme Jarvi and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande explores the music of Jacques Ibert. Although Iberts work is starkly contrasting from piece to piece, all of his compositions show his deftness with their strong melodic lines and vigorous ostinato patterns. These recordings were taken in Genevas Victoria Hall, and the outstanding acoustics are easily heard on this recording” (Amazon.com).

Cantatas for Bass, Johann Sebastian Bach. Performed by Matthias Goerne.
“In composing his cantatas for solo voice, Johann Sebastian Bach magisterially combined two elements that might seem irreconcilable: strict devotion within the framework of weekly Lutheran worship and vocal virtuosity, served by skilful highlighting of the voice. The result is a style in which the expression of the sacred Word is raised to a peak of intensity – notably when a voice like Matthias Goerne’s tackles these two famous cantatas for bass, giving them all the lustre of rare pearls!” (back cover).

Stravinsky on strings: New Classical CDs

This week we highlight an interesting selection of recent classical releases including some Baroque solo music performed on period instruments, Strauss Lieder, and a collection of works for violin and piano by Stravinsky, which is interesting in that Stravinsky claimed he wasn’t fond of the combination of strings and piano (according to Presto Classical).

Twelve Fantasias for Solo Flute, Telemann. Performed by Ashley Solomon.
“This recording offers the listener a rare opportunity to hear two unique baroque flutes, both made in 1760 alongside my favourite modern copy. In combining all three on this recording I hope it opens a new sound world for the listener and breathes fresh life into these well-known works by Telemann” (Ashley Solomon, on CD cover).

Piano Concertos Nos. 25 & 26, Mozart. Performed by Francesco Piemontesi and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra.
“Described as a ‘stellar Mozartian’ Francesco Piemontesi finds a perfect partner in the Scottish Chamber Orchestra whose impeccable credentials are widely acknowledge. Piemontesi has performed Mozart exclusively recently, including a critically acclaimed 2015 BBC Prom, a Mozart cycle at London’s Wigmore Hall which commenced in January, 2016 and continues in 2017 and Mozart concertos with the SCO. The Swiss pianist enjoys a particular insight into Mozart gaining a useful ‘love of detail’ from his teacher Alfred Brendel, who was himself renowned for his masterly interpretations of Mozart. This recording couples consecutive yet contrasting works from Mozart’s Vienna period: K.503 represents the longest and most substantial of his concert masterpieces and K.537 provides the soloist with an audience-pleasing cadenza. Conductor Andrew Manze, well-known as a HIP pioneer, shares Piemontesi’s approach to creating an authentic performance, making this somewhat of a Mozart dream team” (amazon.com).

Music for Violin, Volume 1, Stravinsky. Performed by Ilya Gringolts and Peter Laul.
This compilation is in large part a collection of works Stravinsky wrote for his violinist friend Samuel Dushkin, the idea being that Stravinsky and Dushkin would perform them together in recitals. Other works that feature are arrangements of some of pieces taken from some of Stravinsky’s more famous efforts, The Firebird, Petrushka for example. The CD rounds out with a Stravinsky arrangement of La Marseillaise written for solo violin.

Through Life and Love, Richard Strauss. Performed by Louise Alder.
“Hailed as ‘one of the brightest lyric-sopranos of the younger generation’… Louise has been held in high critical acclaim during her early career, and has recently been declared Young Singer of the Year at the 2017 International Opera Awards. She is also no stranger to Lieder, and has worked with pianist Joseph Middleton previously at the Leeds Lieder Festival. Joseph is considered a specialist in the art of song accompaniment… Through Life and Love sees Louise and Joseph perform some of the most beautiful Lieder in the repertoire, including Strauss’ ‘Die nacht, Standchen’ and ‘Rote Rosen’… (amazon.com).