Eavesdropping Underwater: an Interview with Olivia Price!

Why do scientists eavesdrop on whales and dolphins? What can recordings of whale and dolphin sounds tell us? How do you even record the sound that these creatures make? And what’s it like to go to Antarctica?

Join us on Saturday, May 25 at Te Papa for a FREE talk by NIWA scientists Dr Giacomo Giorli and Olivia Price to hear the answers!

As part of the build-up to Eavesdropping Underwater, we interviewed Olivia Price about her role as a Marine Physics Technician for NIWA.

Can you tell us a bit about your role at NIWA?

I work within a team of physical oceanography technicians to maintain, deploy and recover science equipment that records information about our oceans’ physical properties (i.e. temperature, salinity, oxygen). These properties can tell us a lot about ocean currents and features which provide food and the right kind of conditions for marine life to thrive.

You’re a Qualified PADI Dive Master. What does that entail? How deep have you dived?

I started with a PADI Open Water course in 2014 and have been hooked ever since! A Divemaster certification allows me to act as an assistant to a Dive Instructor and has taught me rescue diving skills. My Divemaster assessment was in Milford Sound, which was the best diving I have ever done! We dived alongside sheer underwater cliffs to 38m (PADI limits are 40m) and saw a very special black coral – that underwater looks white. These corals have been building their underwater forests in Milford for 200 million years.

You were part of a recent journey to the Antarctic onboard a NIWA research vessel. Can you tell us what living on board was like in those conditions?

NIWA’s flagship vessel, the Tangaroa is a multi-purpose research vessel designed to investigate New Zealand’s marine resources and environment. Inside the accommodation, you would never know you’re in Antarctica until you look out the window. It is toasty warm and the cooks aboard are known for their epic meals. With very limited internet/phone access and not seeing another ship for six weeks, it felt like our crew were completely isolated from the rest of the world. This isolation and extreme cold conditions meant we needed to prepare for any kind of emergency- so there was plenty of survival training before we left port and plenty of drills aboard. As we steamed south, each day got longer until we were experiencing 23 hours of daylight. Even then the sun didn’t fully set, instead skimming the horizon. This meant plenty of hours for whale watching and spotting icebergs!

As well as passive acoustic moorings, the “whale listening posts”, you also use physical oceanographic moorings & an ASL echosounder. Can you tell us the difference between these, what they measure and what you hope to achieve from the data recovered?

Passive acoustic moorings (PAM) take a bit of explaining, which will be easier to convey with pictures on Saturday. The physical oceanography moorings have a set of instrumentation on them recording physical properties (i.e. temperature, oxygen and salinity) that will help give an insight into how fresh water coming off the Ross Ice Shelf is interacting with our deep oceans. On the mooring is also some current meters that measure the strength and direction of water flow. The Ross Ice Shelf is particularly important as it is the largest freshwater reserve in Antarctica!
The ASL is an acoustic sounder that measures the amount of Antarctic krill in the water by sending and listening out for sound pings. These krill are a key food source for the Adelie Penguins that live on Cape Adare.

The voyage also focused on some of the tiniest organisms in the ocean – the phytoplankton and bacteria. Can you talk about how data on these is collected, and what it is for?

These amazing little organisms are collected using a CTD Rosette which has a bunch of bottles on it that allows us to collect water samples at different water depths. Several scientists worked hard to analyse phytoplankton and bacteria community structure across the Ross Sea. Although these organisms aren’t visible to our eyes, there are ridiculous amounts of them in the ocean and they are incredibly important. Phytoplankton produce around 70% of the air we breathe, I like to call them the humble trees of the ocean!

What was your favourite wildlife memory from your journey on the Tangaroa?

It is so hard to pick one as we saw a lot of beautiful animals! A moment I will never forget is when we reached the edge of the sea ice at dusk and saw multiple groups of Adelie penguins swimming and leaping into the ice for the night. I felt like I had jumped into a David Attenborough scene.

For more insights into Olivia’s work, join us at Eavesdropping Underwater: the Sounds of Whales and Dolphins on Saturday, May 25 at Te Papa!

Eavesdropping Underwater: an Interview with Giacomo Giorli!

Why do scientists eavesdrop on whales and dolphins? What can recordings of whale and dolphin sounds tell us? How do you even record the sound that these creatures make? And what’s it like to go to Antarctica?

Join us on Saturday, May 25 at Te Papa for a FREE talk by NIWA scientists Dr Giacomo Giorli and Olivia Price to hear the answers!

As part of the build-up to Eavesdropping Underwater, we interviewed Dr Giacomo Giorli about his role as a marine mammal acoustician. Dr Giorli’s work has taken him around the world, from studying dolphins in the Ligurian Sea to investigating predator-prey relationships in the waters of Hawaii. He has continued this work at NIWA, including involvement in a pioneering underwater sound project that recently gained national headlines.

What first drew you to oceanography?

Curiosity. I grew up close to the sea, and I was just curious about it.

What makes you most excited in your current job at NIWA?

The possibility to study many species in the Southern Ocean that we know almost nothing about, and the incredible amount of technology that we have at NIWA to conduct research.

You recently discovered clicks from unknown beaked whales in the Cook Strait. What would you like to do next to follow up this research?

That work was the result of a study conducted by all the researchers that authored the paper, and not just my “discovery”. It was a collaborative work. One important thing to note is that we did not discover unknown or new species of beaked whales (as many people always think). We recorded echolocation signals from beaked whales in Cook Strait that were not previously described in literature. We know the signals are from beaked whales, but we do not know what species of beaked whales are producing them. I guess a natural follow up to this research would be to identify the species that are using these sounds.

You’ve also studied the foraging behaviours of sperm whales and other toothed whales in Hawaii. What was it like completing this research, and what were the results?

That research is far from completed. In reality what I was studying in Hawaii was just the tip of the iceberg of deep sea predator-prey studies involving deep diving toothed whales. The toothed whale species studied in that research are species that dive very deep to search for food. They can dive deeper than 1 km. Because of this, it is essentially impossible to observe their behaviour directly. One can go in the African savanna and observe predator behaviour directly. Think about cheetahs hunting. We all are familiar with videos of cheetahs chasing impalas. What I want to point out is that when you have to deal with working in the deep ocean in general, making observations is incredibly challenging. We face the problem of observing how deep sea prey drives the distribution and behaviour of their predators.

In Hawaii, I tested new acoustic technology that would allow researchers to understand how prey availability and type could influence the behaviour of the deep diving predators (toothed whales). Data indicated that sperm whales, for example, foraged more where they had chances of finding larger prey, rather than where they had chances to find more prey. It seems counter-intuitive that they would rather go in a place where there is less potential prey. It suggests that these predators are somehow picky in choosing their prey.

As well as whales, your work also involves recording sounds from creatures as tiny as marine algae. What are the similarities and differences in working at these different scales?

The research I did on algae with my colleagues in the U.S. was a laboratory experiment. We did not go to sea. Algae do not have a sound generator like vocal cords. The sound is produced by oxygen bubbles that are expelled from the algal tissue during photosynthesis. However, the signal processing techniques we used to analyse the acoustic data are pretty much the same used for cetacean bio-acoustics research.

If money wasn’t a problem, what would be your ideal research project?

I guess the ideal research project in Marine Sciences is the one that ends well without failures of instrumentations and other things that can go wrong at sea.

For more insights into Dr Giorli’s work, join us at Eavesdropping Underwater: the Sounds of Whales and Dolphins on Saturday, May 25 at Te Papa!

Eavesdropping Underwater: the sounds of whales and dolphins

Wellington City Libraries and NIWA present a free public talk about the sounds of whales and dolphins and life on the high seas aboard the RV Tangaroa.

Why do scientists eavesdrop on whales and dolphins?

What can recordings of whale and dolphin sounds tell us?

How do you even record the sound that these creatures make?

And what’s it like to go to Antarctica?

Image courtesy of NIWA

Join us on Saturday, May 25 at Te Papa for a FREE talk by NIWA scientists Dr Giacomo Giorli and Olivia Price to hear the answers!

The scientists will take you on a journey exploring the science of marine acoustics, the sounds of whales and dolphins and the chilly business of researching in Antarctica.

 
Image courtesy of NIWA

Dr Giacomo Giorli is a marine mammal acoustician at NIWA. Dr Giorli studies marine acoustics to understand the ecology, distribution and habitat selection of marine mammals.

Olivia Price is a marine physics technician at NIWA. She constructs the scientific equipment needed to study our oceans.

 

To get more of a taste of what Giacomo and Olivia are involved with read this article in Stuff about whale sounds and click here to read about the RV Tangaroa and take a virtual tour.

Click here to find out more about whales and dolphins on our fascinating Gale Interactive: Science database. You will need your library card to follow this link.

Join us on Saturday, 25 May at 2pm at the Rangimarie Rooms, Level 3, Te Papa to hear Giacomo and Oivia discuss their fascinating work at NIWA!

ComicFest 2019: That’s a Wrap!

This year was the fourth time Wellington City Libraries has put together an extravaganza celebrating comics and cartoons in all their forms. With the closure of the Central Library, the National Library of New Zealand came to the rescue, hosting the festival for three extremely busy days from the 2nd to the 4th of May. The festival continues to build on its past successes, this year featuring a veritable pantheon of New Zealand comic greats for panel discussions, workshops, drawing demonstrations, book signings, and exhibitions. Thousands of Free Comic Book Day books were given away to the record number of comic enthusiasts who turned up to share in the chaos and fun of ComicFest 2019.

We would like to acknowledge the generosity of our sponsors, including New Zealand Book Council, Graphic Comics, the New Zealand Cartoon Archive, Creative New Zealand, CoNZealand: the 78th World Science Fiction Convention, Penguin Books, Unity Books, Weta Workshop, and of course the National Library of New Zealand/Alexander Turnbull Library.

To relive the awesomeness, check out our Facebook album of photos from the festivities on Saturday the 4th of May.

We also had over 130 entries to our “Can You Comicify That?” drawing competition! Entrants were given the task of drawing a ‘comicified’ version of their favourite character from a book, movie or TV show, or a person in real life. Check out the galleries below to see the prizewinners for each age category!

8-and-under

9-13

14+

Congratulations to everyone who took part in the drawing competition, and a huge thanks to everyone who came to ComicFest 2019. We hope you enjoyed it as much as we did!

If you missed ComicFest 2019, or would love to see the panel discussions and presentations again, check our playlist on Youtube:

You can also get them as podcasts:





Urban adventures: experience VR this Thursday & Friday

Experience virtual reality in your lunch break–or before your bus home!

Ever wanted to fly a car through dystopian Los Angeles? Or come face-to-face with a Demogorgon on the set of Stranger Things? Maybe you’d prefer to free-climb El Capitan, or dive down into the Mariana Trench?

All these things are possible at our fantastic – and free! – virtual reality experience. Bookings are essential as space is limited.

Book your session

Details

Thursday 16 and Friday 17 May

Committee Room Two (Ground Floor, next to Citizens’ Advice Bureau)
101 Wakefield Street
(Wellington City Council building)

Each session is 20 minutes and multiple slots are available in each session.

If you have any other questions, please contact enquiries@wcl.govt.nz. And for a sneak peek at what’s available, check out our previews of some of the VR experiences below!

Selected Available Experiences

Blade Runner 2049: Replicant Pursuit
“When a rogue replicant kills two people it’s up to you, a Blade Runner, to run him down. Experience the vast cityscape of Los Angeles in the year 2049 from the skies as you pilot your spinner in a thrilling chase set in the Blade Runner universe.”

Coco: VR
Coco VR is Pixar’s stunning debut into virtual reality: an adventure into the beautiful Disney-Pixar film, Coco. You can choose either a single or multi-player experience, and follow the magical alebrije into the luminous world of Coco filled with lovable characters and beautiful settings from the film.”

National Geographic: Free Solo
“Immerse yourself in the experience of free solo climbing Yosemite’s famous El Capitan alongside Alex Honnold in this breathtaking 360 video.”

Face Your Fears
Face Your Fears will scare you, creep you out, or cause your jaw to drop in awe and amazement. Try looking around, looking up, looking behind you. You never know what’s lurking in the dark. Share the experience with your friends! It’s even more fun to watch them scream and jump!”

theBlu
theBlu is a deeply immersive VR series that allows audiences to experience the wonder and majesty of the ocean through different habitats and come face to face with some of the most awe inspiring species on the planet.”

Nominated Hugo graphic novels

This week, we’re looking at CoNZealand, the 78th World Science Fiction Convention, which is being held right here in Wellington next year. The annual event, known more generally as WorldCon, is one of the world’s most prestigious science fiction conventions, and is also home to the legendary Hugo Awards. Run entirely by fans, Worldcons offer an exciting experience with a unique mix of fans and professionals from all walks of life and all corners of the Earth.

Next year’s CoNZealand has already confirmed two Author Guests of Honour, Mercedes Lackey and Larry Dixon, along with a New Zealand Guest of Honour, local author and illustrator Greg Broadmore, and a Fan Guest of Honour, Rose Mitchell from Australia. Their Toastmaster is none other than George RR Martin, author of the hugely popular Game of Thrones novels now turned into a TV series. To hear more about CoNZealand and how you can be a part of it check them out at conzealand.nz.

Speaking of Hugo Awards, the 2019 finalists have just been announced, including best Graphic Story of the year. Check out the stunning selection of finalists below. All of these graphic story titles are available to borrow free from our branches . Enjoy.

This years Hugo nominees for Best Graphic Story

Abbott / Ahmed, Saladin
“While investigating police brutality and corruption in 1970s Detroit, journalist Elena Abbott uncovers supernatural forces being controlled by a secret society of the city’s elite. In the uncertain social and political climate of 1972 Detroit, hard-nosed, chain-smoking tabloid reporter Elena Abbott investigates a series of grisly crimes that the police have ignored. Crimes she knows to be the work of dark occult forces. Forces that took her husband from her. Forces she has sworn to destroy.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Black Panther : long live the king / Okorafor, Nnedi
“As the Black Panther and an Avenger, T’Challa has had to save the world time and again – but those duties pale in comparison to his responsibilities as king of Wakanda.” (Catalogue)

Monstress. Volume three, Haven / Liu, Marjorie M
“Maika has spent most of her life learning how to fight, but how will she fare when the only way to save her life…is to make friends? Collects issues 13-18 of the Hugo Award and British Fantasy Award series.” (Catalogue)

On a sunbeam / Walden, Tillie
” On a Sunbeam is an epic graphic novel about a girl who travels to the ends of the universe to find a long lost love, from acclaimed author Tillie Walden. Two timelines. Second chances. One love. A ragtag crew travels to the deepest reaches of space, rebuilding beautiful, broken structures to piece the past together. Two girls meet in boarding school and fall deeply in love–only to learn the pain of loss. With interwoven timelines and stunning art, award-winning graphic novelist Tillie Walden creates an inventive world, breathtaking romance, and an epic quest for love.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Paper girls. 4 / Vaughan, Brian K
“The continuing story of newspaper deliverers Erin, Mac, KJ and Tiffany, as they time travel from prehistoric times to the year 2000.” (Catalogue)

Saga. Volume nine / Vaughan, Brian K
“After the traumatic events of the War for Phang, Hazel, her parents, and their surviving companions embark on a life-changing adventure at the westernmost edge of the universe.”–Provided by publisher.” (Catalogue)

Tiriti Talks: Morgan Godfery — Te Arawhiti / Māori Crown Relations and the Tiriti

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the third of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  14 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Morgan Godfery

Morgan Godfery has whakapapa links to Te Pahipoto hapū of Ngāti Awa, and Lalomanu of Hāmoa/Samoa.  He is a political writer (but not a member of any political party).

His strong commitment to issues affecting Māori has driven his weekly/daily  comments  on social media via his twitter account and e-Tangata. An earlier focus of his writing was his blog, Maui Street.

Although the blog is now inactive, there is an impressive list of his published work there.

Read Morgan Godfery on Bridget Williams Books

You can read two of Morgan’s works online — Māui Street and The Interregnum — through our Bridget Williams Books Text Collection subscription (log in with your library card at the links below to start reading):

Māui Street / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“Morgan Godfery is one of New Zealand’s most energising young thinkers. In just a few years he has become a leading voice in the country’s social and political life. Starting out under his own banner, ‘Māui Street’, his writing now appears across national and international publications. This curated selection brings together the best of Godfery’s writing. Read together, the collection charts the emergence of a significant New Zealand voice.” (Bridget Williams Books)

The Interregnum / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“In BWB’s latest book of essays, edited by Morgan Godfery, ten of New Zealand’s sharpest emerging thinkers gather to debate the ‘morbid symptoms’ of the current moment, from precarious work to climate change, and to discuss what shape change might take, from ‘the politics of love’ to postcapitalism”. The Interregnum interrogates the future from the perspective of the generation who will shape it.” (Bridget Williams Books)

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Tiriti Talks: Jen Margaret – The State of the Pākehā Nation

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the second of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  7 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Jen Margaret

Jen Margaret is a Te Tiriti educator who devotes her time to working with individuals and organisations to deepen our understanding and application of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Her kōrero in this Te Tiriti talk series is based on the State of the Pākehā Nation essay commissioned for Waitangi Day 2018, entitled Ka pū te ruha, ka hao te rangatahi: change in the Pākehā nation. It explores the necessity to unravel privilege, racism and colonisation, and suggests ways in which Pākehā might work to do so.

Jen’s work is guided by the whakataukī : “Ko koe ki tēnā, ko ahau ki tēnēi I kīiwai o te kete”

This whakataukī has been adopted to convey the differing roles and responsibilities for Tangata Tiriti and Tangata Whenua within the Treaty relationship.

Jen has published the following resources which are listed on her website:

Working as allies, non-indigenous supporters of indigenous justice in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngā Rerenga o Te Tiriti provides guidance to groups and organisations within the community sector regarding engaging with the Treaty of Waitangi.

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

ComicFest 2019: Comic Book Festival from May 2 – 4 at the National Library

Call comics what you like – sequential art, graphic novels, cartoons, manga – Wellington City Libraries loves everything about this expressive, influential, diverse medium. Our fourth celebration of comics, and local cartoonists, ComicFest 2019, is ready to kick off on May 2 – 4, at the National Library, 70 Molesworth St!

ComicFest 2019 interviews & more

With the recent closure of the Central library, the National Library have come to the rescue with a generous, well-timed offer to co-sponsor and house ComicFest in the Te Ahumairangi Foyer, Taiwhanga Kauhau Auditorium, and programme rooms on the corner of Molesworth and Aitken Streets.

Once again, ComicFest will be giving away 1,000’s of free comics on Free Comic Book Day, with the brilliant support of Graphic comic store, who will be providing local sales of cartoonists on the day for the first time.

We couldn’t have staged ComicFest without our all-important sponsors – the National Library, Graphic comics, Creative New Zealand, the New Zealand Book Council, the New Zealand Cartoon Archive, Weta Workshop, CoNZealand, Penguin Books, Unity Books and Wellington Zinefest

For more information on all the events at ComicFest, scroll further down the page for our complete programme, but expect FREE comics, panel discussions, presentations, workshops, Kids cosplay, quizzes, film showings and prizes from Weta Cave, Unity Books and CoNZealand!


Saturday – 4 May Programme

For all 3 days scroll further down


 


Full ComicFest 2019 Programme


Thursday 2 May

6:00pm – 8:00pm | Mystery ComicFest Film

Can you guess this classic Science Fiction film? Help us celebrate the start of ComicFest with one of the most beloved science fiction films of the 1980’s, based on a pulp classic novel and comic strip, and boasting a killer soundtrack! Please fill in the form to book a seat at this limited entry, free event. (Programme rooms)

Friday 3 May

5:30pm – 6:30pm | ComicFest Star Wars Quiz Night

Is the force with you? Are you are Star Wars mega brain, or are you a Padawan rather than a Jedi Master? Put your knowledge of the Star Wars universe to the test, in our very special Star War’s quiz. Join in groups of up to 5, and fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event. Fabulous prizes provided by CoNZealand! (Tiakiwai Seminar Rooms)

Sponsored by CoNZealand, 78th World Science Fiction Convention.

6:45pm – 8:45pm | Roger Langridge – A Career in Comics (Presentation and Workshop)

Eisner winning, London-based cartoonist, Roger Langridge has worked for major and independent comics publishers across the world and is visiting Wellington as part of ComicFest 2019! Roger will provide a presentation on his career in cartooning, with examples of his highly regarded comics. Join in later, as Roger provides the chance for all to create a unique and creative comic strip of their own, based on formal constraints provided at random!

Please fill in the form to reserve a place for the Presentation for this limited entry, free event.

If you would like to go to the Workshop, fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event.

(Auditorium / Tiakiwai Seminar Rooms)

Sponsored by Creative New Zealand

Saturday 4 May

All Day | Free Comic Book Day | CoNZealand Area | Drawing competition|

(Te Ahumairangi Foyer)

9:00am onwards | Free Comic Book Day

Grab some free comics from us and chat comics with our librarians at the National Library! Comics from all different publishers and for all age ranges are included in the selections, so there will be something for everyone. Thanks to Graphic for providing free comics, and book sales of local cartoonists on the day!

Sponsored by Graphic comics

CoNZealand, 78th World Science Fiction Convention Area

Come and talk to the crew of CoNZealand, the 78th World Science Fiction Convention, and find out how you can join in the fun between 29 July and 2 August 2020, when SF and Fantasy authors from all over the world, including Mercedes Lackey, Larry Dixon and George R.R. Martin, will land right here in Wellington.

Drawing Competition: Can You Comicify That?

Come to the library and draw a ‘comicified’ version of your favourite character from a book, movie or TV show! Submit it to our drawing competition and be in to win a bunch of awesome prizes, or bring it to the Zine Crafting Table and learn how to turn it into your very own homemade comic! Entry forms available from the National Library during ComicFest. All ages and drawing levels welcome.

9:00am – 10:00am | Tea Dragon Workshop with Katie O’Neill (Workshop)

Kids (and big kids!) are welcome to join author of The Tea Dragon series Katie O’Neill in creating some new species of Tea Dragons based on suggestions from the audience. Feathers or scales? Wings or horns? And most importantly, what type of tea will they be? There will also be a demonstration by Katie of how she creates the colourful pages of her graphic novels. (Programme Rooms)

Sponsored by The New Zealand Book Council

10:00am – 10:30am | Kids Cosplay!

It’s May the fourth, so here’s your chance to dress up as your favourite Jedi, Robot or Sith Lord! Or come along as your favourite comic’s character to get lots of spot prizes, free comics from Unity books or a Weta Cave Workshop tour pass! Limited to children up to the age of 12, free entry. No weapons, or military cosplay please. (Te Ahumairangi Foyer)

Sponsored by Unity Books

10:30am – 11:30am | Comics Masterclass with Ant Sang (Workshop)

Join cartoonist creator, Ant Sang, of award-winning comic Shaolin Burning, and recently released graphic novel Helen and the Go-Go Ninjas, for a workshop covering some of the fundamentals of comic storytelling. Should I use a close-up or wide shot? Big or small panel? How do I make a story that readers can’t put down?! All these questions will be answered, and more… Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event. (Programme Rooms)

Sponsored by Penguin Books

11:30am -12:30pm | The Future of Storytelling : A Look Inside the Art of Dr Grordbort’s Invaders (Presentation)

Did you know that Weta Workshop develops mixed reality games? Using the comic books of Dr. Grordbort’s, their gaming studio released Dr. Grordbort’s Invaders, available exclusively on Magic Leap. Weta Workshop’s Senior Artist, Jesse Barrett, delves into the challenges of expressing the world of Dr. Grordbort’s in a whole new medium and the solutions they uncovered while working within mixed reality. Learn which key elements Weta Workshop’s artists look for when translating from one medium to another and how to retain the vibe of an original source material. Attend this presentation and be in with a chance of winning a Weta Cave Workshop Tour pass. Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event. (Taiwhanga Kauhau Auditorium)

Sponsored by Weta Workshop

12:40pm -1:40pm | The Ascent of Children’s Comics (Panel Discussion)

There are more amazing comics made for children’s and young adult audiences than ever, aimed at diverse audiences across every age group. Join Eisner award winning cartoonists, Roger Langridge and Katie O’Neill, New Zealand Post Book Award Winning author, Ant Sang, Giselle Clarkson from, ‘The Sapling,’ and cartoonist-chair Sarah Laing, as they discuss the growing phenomena of children’s and young adult comics internationally, and in New Zealand. Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event. (Taiwhanga Kauhau Auditorium)

12:40pm -1:40pm| Comic Zine Crafting Table (Workshop)

Want to learn how to make and publish your own homemade comics? Check out some of the comic zines from the Wellington City Library zine collection made by local comic artists, and learn how to make your own with the volunteers of Wellington Zinefest at our crafting table. All ages welcome. Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event.

1:50pm – 2:35pm | Digital Comics Demo with Michel Mulipola (Presentation)

Join comic book artist and illustrator Michel Mulipola, as he demonstrates digital tools whilst drawing live (and live streaming) on the big screen! Bring pen and paper, and join in with Michel as he provides story-telling tips, panel composition ideas and illustration guidance. All welcome! Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event.  (Taiwhanga Kauhau Auditorium)

Sponsored by Wellington City Libraries

2:45PM – 3:45PM | Stories from Aotearoa / New Zealand (Panel Discussion)

What is a New Zealand comic (and who’s reading them)? How do we foster and celebrate diversity in comics? What stories aren’t being told? And what can we learn from New Zealand’s cartooning history? Join Jem Yoshioka, Paul Diamond, Alex Cara and Ross Murray to hear their perspectives on New Zealand cartooning in 2019. Discussion chaired by Hannah Benbow, cartoon and comics librarian at the National Library, Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa. Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event. (Taiwhanga Kauhau Auditorium)

Sponsored by the New Zealand Cartoon Archive

3:55pm -4:55pm | Perspectives on the Cartooning Life (Panel Discussion)

The physical and digital world of comics creation and publishing has changed massively in recent years. What are the ways a cartoonist can succeed, and sustain a modern career in comics and cartoons? Join award-winning cartoonists, Sharon Murdoch, Michel Mulipola, Roger Langridge, and chair Dylan Horrocks as they discuss their brilliant careers, comics today and their views on the future of cartooning. Please fill in the form to reserve a place at this limited entry, free event. (Taiwhanga Kauhau Auditorium)

Sponsored by Creative New Zealand

Motu Kairangi – A free lunchtime kōrero

Nau mai, haere mai

Wellington City Libraries presents a free lunchtime kōrero about the history of Te Motu Kairangi (The Miramar peninsula).

WATTS PENINSULA: Public walking trails will be established and Fort Ballance will be restored.

The Speaker Morrie Love will mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Te Whanganui-a-Tara, on the 29th April 1840 in his kōrero of Te Motu Kairangi.

Date: Monday 29th April

Place: St Andrew’s Conference Centre, Hall (access to the right of the St Andrew’s on the Terrace building)

Time:  12:30 – 1:15pm

Enquiries to ann.reweti@wcc.govt.nz

One version of the story of the settlement of the eastern shores of Te Whanaganui-a-Tara by Ngāi Tara, Ngāti Itra is told by Elsdon Best in The land of Tara – we have this digitised version  on our Māori Resource page.

The migrations of iwi and hapū from the East Coast – the stories of Ngāti Porou / Ngāti Kahungunu are a complex acount of journeys, fighting and intermarriage.  “Ngāti Kahungunu” was the blanket label given to the eastern tribes by Te Atiawa as the Taranaki iwi sought to plant their foothold on the western shores and the inner harbour between 1820s and 1840s – up to the arrival of the New Zealand Company and its first six ships of immigrants in 1839-1840.

You can also check out our Te Whanganui-a-Tara index of Māori history and here are some eBooks from our catalogue on ‘Te Tirit o Waitangi’.

The Treaty of Waitangi / Orange, Claudia
“Since its publication in 1987, Claudia Orange’s book has become the standard guide to one of the key documents in New Zealand history, selling over 40,000 copies. The complexities of the Treaty, which have done so much to shape New Zealand history for nearly 200 years, are thoughtfully explored as Orange examines the meanings the document has held for Māori and Pākehā. A new introduction brings it up to date with all that has happened since, complementing the book’s lucid and well-researched exploration of how and why the Treaty was signed.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi [electronic resource] / Calman, Ross
“The book’s first two parts consider how the Christian word was spread and how Maori responded, explaining the identification they felt with the Israelites of the Old Testament. The third part relates the rise of indigenous religious movements, from the early Papahurihia through Pai Marire, Ringatu and the Parihaka Movement, and the later incarnations of the Arowhenua Movement in the South Island and what remains today’s leading Maori church, Ratana.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi settlements
“The settlement of iwi claims under the Treaty of Waitangi has drawn international attention, as other nations seek ways to build new relationships between indigenous peoples and the state. Here leading scholars consider the impact of Treaty settlements on the management and ownership of key resources (lands, forests and fisheries); they look at the economic and social consequences for Māori, and the impact of the settlement process on Crown–Māori relationships. And they ask ‘how successful has the settlement process been?'” (Catalogue)

The story of a treaty / Orange, Claudia
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)