Come along to hear Helen Brown talking about her playful cat called Bono!

Come along to hear about Bono, a rescued cat with magnetic eyes, who changed the lives of a family. This is the story of a cat with sweet but nervous attitude and a tragic background, who inspired the community. When Helen was invited to visit New York, she was faced with an unexpected request. To her surprise, she was asked to take care of Bono, a homeless cat with sweet but nervous attitude. And, there was more… Bono had lots of energy, was clever and unpredictable and with an attitude.

Helen and Bono developed an amazing relationship full of challenges and surprises. It’s a funny and insightful story, celebrating life, love and new beginnings…

Helen Brown will give a brief talk about her book, followed by a reading and will respond to invited questions from the audience.

Tuesday, 16 October 2018 – 6:30pm at the Wellington Central library

Ground Floor – Young Adult Area

Read before you crawl… Fiction Choices

The excitement is building as LitCrawl is almost upon us! But before we get to the main event, and to get you prepared and in the mood, we have selected just a few titles from some of the many fantastic fiction luminaries appearing at this years event. Make sure you check out this year’s programme and start planning your crawl! We just can’t wait! Enjoy!

The blue / McCallum, Mary
“Lilian lives in an isolated island community at the mouth of Tory Channel trying to make the best of a life that has at its core a secret grief. It is 1938 and for three months of every year the men take to the sea to hunt whales with fast boats and explosive harpoons. This year, the whales aren’t the only ones returning – Lilian’s troubled son Micky has come home too. In this rugged, unsettled world, things are not always what they seem.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Dreamquake / Knox, Elizabeth
“Following on from the mesmerising Dreamhunter, the story continues dramatically as Grace, ‘overdreamt’ by Laura, introduces a nightmare, instead of the happy holiday dream programmed, to a packed Opera House audience, with chaotic results. Laura has collected and dreamt the nightmare in response to a letter she thinks is from her dead father, Tziga, who has been forced by the government to dream it to keep prisoners frightened and subdued.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Baby / Jochems, Annaleese
“Cynthia is twenty-one, bored and desperately waiting for something big to happen when her bootcamp instructor, the striking Anahera, suggests they run away together. With stolen money and a dog in tow they buy ‘Baby’, an old boat docked in the Bay of Islands, where Cynthia dreams they will live in a state of love. But there’s an intruder waiting to upset Cynthia’s plans and when a trip to an island utopia goes horribly wrong, a rot sets in on their relationship.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Dead people’s music : a novel / Laing, Sarah
“Classical is karaoke – just playing covers of dead people’s music – or so Wellingtonian Rebecca concluded at her London conservatorium. She’s sabotaged her scholarship there, but wants to keep playing the cello, like her grandmother, Klara. Now unmoored from her classical training, she’s in New York City, where Klara grew up. As Rebecca investigates her Jewish-refugee heritage, she starts to compose her own songs, but has to contend with diabetes and other burning issues: is she with the right man, or should she swap stability for lust? And how much longer can she live with a neurotic, junk-scavenging flatmate, on the verge of murdering another zebra fish?” (Catalogue)

I’m working on a building / Adam, Pip
“Everything becomes clearer in reverse – because sometimes, things have to be taken apart to be understood. In the near future, an exact replica of the world’s tallest tower, Dubai’s Burj al Khalifa, is being built on New Zealand’s West Coast. It’s an exercise in economic stimulation and national confidence-building after a run of natural and financial disasters. Catherine is the engineer in charge of making sure it all works. She feels there is something wrong in the plans. Or is there something wrong in her? I’m working on a building follows Catherine from the top of the tower to a geodesic dome in a park in London; from the Grand Lisboa in Macau to student accommodation in Wellington; from a South Auckland theme park to the Pompidou Centre; to reveal the way chance events can undo the best efforts of human beings to plan and build their lives and worlds.” (Catalogue)

All our secrets / Lane, Jennifer
“A girl called Gracie. A small town called Coongahoola with the dark Bagooli River running through it. The Bleeders – hundreds of ‘Believers’ who set up on the banks of the river, who start to buy up the town and win souls. The River Children – born in the aftermath of the infamous River Picnic. They begin to go missing, one after another. Gracie Barrett is the naively savvy spokesperson for her chaotic family (promiscuous dad, angry mum, twins Lucky and Grub, Elijah the River Child and fervent, prayerful Grandma Bett), for the kids who are taken, for the lurking fear that locks down the town and puts everyone under suspicion.” (Adapted from catalogue)

Fishing for Māui / Ritchie, Isa Pearl
“A novel about food, whānau, and mental illness. Valerie reads George Eliot to get to sleep just to take her mind off worries over her patients, her children, their father and the next family dinner. Elena is so obsessed with health, traditional food, her pregnancy and her blog she doesn’t notice that her partner, Malcolm the ethicist, is getting himself into a moral dilemma of his own making. Evie wants to save the world one chicken at a time. Meanwhile her boyfriend, Michael is on a quest to reconnect with his Māori heritage and discover his own identity. Rosa is eight years old and lost in her own fantasy world, but shes the only one who can tell somethings not right. Crisis has the power to bring this family together, but will it be too late?” (Catalogue)

Fosterling / Neale, Emma
“A young man is found unconscious in a remote forest. He is over seven feet tall, his skin covered in thick hair which reminds onlookers of an animal’s pelt. A compelling story about society and our reactions to difference, convincingly evoked, beautifully written.” (Catalogue)

Chinese Language Week Events at Wellington City Libraries!

Come along to the popular Chinese culture and language events during New Zealand Chinese Language Week! Experience Chinese culture with our programme of free events, including brilliant dance and music performances, hosted by Central Library and Newtown Library.

You can also get a free tangram game from any of our libraries.
2018年 新西兰中文周,请点击阅读

Tai Chi Demonstration, Newtown Library: 11:00-11:30am, 29 September

Celebrate Chinese Language Week, in the whānau (family) area at Newtown Library, by practicing peaceful movement with us.

Dance and opera performance, Central Library: 11:00am-12:00 pm, 29 September

Enjoy a snapshot of Chinese culture and history through artistically presented dance, music, songs, martial arts, and calligraphy performances. A wonderful show all will enjoy! Brought to you by the New Zealand Chinese Culture & Art Association.

Chinese language lesson, Central Library 1:00-2:00 pm, 29 September

Take this perfect opportunity to learn Chinese from an experienced teacher from the China Cultural Centre in New Zealand. You will learn basic communication words and essential greetings and phrases. Plus, you will access the librarian’s recommended books and resources for you to continue your language journey after the class.

Manawa Ora Childrens Choir, Newtown Library: 2:00-3:00 pm, 29 September

Come along and sing songs from all over the world with the Manawa Ora children’s choir! This is an interactive performance for all ages.

Dance and music performance, Central Library: 2:00-3:00 pm, 29 September,by Wellington Chinese Language School

Enjoy the creative dance and music performance combining traditional with contemporary dance and music. Brought to you by the Wellington Chinese Language School.

Chinese Story Times for Children
Come along to the Central Library for a storytime in Mandarin!

Chinese (Mandarin) story times, Central Library: 10:30-11:00 am, Thursday 27 September.

Read Chinese magazines online with Wellington City Libraries DragonSource database 

Read thousands of Chinese magazines on your laptop or phone! Phoenix Weekly, Readers, San Lian life magazine, and many more are available to access with your library card.

Read Chinese newspapers and books online
Discover Chinese cooking, classic and contemporary literature, and latest news, online via PressReader , the New York Times (Chinese language version), and  Chinese eBooks via Overdrive. All for free with your library card!

Dance your socks off in the school holidays!

Looking forward to the holidays? So are we! There are heaps of great activities planned for you. Here’s the low down…

Royal New Zealand Ballet Dance Workshops

Inspired by The Nutcracker these 45 minute sessions give children, aged 5-8 years, a chance to dance!  Places are limited so register early for these popular workshops at the RNZB website

Tawa Community Centre: 2nd October 10 – 10.45am

Newlands Community Centre: 2nd October 2 – 2.45pm

Wellington Central Library: 3 October 10 – 10.45am (This Workshop Is Full)

Island Bay Community Centre: 4 October 10 – 10.45am

 

Diorama Workshop and Competition

Be in to win a family pass to the RNZB’s The Nutcracker Season! Work together with your friends & family and recreate your favourite scene from The Nutcracker in a shoebox diorama. Bring your own shoebox and use our craft supplies. These workshops are open to families with children of all ages. Bookings are required for these workshops, please contact the host library to register.

Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library: 2nd October 10.30 – 11.30am

Wadestown Library: 2nd October 11am – 12pm

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: 2nd October 2.30 – 3.30pm

Karori Library: 3rd October 2.30 – 3.30pm

Wellington Central Library: 10th October 11am – 12pm (Bookings not required)

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: 10th October 2 – 3pm (Bookings not required)

Brooklyn Library: 11th October 11am – 12pm

Khandallah Library: 11th October 11am – 12pm

Johnsonville Library: 11th October 2 – 3pm (Bookings not required)

 

Family Movies

Bring a blanket and pillow, and relax at our fun family movies. A different G rated movie from the library collection will be showing each time, and are suitable for the whole family.  Ideal for children aged 4+ years accompanied by their caregivers. Bookings required for the evening movies at Johnsonville, Newtown, and Karori Libraries.

Wellington Central Library: 1st – 12th October, at 2pm in the children’s section (no movie showing on 7th October)

Johnsonville Library: 5th October 5.30 – 7pm (Reserve your place by contacting the event library)

Newtown Library: 5th October 6 – 7.30pm (Reserve your place by contacting the event library)

Karori Library: 11th October 6 – 7.30pm (Reserve your place by contacting the event library)

 

Let’s Go lego

At Let’s Go Lego, your creative skills will be put to the test as you use our Lego collections to design and build your masterpieces. Each session will have a different theme that will inspire you to hone your skills and become your very own Lego Legend. Bookings not required. Suitable for children aged 5+ years accompanied by their caregivers.

Wadestown Library: 2nd October 11am – 12pm

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: 4th October 3.30 – 4.30pm

Khandallah Library: 5th October 3.30 – 4.30pm

Karori Library: 6th October 2 – 3pm

Tawa Community Centre: 8th October 10am – 12pm

Miramar Library: 10th October 10.30 – 11.30am

Tawa Library: 11th October 3.30 – 4.30pm

Island Bay Community Centre: 12th October 10.30 – 11.30am

Johnsonville Library: 12th October 3.30 – 4.30pm

Newtown Library: 13th October 10.30 – 11.30am

 

Storytelling and Puppet Making

Come and listen to the story of The Nutcracker and be transported into the enchanting world of the Sugar Plum Fairy and the Mouse King. Followed by a fantastical puppet making workshop where you will create your own magical puppets to tell a story! Suitable for children aged 4+ years accompanied by their caregivers.

Newlands Community Centre: 9th October 2 – 3.30pm

 

Gamesfest

Bring your own, or use the board games supplied, and challenge yourself and your friends to victory. Aim for a Scrabble high score, show your hand or perhaps perfect your poker face in your favourite card game! Suitable for children aged 6+ years accompanied by their caregivers.

Central Library: 3rd and 10th October 5.30 – 8pm

 

Stories @ Six

Come along for a fun family story evening run by the community for the community. Bring the family and enter into a magical time of stories and fantasy. Stories @ Six is ideal for families with children aged 4+ years.

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: 4th October 6 – 6.30pm

 

Beyblade Tournament

Let the battle of the Beyblades begin! Bring your own Beyblades or use the library ones, and challenge your friends to a battle. Who will emerge victorious? Suitable for children aged 6+ years accompanied by their caregivers.

Newtown Library: 4th October 3 – 4pm

Lego Stop-Motion Movie Workshop

Work as a team and learn how to create a stop motion film using ‘Stop Motion Studio’ and LEGO. BYOD tablet, or borrow one of the library ones (limited supply available). Reserve your place by contacting Tawa Library as numbers are limited. Suitable for children aged 7+ years accompanied by their caregivers.

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: 5th October 10.30 – 11.30am (Bookings required, please contact the library)

 

All events are free. Parents/caregivers are expected to accompany and supervise children at all activities. Contact the host library for more information about each event.

 

2018 Hugo Award Winners — plus, Worldcon coming to NZ in 2020!

The news that the 78th Worldcon (World Science Fiction Convention, the annual convention of the World Science Fiction Society) would be coming to Wellington in 2020 was greeted with excitement and no small amount of anticipation in our libraries! We hope you’re just as excited, and if you’re just coming to the news now, the icing on the cake is that master storyteller George R. R. Martin has been announced as Master of Ceremonies.

But, it’s not just the Master of Ceremonies announcement that has us salivating. All elements, strands and areas of the science fiction community will be catered for, and plans are afoot for the genre to be celebrated in style with events, workshops, signings and much, much more!

One aspect of Worldcon that has us the most excited, is that every year Worldcon hosts science fiction’s most prestigious awards, the Hugo Awards.  The Hugo awards are the science fiction world’s equivalent of the Pulitzers, the Oscars and the Grammys all rolled into one (we exaggerate, but only slightly!). It’s a wide and inclusive list this year. In past years, some of science fiction’s most loved authors have been recipients — Neil Gaiman, Isaac Asimov, Connie Willis, Philip K. Dick, and Ursula K. Le Guin, amongst others.

This year’s Worldcon was in San José, California, and below you’ll find this year’s celebrated authors and their wonderful novels — recommended loudly by librarians near and far. Choose any one for an immersive reading experience, ideas that will expand and entertain, and the best of the best science fiction has to offer. Have a browse and join us in our excitement for 2020 and Wellington’s very own host city experience!

2018 Hugo Award Winners

Best Novel:

Syndetics book coverThe stone sky by  N.K. Jemisin.
“The shattering conclusion to the post-apocalyptic and highly acclaimed  trilogy that began with The Fifth Season, winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2016, and The Obelisk Gate, winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 2017. The Moon will soon return — whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe.” (Adapted from Syndetics)

Best Related Work:

Syndetics book coverNo Time to Spare : Thinking About What Matters by Ursula K Le Guin. 
“In her last great frontier of life, old age, Ursula K. Le Guin explored new literary territory — the blog, a forum where she shined. The collected best of Ursula’s blog, No Time to Spare presents perfectly crystallized dispatches on what mattered to her late in life, her concerns with the world, and her wonder at it: “How rich we are in knowledge, and in all that lies around us yet to learn. Billionaires, all of us.”” (Adapted from Syndetics)

Best Graphic story:

Syndetics book coverMonstress. Volume two, The blood / Marjorie Liu, writer ; Sana Takeda, artist.
“The Eisner-nominated Monstress is back! Maika, Kippa,and Ren journey to Thyria in search of answers to her past… and discover a new, terrible, threat.”
(Adapted from Syndetics)

Best Young Adult book:

Syndetics book coverAkata warrior by (the fantastic) Nnedi Okorafor.
(Sequel to Akata Witch)
“A year ago, Sunny Nwazue, an American-born girl Nigerian girl, was inducted into the secret Leopard Society. As she began to develop her magical powers, Sunny learned that she had been chosen to lead a dangerous mission to avert an apocalypse, brought about by the terrifying masquerade, Ekwensu. Now, stronger, feistier, and a bit older, Sunny is studying with her mentor Sugar Cream and struggling to unlock the secrets in her strange Nsibidi book. With the support of her Leopard Society friends, Orlu, Chichi, and Sasha, and of her spirit face, Anyanwu, she will travel through worlds both visible and invisible to the mysteries town of Osisi, where she will fight a climactic battle to save humanity.” (Adapted from Syndetics)

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Māori Language Week

Nau mai, haere mai to Wellington City Libraries to celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori
10th – 16th September

Kōhunga Kōrero i Te Wharepukapuka o Te Mahanga (Karori Library)
Monday 10th September 10:30 – 11:00am

Did you know that we have four te reo Māori story times each month.  These story times are called Kōhunga Kōrero.  It doesn’t matter if you don’t speak Māori as the presenters make it fun for everyone.   So come along and celebrate Māori Language week with your nohinohi (preschooler) at Karori Library

Kōhunga Kōrero: Pakiwaitara i roto i te reo Māori. E 30 meneti pakiwaitara, rotarota, waiata hoki i roto i te reo Māori mō ngā kōhungahunga me ō rātou mātua kaitiaki.

Monthly story times in te reo Māori are available at Miramar, Newtown, Johnsonville and Karori libraries. Open to anyone, these free thirty minute sessions feature stories, rhymes and waiata in te reo Māori, and are perfect for 2-6 year olds and their caregivers

Check out your local Kōhunga Kōrero session:

1st Tuesday of each month at 10.30am
Omāroro (Newtown) Library
13 Constable Street, Newtown

2nd Monday of each month at 10.30am
Te Māhanga (Karori) Library
247 Karori Road, Karori

3rd Tuesday of each month at 10.30am
Waitohi (Johnsonville) Library
5 Broderick Road, Johnsonville

4th Tuesday of each month at 2pm
Motukairangi (Miramar) Library
68 Miramar Avenue, Miramar

Check out the Library event calendar for specific dates.

Māori Language Parade and Entertainment at Te Ngākau (Civic Square)
Monday 10th September 12:00pm – 1:45pm

On Monday 10th Wellington City Libraries will be participating in The Wellington Māori Language Parade.  The theme for this years Māori Language Week will be ‘Kia Kaha te Reo Māori’ following on from the success of last years theme ‘Kia Ora te Reo Māori’.

Click here for Māori Language Week resources

The hīkoi will start at 12:00pm at Parliament grounds and continue through the center of town to ‘Te Ngākau’ the (Civic Square).  Keep an eye out for the Wellington City Libraries Book Bike and come and find us in ‘Te Ngākau’ where we will have some te reo Māori book giveaways.

The parade floats should be arriving at Te Ngākau at approximately 12:45pm and the entertainment will continue on to 1:45pm.  When the entertainment ends come up to the library and pick up some Māori language resources.

Baby Rock & Rhyme in te Reo Māori at Central Library

Wednesday, 12 September 9:30- 10:00am  &

Thursday, 13 September 2:00 – 2:30pm

The two regular Baby Rock & Rhyme sessions held at Central Library will be in te reo Māori during Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.  These are enjoyable no matter what level of te reo Māori you have.  Baby Rock & Rhyme is for parents and carers to interact with their babies through rhymes, finger-plays and stories delivered by experienced presenters.   These free, weekly interactive sessions are a great opportunity to have fun, socialise and spend quality ‘one-on-one’ time with your tot and for this week to have fun with te reo Māori.

Pre-school storytime in te Reo Māori at Central Library

Tuesday, 11 September 10:30- 11:00am  &

Friday, 14 September 10:30- 11:00am 

The two regular pre-school storytime sessions held at Central Library will have lots of te reo Māori during Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.  These are enjoyable no matter what level of te reo Māori you have. Storytime runs for about half an hour, with stories and songs. Pre-school storytimes are fun and free – there’s no charge, and you don’t have to book. Storytime is aimed at pre-school age children (three and four years old) – but younger siblings are always welcome so come and have some fun with your pre-schooler and learn some te reo Māori.

Māori Language Resources at Wellington Libraries

From beginner to expert we have some great learning resources no matter where you are on your journey to learning te reo Māori.  Check out these great te reo Māori language resources that can help you as you learn.


First hundred words in Māori / Amery, Heather
“A companion to 2006s First Thousand Words in Maori. Big, brightly-coloured pictures engage young learners and are accompanied by clear illustrations, with the Māori word underneath.  There is also a guide to pronunciation and counting. Learn Maori with Huia’ is an on-going series of books and resources to inspire and help anyone who is interested in learning Maori. You can go to the Huia website www.huia.co.nz and connect to a link where you can listen to a native Maori speaker to learn how to pronounce every Maori word correctly. You can also download picture puzzles and games for free.” (Catalogue)

A Māori word a day : 365 words to kickstart your reo / Kelly, Hēmi
“A Māori dictionary for all New Zealanders. Through its 365 Māori words, you will learn the following: English translations; word category, notes and background information; Sample sentences, in both te reo Māori and English”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

Māori made easy : for everyday learners of the Māori language / Morrison, Scotty
“The complete and accessible guide to learning the Maori language, no matter your knowledge level. While dictionaries list words and definitions, and other guides offer common phrases, Maori Made Easy connects the dots, allowing the reader to take control of their language-learning in an empowering and effective way. By committing just 30 minutes a day for 30 weeks, learners will progress at their own pace and adopt the language as best suits their individual needs. Maori Made Easy proves that learning the language can be fun, absorbing – and easy Also available as an eBook.” (Catalogue)

Māori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Morrison, Scotty
“An introduction to the Māori language … covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

The Raupō phrasebook of modern Māori : the user-friendly guide for all New Zealanders / Morrison, Scotty
“The Raupo Phrasebook of Modern Maori is the most up-to-date, versatile and relevant resource for using Maori language in everyday life.  Whether you’re a novice or emergent speaker of te reo Maori, or a complete beginner.  Written in a user-friendly manner, with everyday New Zealanders in mind, and with a focus on modern-day language, The Raupo Phrasebook of Modern Maori is the guide that no home should be without.” (Catalogue)

Te hikuwai : launch yourself into te reo Māori : a complete foundation course for Aotearoa’s own language / Cormack, Ian
“Te Hikuwai is a bilingual course in Te Reo Maori for learners of all backgrounds. It aims to present Maori as a vibrant language for today’s world and with dynamic prospects for the future. Te Hikuwai (the stream) is the first of two levels in a foundation course. Te Moana Waiwai (the open sea) is the second. Te Hikuwai is designed for learners with little or no previous experience of Maori, and aims to equip them with the basics of the language.” (Catalogue)

Mai i te kākano / Jacob, Hēni
“Do you feel like your Maori language proficiency has plateaued? Are you looking for alternative, more Maori, more fun ways to say things in everyday situations? Do you have trouble sustaining lively and meaningful conversations with your kids and grandchildren, your friends and colleagues? Written entirely in Maori (excpt for some Maori to English translations at the bottom of some pages), this book includes sections on Maori idiom and metaphor, common errors, and examples of language in use in a variety of settings.   It provides a unique, “more Maori”, more fun way to say things in everyday situations.” (Catalogue)

A Māori reference grammar / Harlow, Ray
“Based on a third-year university course Ray Harlow taught for a number of years, this grammar reference book is intended for people whose knowledge of Māori is at that level or higher – advanced learners, native speakers and teachers of Māori. It guides readers progressively from the simple to the more complicated, starting with words and particles, proceeding through simple clauses and sentences to transformations of these and to complex sentences with elaborate internal structure”–Publisher information.” (Catalogue)

He pātaka kupu : te kai a te rangatira.
He Pātaka Kupu- te kai a te rangatira is a taonga – a landmark Māori-only language resource, compiled out of seven years’ research by the Māori Language Commission. Containing almost 24,000 entries, it is a comprehensive and authoritative dictionary of the Māori language, for proficient Māori speakers. For each entry, the dictionary gives the ātua category, parts of speech, definitions, examples of the word used in context, and an etymology of the word, drawing on a wide corpus of written material in te reo.” (Catalogue)

 

It’s National Poetry Day!

It’s National Poetry Day and our exciting poetry event is happening today at 1pm! See below for the event details, and you can find more information on our blog.
Today’s fantastic featured poet is Janis Freegard. Enjoy, and we hope to see you in the library this afternoon!

Honey

It was manuka honey, the best kind
in a big, white plastic bucket, given to you
by someone with bees, because you’d been helpful,
so much honey, it might last a lifetime
and you being you, and maybe why I love you,
you spooned it out into carefully washed jars
for your uncle, your mother, your brothers,
our friend with the little boy, your mother’s neighbour
who had the birthday, all that honey, and after all
that you gave away, there was still so much left for us.

Janis Freegard

 

Details:

Friday 24 August, 1–3.30pm
Central Library, 65 Victoria Street

You can RSVP to this event on Facebook

Come along to hear poets from Mākaro Press, Fitzbeck Books and The Cuba Press bewitch, berate, busk and bewilder!

Featuring:
Mary Cresswell, Nicola Easthope, Jamie Trower, Janis Freegard, Tim Jones, John Boyd, Rob King, Richard Langston, Mary Mccallum, Anne Powell, John Howell, Peter Rawnsley, and Stefanie Lash.

Janis Freegard poem

1 day until National Poetry Day: Keith Westwater

National Poetry Day and our exciting poetry event are happening tomorrow! See below for the event details, and you can find more information on our blog.
Today’s fantastic featured poet is Keith Westwater.

Details:

Friday 24 August, 1–3.30pm
Central Library, 65 Victoria Street

You can RSVP to this event on Facebook

Come along to hear poets from Mākaro Press, Fitzbeck Books and The Cuba Press bewitch, berate, busk and bewilder!

Featuring:
Mary Cresswell, Nicola Easthope, Jamie Trower, Janis Freegard, Tim Jones, John Boyd, Rob King, Richard Langston, Mary Mccallum, Anne Powell, John Howell, Peter Rawnsley, and Stefanie Lash.

Keith Westwater poem

3 days until National Poetry Day: Peter Rawnsley

There are three days to go until National Poetry Day and our exciting poetry event – see below for the event details, and you can find more information on our blog.
Today’s wonderful featured poet is Peter Rawnsley.

Details:

Friday 24 August, 1–3.30pm
Central Library, 65 Victoria Street

You can RSVP to this event on Facebook

Come along to hear poets from Mākaro Press, Fitzbeck Books and The Cuba Press bewitch, berate, busk and bewilder!

Featuring:
Mary Cresswell, Nicola Easthope, Jamie Trower, Janis Freegard, Tim Jones, John Boyd, Rob King, Richard Langston, Mary Mccallum, Anne Powell, John Howell, Peter Rawnsley, and Stefanie Lash.

Peter Rawnsley poem

4 days until National Poetry Day: Mary McCallum

There are four days to go until National Poetry Day and our exciting poetry event – see below for the event details, and you can find more information on our blog.
Today’s featured poet is Mary McCallum – enjoy!

Details:

Friday 24 August, 1–3.30pm
Central Library, 65 Victoria Street

You can RSVP to this event on Facebook

Come along to hear poets from Mākaro Press, Fitzbeck Books and The Cuba Press bewitch, berate, busk and bewilder!

Featuring:
Mary Cresswell, Nicola Easthope, Jamie Trower, Janis Freegard, Tim Jones, John Boyd, Rob King, Richard Langston, Mary Mccallum, Anne Powell, John Howell, Peter Rawnsley, and Stefanie Lash.