Kōrero with Morrie Love of the Tenths Trust at Central Library

On Friday 27 April (12:30pm),  Morrie Love, chairman of Wellington Tenths Trust will present Stories behind the Māori place names of Te Whanganui-a-Tara  / Wellington (harbour)

Whatu  Ngarongaro  He  Tangata,  Toitū  He  Whenua

Man disappears but the land remains

In the early 1800s the stories behind the naming of the land in Te Whanganui-a-Tara were often sourced to Te  Whatahoro Jury and three women  –  Ngarimu Mawene,  Mere Ngamai and Rangiwahia Te Puni.

Te  Whatahoro  Jury

Hoani Te Whatahoro Jury
Hoani Te Whatahoro Jury. Ref: 1/2-024828. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/23175005

Te Whatahoro Jury was born 1841 in Hawkes Bay — his father worked for William Williams.  In 1842 the family moved to Wairarapa.  He became a scribe to Te Matorohanga and Nepia Pohuhu and was charged with recording tribal traditions on behalf of his iwi.  Some of this material was used later, by Elsdon Best, T. W. Downes, S. Percy Smith and John White.  He married seven times.  He died 1923 and is buried at Papawai cemetery.

Ngarimu  Mawene  Hohua

Ngarimu Mawene is listed in documents held at Te Papa. Ngarimu Mawene may have been connected to Hohua Te Atuawera and Hariata Mawene, with links therefore Te Ngatoro and  (first?) husband, Wakairianiwa.  Te Ngatoro was, in turn, a daughter to Aniwaniwa and Tawhirikura.  It is said that, as a young girl, Ngarimu danced on the beach at Pito-one as the “Tory Pioneers” arrived in 1839.[1]

Mere  Kapa  Ngamai  I

Mere Kapa Ngamai I was the daughter of Rawiri Kowheta and Maweuweu.

She married, firstly James Harrison, and their children were James Te Tana Harrison and Mere Kapa Ngamai II.  Mere later married Wi Tako Ngatata.  She was also known as Mere Ngawai o Te Wharepouri.

Mere was a well-known composer — two of her compositions which have survived:

(Link is to Legends of the Māori.  Vol. I / James Cowan)

Rangi  Te  Puni

Wairau April 1851, Charles Gold
Gold, Charles Emilius, 1809-1871 : Wairau April 1851. Ref: A-329-014. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/23236682

Rangi Te Puni is believed to have been born in Waipa Valley, with links to Tainui and Ngāti Rārua. She succeeded to land at Te Tau Ihu o te Waka. Rangiwahia,(Rangiwhaia) was the daughter of Rangitakaia, and grandchild of Hinehape.[2] Rangiwahia was the wife of Henare Te Puni, who in turn was the son of Honiana Te Puni and Wikitoria Muri-tu-waka-roto.

[Whakapapa of Aperaham Huritapae: Nelson MB, 13/6/89 / [WMB  NO. 3, P. 39]

James  Cowan

James Cowan at his desk, writing
James Cowan at his desk, writing. Ruscoe, Ivan, fl 1990s : Photographs relating to James Cowan. Ref: PAColl-5877-5. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/22311747

James Cowan has written about Māori place names  of Te Whanganui-a-Tara in the Evening Post, 1912. These are available on PapersPast, in the Evening Post:

Cowan’s kōrero has been reproduced, also, in Pat Lawlor‘s book:

Old Wellington Days.  Chapter 8:  James Cowan and his Wellington Place-names.

Old Wellington Days, by Pat Lawlor
Old Wellington Days, by Pat Lawlor

Threads are picked up again in:

A list of Māori place names of Te Whanganui-a-Tara  concludes Elsdon Best’s The land of Tara.  Here is a map from that book.

The Land of Tara, by Elsdon Best
The Land of Tara, by Elsdon Best

Te Whatahoro Jury’s work in transcribing  oral histories possibly, formed a basis for stories in Elsdon Best’s – The land of Tara, published first in the Journal of the Polynesian Society, and then in book form, 1919.

Best’s list of names was revised and greatly expanded by G Leslie Adkin in:

The great harbour of Tara : traditional Māori place-names and sites of Wellington harbour and environs / G Leslie Adkin (1959)

The Great Harbour of Tara, by G. Leslie Adkin

Surveyors

Māori have long had an interest in the spiritual value of land: it pervades their sense of identity and how they relate to others. But land is also the foundation of their survival, in economic as well as cultural terms [3]

Book Jacket for: Boundary markers : land surveying and the colonisation of New ZealandBoundary markers : land surveying and the colonisation of New Zealand / Byrnes, Giselle

Giselle Byrnes, writing of surveyors as Pākehā boundary markers, shows that these men were also naming the land, and “owning” the whenua for their colonial government in a way that parallels the Māori concept of Tapa Whenua.

 

Boundary markers suggest that the surveyors colonised the land through language, literally inscribing it with new meanings and ways of seeing:  place naming and mapping are perhaps the best examples of this [4]

For Māori, in oral tradition, naming the land was essential for defining  iwi and  hapū boundaries. Sites of tribal significance — maunga, awa, moana  then become key elements in kawa o te marae, and  whanaungatanga, in rituals of encounter, where politeness decrees that you ask not “ko wai koe?/ who are you?”, but rather, “nō hea koe? / where are you from?”

Surveyors extended their sketching skills to record not just Pākehā boundaries, but also snapshots of the life and times of our tūpuna.

Somes Island

Legend has it that both Matiu and Makaro Islands received their original Māori names from Kupe, the semi-legendary first navigator to reach New Zealand and get home again with reports of the new land. He named them after his two daughters (or, in some versions of the tale, nieces) when he first entered the harbour about 1000 years ago.

Somes Island : Matiu (1990)
Somes Island : Matiu (1990)

“After European settlement, the island was known for over a century as Somes Island. In 1839 it fell under the control of the New Zealand Company along with much of the greater Wellington region.”

“The island was renamed after Joseph Somes, the company’s deputy-governor and financier at the time. In 1997 however, the New Zealand Geographic Board assigned the official bilingual name of Matiu/Somes in recognition of the island’s colourful European and Māori histories.” [5]

I look forward to Morrie Love’s kōrero to reveal the layers of history that lie both beneath our feet and before our eyes, and  to provide an opportunity to understand the heritage of Te Whanganui-a-Tara.

References

  1. Stories in names / Tohunga.   New Zealand Railways magazine ; vol. 9, issue 6 (1934)
  2. Maori Land Court.  Nelson Minute Book.   13/6/89.  P. 39.
  3. Byrnes, Giselle.   Boundary markers.  P. 2
  4. Ibid.  p. 6
  5. Wikipedia contributors. (2018, March 16). Matiu / Somes Island. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 02:26, April 13, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Matiu_/_Somes_Island&oldid=830688561

Dancing Through the Pages @ Central

April 21 – 29 is NZ Dance Week #NZDW2018 and we are celebrating here at the Central Library with Dancing Through the Pages, a series of evening talks from some of Wellington’s finest performing artists talking about their craft with a short taste of their live performances as well!

Have you ever wanted to know what it takes to choreograph a work or compose music for dance? Or wondered what the day to day looks like for a dancer or how they shake stage-fright? Or are you just simply curious about their current reading lists? Dancing Through the Pages is a unique opportunity to meet artists at the top of their game with the chance to ask them any burning questions you have about their art-form.

So come along and fill your evenings with movement, music and intrigue among the book shelves!

What’s the Schedule?

Tuesday 24 April/ 6pm  –  Sensory Dance Theatre
Sacha Copland & Emma Coppersmith from Java Dance Theatre will give an insight into creating a sensory experience for theatre goers. Learn about Java’s immersive processes and how food can make a great stage companion and open up a world of ritual.

Thursday 26 April / 6pm – A Song & Dance
Come along and hear contemporary dancer/choreographer Lucy Marinkovich and jazz musician Lucien Johnson  talk about their creative partnership, following their 2017 award-winning dance-theatre show, Lobsters. Find out about collaboration and why it’s important in the arts, plus treat your ears to some smooth saxophone from Lucien.

Friday 27 April 6pm – A Choreographer at Work
Meet Loughlan Prior; dancer, choreographer, filmmaker and a Royal New Zealand Ballet staple. Come along to this final session of Dancing Through the Pages and hear Loughlan talk about his creative process, plus get a behind the scenes glimpse into the mechanics of choreographing a duet. Featuring special guests RNZB dancers Luke Cooper and Georgia Powley

 

Want to know more about the artists?

ABOUT JAVA DANCE THEATRE
Java Dance Theatre is dance theatre that gets under your skin. Founded in 2003 by New Zealand School of Dance graduate, Sacha Copland, Java captures audiences with visceral dance and captivating story-telling. Combining playful physicality, live music and audience immersion Java has captured hearts around New Zealand and the world. Their strong repertoire of original works includes The Wine Project, Dirt and Other Delicious Ingredients, Back of the Bus, The Creamery, Cheese, and Rise.

ABOUT BORDERLINE ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Borderline Arts Ensemble is a performing arts collective established by dancer and choreographer Lucy Marinkovich in 2015 to facilitate her contemporary dance and performance art works. In 2017 Borderline presented Good Good Fortune at the Performance Arcade (Wellington, NZ) and the George Town Arts Festival (Penang, Malaysia), as well as developing choreography for  The Shyness of Trees during an artist residency at Dance Nucleus in Singapore.  Borderline’s first full length dance-theatre work Lobsters premiered in an independent season at Circa Theatre and was the winner of three 2017 Wellington Theatre Awards.

ABOUT LOUGHLAN PRIOR
Loughlan Prior is an Aussie/Kiwi choreographer and performer based in Wellington, New Zealand. He is the choreographer in residence at the Royal New Zealand Ballet (RNZB) and the creative director of Prior Visual, a project based film collective. Loughlan has produced works for the RNZB, the New Zealand School of Dance and recently premiered a piece with the Grand Rapids Ballet in the United States. His film projects have met acclaim both nationally and internationally, his collaborative film Genome featured in Wellington’s treasured 2017 LUX Light Festival.

Can’t get enough of dance?

We completely understand! Not to worry, check out our Q&A with our speakers to find out more about their favourite dance books! Our Librarians have also been putting together some dance themed lists for your reading and viewing pleasure, check out our most recent Biographies Blog Modern Bodies: The Best of Dance Biographies and our latest movies blog of our favourite dance movies!

It’s NZ Dance Week Question Time!

We are counting down to NZ Dance Week (5, 6, 7, 8… get it?) and are getting SO excited for what’s happening at Central Library that week, that librarians have been started tapping and jiving through the shelves! So in the lead up to Dancing Through The Pages we quizzed our upcoming performers about their favourite books and current reading habits!

In order of the week’s performances, we kicked things off with choreographer and Artistic Director of Java Dance Theatre Sacha Copland.

So Sacha, tell us what are you reading at the moment?
“I usually have a few books on the go at any one time. For fun I am reading The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur.  For research for my next work I am reading The Brilliant History of Colour in Art by Victoria Finlay and Chocolate Nations, Living and Dying for Cocoa in West Africa by Orla Ryan. I am really interested in exploring colour more. There is too much monochrome! Also my next work is about chocolate so I have to research every aspect of it before I make it, the good, the bad and the ugly.”

What about your all-time favourite book character?
“This is tricky to answer! Maybe Aomame, a martial-arts instructor and physical therapist from Haruki Murakami’s IQ84. I also love Aliena in The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett.”

Next up we have contemporary dancer and choreographer Lucy Marinkovich along with saxophonist and composer Lucien Johnson who answered our questions with the same creative partnership that we will hear more about at ‘A Song & Dance’!

What are you two reading at the moment?
Lucien: “Talking to My Daughter about the Economy by Yanis Varoufakis
Lucy: “Bright Air Black by David Vann (in preparation for the NZ Festival show OrphEus: a dance opera).”

Do you two have a favourite dance book or magazine?
Lucien: “For me it’s a music book: Music is my Mistress by Duke Ellington.”
Lucy: “Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild.”

Lucien, what about your favourite book to recommend?
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin or Symphony for the City of the Dead by M.T Anderson.”

For the final act we asked the same round of quickfire questions to the man behind ‘The Story of LARK’ Louglan Prior, RNZB dancer, choreographer and filmmaker extraordinaire!

What are you reading at the moment?
The History of Bees by Maja Lunde.”

Your all-time favourite book character?
“Albus Dumbledore.”
(We can’t fault you there, #WCLLovesHarryPotter!!)

What about your favourite book to recommend?
The Reader by Bernhard Schlink.”

And final question, do you have a favourite dance book or magazine?
David Hallberg’s autobiography – A Body of Work: Dancing to the Edge and Back and DANZ Magazine.”

Want to know more about Dancing Through the Pages and what’s happening for NZ Dance Week? Check out wcl.govt.nz/danceweek for all of the info, add the Facebook Event to your calendar and follow the hashtag #nzdw2018! We hope to see you there!

Pro-tip: don’t miss our most recent biographies booklist! We’ve hand-picked a selection of some of the prominent dancers in history, from Gene Kelly to Michael Jackson. We couldn’t resist making a list of our favourite dance movies as well, what better reason to relive Footloose is there! Take a look!

NZDW 2018

An evening with astrophotographer Mark Gee

Have you ever sat under the stars, gazed at the night sky and wished you could capture it? Seen photos of the milky way, looked down at your camera and wondered how on earth they did it?

If that sounds like you, then come along to the Central Library and hear Wellington based astrophotographer Mark Gee talk about his photographic journey and share his story of how he came to be the self-taught award winning photographer he is today!

A post shared by Mark Gee (@theartofnight) on Swing by the library after work on Wednesday April 4th at 6pm to meet the man himself and hear about the Art of Night, and learn how you can get started, how to use social media as a marketing tool, and how you can continue to develop as a photographer.

Mark will be talking for about 30 minutes so there will be plenty of question time as well!

Looking for more resources for your own photography?

Check out the free online course available through Lynda.com, with courses on everything from Photography 101, to Exploring Composition, How to Create a Portfolio, using Photoshop, and even Aerial Photography with Drones and a how to on Landscape Photography: Iceland!

All you need to login in your Library card number and your last name.

You can also take a look at our Photography Recent Picks Blog or check out our new collection on Overdrive: Get Creative With Design & Photography

Chinese New Year storytimes at Central!

Come and celebrate the Year of the Dog with Chinese storytime events at Wellington Central Library! Ni Hao Children’s Community are presenting these special storytime events with Chinese picture books and action songs for pre-schoolers and their families, no previous knowledge of Chinese needed. Children (and adults) can dress up in their favourite costumes and bring along a toy dog to hear songs, stories and rhymes in Chinese. Then check out the Chinese New Year performances, activities, food and fun in Civic Square!

Where: Wellington Central Library

When: Saturday 17th February, 9.30-10am & 3-3.30pm

Experience an underwater reef with VR – fully booked

Want to experience a coral reef with no diving gear required? Visit our Central Library and try out a full Virtual Reality experience for free

Explore a coral reef

Wednesday 21 Feb
12:30-2:00pm (Fully booked)

4:00-6:00pm (Fully booked)

Thursday 22 Feb
12:30-2:00pm (Fully booked)

4:00-6:00pm (Fully booked)

Friday 23 Feb
12:30-4:00pm (Fully booked)

All sessions will take place on the ground floor at Central Library, 65 Victoria Street.

Email us at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz to find out more.

This opportunity is happening to celebrate 2018 as the International Year of the Reef. We have two more IYOR 2018 events happening this month. They are:

 

Deep Water Coral Reefs of New Zealand Talk

Dr Ashley Rowden / NIWA

Coral on a coral reef

Friday 23 Feb
5:30-6:30pm
Ground floor, Central Library, 65 Victoria Street

Dr Ashley Rowden is a Principal Scientist in Marine Ecology at NIWA.

Dr Rowden’s talk will be about deep water coral reefs in New Zealand, which are different from shallow water reefs — with emphasis on the themes of the 2018 International Year of the Reef (threats, management, conservation and sustainable use) in a New Zealand context. He will share examples from research undertaken at NIWA.

 

A Special Virtual Reality Reef Demonstration

Taehyun Rhee /Associate Professor at Victoria University

Saturday 24 Feb
12:30-4:00pm (Fully booked)
Ground floor, Central Library, 65 Victoria Street

Taehyun Rhee is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science at Victoria University, as well as Deputy Director of Victoria’s Computational Media Innovation Centre (CMIC), and a founder of Mixed Reality startup DreamFlux. He is a founder and director of the Victoria Computer Graphics (VCG) Lab and the founding member of Victoria’s Computer Graphics Programme, established in collaboration with Weta Digital.

DreamFlux technology provides immersive VR experiences by realistically compositing digital content into 360° video. This process is achieved in real-time, allowing for interactive content. The seamless blending of digital content into the real world in an interactive setting allows for powerful applications in education, training, entertainment and more. Dreamflux technology mitigates potential visual discomfort in VR headsets by rendering at a high frame rate (90 FPS, stereo).

Coral reef

Rainbow Storytime!

Photo courtesy Upper Hutt City Library

Celebrate our Rainbow Families with a special storytime event at Wellington Central Library as part of Wellington Pride Festival! This special storytime event will be presented by the fabulous Drag Queen LaQuisha St Redfern and friends featuring books from our library collection. These Rainbow Storytime events help to teach children about acceptance with themes of family, love and friendship, being different and belonging, being unique and accepted and are for children, families and anyone who likes a good story!

Where: Wellington Central Library

When: Saturday 3rd March, 2-2.30pm

Summer booksale starts Tuesday 5 December

booksale2014aEvery year thousands of avid readers and movie & music lovers gather at Central Library for our book sales. Judging by their past popularity, this sale should be no different. Past buyers have used the sale to find the best book deals, to complete their personal collections or just to rummage and find a gem. And the sale helps our libraries by making room for an ever increasing collection.

Highlights of this two-week sale include a great range of non-fiction, supported by a wide variety of DVDs and CDs. As at each previous event, stock is replenished at regular intervals ensuring there are always fresh bargains to be found. And they really are bargains – prices start from 50 cents for magazines,while adult fiction, young adult/teens books and most other items are between $1 and $6.

If you love a bargain, you won’t want to miss it. The book sale starts Tuesday 5 December at 9.30am, Central Library.

The 12 Storytimes of Christmas

It’s that time of year where it’s great to escape the hustle and bustle of Christmas fever and find some time to spend with your family. And where better to do that than at Wellington City Libraries, listening to stories and songs for the Christmas and festive season. So bring the kids down for a wonderful evening and get lost in the magical world of stories.

Island Bay Library: 7th December, 10.30am

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: 7th December, 6.30pm

Brooklyn Library: 11th December, 6.30pm

Karori Library: 14th December, 6.30pm

Wadestown Library: 14th December, 6.30pm

Johnsonville Library: 15th December, 6.30pm

Newtown Library: 15th December, 6.30pm

Central Library: 16th December, 2pm

Miramar Library: 18th December, 6.30pm

CPK Ngaio Library: 18th December, 6.30pm

Ruth Gotlieb Kilbirnie Library: 21st December, 6.30pm

Khandallah Library: 21st December, 6.30pm

Big Book Bash: Children and Youth Literary Festival

Fancy escaping from Wellington for the day? Then bring the family, head over the hills to Carterton in the Wairarapa and join in the fun at the BIG BOOK BASH on Saturday 2nd December. The Big Book Bash has something for everyone, with fun activities, readings, storytelling, workshops, book sales and signings, performances and more. Some of highlights include zine making with Murtle Chickpea, paper bag dogs with Fifi Colston, creative writing workshop with Mandy Hagar, Rainbow Storytimes with LaQuisha St Redfern and Pamela Hancock, author talks and readings with Juliette McIver, Paul Beavis, Allan Bagnall, Ali Foster, Anne Manchester, Mary MaCallum and so much more. With over 30+ events on offer and some amazing authors and illustrators to inspire and delight you this will be a day to be remembered and the best bit, it’s all FREE!

While you’re there perusing the offerings keep an eye out for the Wellington City Libraries’ stand where we will be running a Scavenger Hunt with a bag full of books for the prize!

What: Big Book Bash

Where: Carterton Events Centre, Carterton District Library and Carterton Community Courthouse

When: Saturday 2nd December, 11am – 6pm