Returning your Central Library items

library updateAt the end of April we alerted customers that items loaned from the Central Library had their due dates extended to 19 June. If you have items borrowed from the Central Library, please make sure you return them to any of our 12 libraries so that other library members can enjoy our collections. There are still no fees applicable if you return your items to a branch other than the library you borrowed them from.

Overdue fees will apply if items are not returned or renewed by the due date. We have been sending out courtesy reminders to customers who have items due on that date. If you don’t already receive courtesy reminders, please make sure that your contact details are up to date by emailing us at enquries@wcl.govt.nz or talking to library staff.

New co-operative space to open at National Library

A partnership between the National Library and Wellington City Council to develop library services was announced today by Internal Affairs Minister Tracey Martin.

The Minister says since Wellington’s Central Library was closed, the National Library has been working with the Council to look at creative ways to deliver complementary services.

“Both share the goal of making sure people have access to knowledge. It’s great there’s going to be a new co-operative space, where some of Wellington’s Central Library services and collection can complement National Library’s open access research collections,” says Minister Martin.

National Librarian Bill Macnaught says the new space will be adjacent to the popular He Tohu exhibition. “National Library school group visitors will be able to use the new ‘bleachers’ mini theatre area for visits to He Tohu.

Wellington Mayor, Justin Lester, says Wellingtonians are missing the Central Library and this is one way this special collaboration can enhance library services to customers. “We’re really excited to work together with the National Library for the benefit of Wellingtonians and all New Zealanders. The partnership with the National Library will form a part of the Capital’s replacement library services network,” says Justin Lester.

The new co-operative space is expected to be open in September offering customers a small collection of books and magazines to browse and borrow, access to digital content, free WiFi, and public PCs. A librarian will be on hand to answer questions and join up new members.

Questions and answers for the National Library & WCC Partnership

When will the partnership space open?
It will take some time to fit out and set up the space, but we aim to have it open in September.

How long will the partnership space be open?
This depends on the Council’s eventual decision about the future of the Central Library building and the National Library’s future use plans for the site. It could be several years before we have a Central Library again.  Our initial partnership agreement is until the end of 2021, at which time both parties will review and agree any changes.

What can I borrow from this library?
We expect around 7,000 items will be available to browse and borrow. Items will have a New Zealand focus and complement the National Library’s existing collection.

What else can I do there?
Get access to digital content, free WiFi, and public PCs with scanning and printing facilities. A librarian will be on hand to answer questions and join up new members.

How many library staff will work there?
Up to 5 Wellington City Libraries’ staff will be based at the partnership space.

When will other pop-up libraries open?
Arapaki Manners Library and Service Centre is set to open on Tuesday 28 May.  Details about other library sites in the CBD network will be available in the coming weeks.

What’s happening with the Central Library building?
At this stage we are awaiting further engineering advice on what the options are for addressing the structural issues with the building.  It is likely there will be a range of options for how we approach this and we don’t know yet if this will include any kind of upgrading or redevelopment beyond the required remedial work.

Tiriti Talks: Morgan Godfery — Te Arawhiti / Māori Crown Relations and the Tiriti

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the third of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  14 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Morgan Godfery

Morgan Godfery has whakapapa links to Te Pahipoto hapū of Ngāti Awa, and Lalomanu of Hāmoa/Samoa.  He is a political writer (but not a member of any political party).

His strong commitment to issues affecting Māori has driven his weekly/daily  comments  on social media via his twitter account and e-Tangata. An earlier focus of his writing was his blog, Maui Street.

Although the blog is now inactive, there is an impressive list of his published work there.

Read Morgan Godfery on Bridget Williams Books

You can read two of Morgan’s works online — Māui Street and The Interregnum — through our Bridget Williams Books Text Collection subscription (log in with your library card at the links below to start reading):

Māui Street / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“Morgan Godfery is one of New Zealand’s most energising young thinkers. In just a few years he has become a leading voice in the country’s social and political life. Starting out under his own banner, ‘Māui Street’, his writing now appears across national and international publications. This curated selection brings together the best of Godfery’s writing. Read together, the collection charts the emergence of a significant New Zealand voice.” (Bridget Williams Books)

The Interregnum / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“In BWB’s latest book of essays, edited by Morgan Godfery, ten of New Zealand’s sharpest emerging thinkers gather to debate the ‘morbid symptoms’ of the current moment, from precarious work to climate change, and to discuss what shape change might take, from ‘the politics of love’ to postcapitalism”. The Interregnum interrogates the future from the perspective of the generation who will shape it.” (Bridget Williams Books)

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Library services return to central city on 28 May

A new pop-up library to open on Tuesday 28 May sees library services returning to central Wellington for the first time since the closure of the Central Library in March. The new pop-up library at 12 Manners Street is co-located with the Wellington City Council Service Centre, which is moving from its current location on Wakefield Street.

“After the Central Library closed unexpectedly, we grabbed the opportunity to quickly open a pop-up library alongside our new Service Centre location. Manners Street is the perfect spot for the first in our new network of library services for the CBD,” says Mayor, Justin Lester.

Artist impression of Arapaki Manners Library and Service Centre

The pop-up library and service centre is called Arapaki Manners Library and Service Centre. Arapaki are ornamental lattice-work, used particularly between carvings around the walls of meeting houses, and are unique because it takes two artists working together to complete every arapaki. The name was gifted to the site by Taranaki Whānui ki te Upoko o te Ika.

“I know how much Wellingtonians are feeling the loss of the Central Library. I want to assure people the Council is working hard to create the right combination of services and locations for pop-ups across the CBD to help fill the gap left behind. Arapaki is just the start.”

Arapaki will be home to roughly 7,500 items on the shelves at any one time. A small children’s collection will feature alongside a range of fiction, non-fiction and AV items, plus internet access computers and some casual seating. Library staff will be on hand to answer questions, process payments, register new customers, and provide support and advice on the wide range of online content available through our eLibrary.

All the services that are currently available at the Service Centre will continue to be available at the new location.  These include free Wi-Fi, self-service computers and a payments desk.

Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, who holds Wellington City Council’s community facilities portfolio, says Arapaki will be a busy site, with a high collection turnover.  “I would like to remind borrowers there is no need to wait until Arapaki is open to return items loaned from the Central Library before it closed. They can be returned to any of our branch libraries or the returns box at 101 Wakefield St.”

Arapaki Library and Service Centre will be open for Service Centre business Monday to Friday 8am-5pm with extended hours for the pop-up library which will be open Monday to Friday 8am-7pm, Saturday -Sunday 9.30am-5pm.

Additional pop-up libraries will be opening in the coming months. Details will be announced as soon as possible and people can keep up to date on this website, and by following us on Facebook and Twitter.

What can I borrow from Arapaki?
Arapaki will be home to roughly 7,500 items on the shelves at any one time. A small children’s collection will feature alongside a range of fiction, non-fiction and AV items.

What else can I do there?
Internet access computers and some casual seating will be available. Library staff will be on hand to answer questions, process payments, register new customers, and provide support and advice on the wide range of online content available through our eLibrary.

Can I return items to Arapaki?
Yes. Items borrowed from Arapaki should be returned to Arapaki. Items borrowed from the Central Library before it closed can be returned to Arapaki, to any branch library or to the small returns box at 101 Wakefield Street.

Will you have activities available?
Arapaki is a relatively small space, so we need to plan carefully how we can best use it to provide activities. It is likely that we will review what activities and programmes we can offer once our entire CBD pop-up library network is up and running. Arapaki is just the start.

How many staff will work there?
15 library staff will work at Arapaki.

Why has it taken so long to open?
We’ve worked really hard to get Arapaki up and running as fast as we can. Arapaki is the first of our planned CBD pop-up library network. We’ve been able to set it up so quickly because we already had the site leased for our new Service Centre. We’ve had to make some changes to the space to make into a combined library and Service Centre and this has taken a few weeks.

When will other pop-up libraries open?
Arapaki is just the first in our proposed CBD pop-up library network. We’ll be announcing details of further pop-up locations in the coming months.

What’s happening with the Central Library building?
At this stage we are awaiting further engineering advice on what the options are for addressing the structural issues with the building.  It is likely there will be a range of options for how we approach this and we don’t know yet if this will include any kind of upgrading or redevelopment beyond the required remedial work.

 

Tiriti Talks: Jen Margaret – The State of the Pākehā Nation

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the second of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  7 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Jen Margaret

Jen Margaret is a Te Tiriti educator who devotes her time to working with individuals and organisations to deepen our understanding and application of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Her kōrero in this Te Tiriti talk series is based on the State of the Pākehā Nation essay commissioned for Waitangi Day 2018, entitled Ka pū te ruha, ka hao te rangatahi: change in the Pākehā nation. It explores the necessity to unravel privilege, racism and colonisation, and suggests ways in which Pākehā might work to do so.

Jen’s work is guided by the whakataukī : “Ko koe ki tēnā, ko ahau ki tēnēi I kīiwai o te kete”

This whakataukī has been adopted to convey the differing roles and responsibilities for Tangata Tiriti and Tangata Whenua within the Treaty relationship.

Jen has published the following resources which are listed on her website:

Working as allies, non-indigenous supporters of indigenous justice in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngā Rerenga o Te Tiriti provides guidance to groups and organisations within the community sector regarding engaging with the Treaty of Waitangi.

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Longer branch library hours start 15 April

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester today confirmed on-going additional opening hours and days for some branch libraries in response to the closure of the Central Library.

“In the two weeks after the Central Library was closed our branch libraries overall had 9276 more customer visits than when compared to the two weeks before – an increase of 21 percent.”

“During this time, some of our more popular neighbourhood libraries showed significant increases in customer visits, with Karori Library up 21 percent or 3567 more visits. Visits to Wadestown Library went up 20 percent, Brooklyn Library 18 percent and Newtown Library 6 percent.”

“After the Central Library closed, we acted quickly to relocate some of our Central Library staff out to our branch libraries to respond to the increased customer demand.  So I’m very pleased that with the continued support of our staff we’re able to add 31 opening hours per week across the branch library network. We think we have achieved a good match of customer demand with the right increased hours at the right locations, but this will be closely monitored over the coming weeks,” the Mayor said.

New hours will be in place from Monday 15 April at the following libraries:

  • Brooklyn Library – Wednesdays from 10am to 5.30pm (additional 3 hours)
  • Johnsonville Library – Wednesdays from 9.30am to 8pm (additional 2.5 hours)
  • Karori Library – Tuesdays from 9.30am to 8pm and Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 3 hours)
  • Miramar Library – Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 5 hours)
  • Newtown Library – Monday, Tuesday and Wednesdays from 10am to 8pm and Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 7.5 hours)
  • Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library – Saturdays 9.30am to 5pm (additional 1.5 hours)
  • Wadestown Library – Wednesdays from 10am to 5.30pm and Saturdays from 9.30am to 5pm (additional 8.5 hours)

Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, who holds Wellington City Council’s community facilities portfolio, says the first pop-up in Manners Street is due to open in late May, with other library pop-ups opening throughout the year. “The new hours may gradually reduce over time as the CBD library network pop-ups are opened,” she said.

Further details of the locations and services available at the library pop-ups will be announced in the coming weeks. Services are likely to include selections of popular and new items, reserve pick up service, returns, wifi and internet access. Library staff will be on hand to answer questions, process payments, register new customers, and provide support and advice on the wide range of online content available through our eLibrary.

It is anticipated the pop-up service hours will include evenings and weekends.

First pop-up library service for CBD in Manners Street

Wellington Mayor, Justin Lester, today announced the return of library services to the CBD with a new pop-up space set to open in Manners Street. “Manners Street is an ideal location to provide convenient services right in the heart of our city. I am thrilled we have been able to quickly secure this site for the first in what will be a network of library services across the CBD.”

“The new library services pop-up will share 12 Manners Street with the Council service centre that was already planned for the site. It will be great for people to have access to a range of services under the one roof. Both services will open in late May,” said Mr Lester.

At the pop-up, customers will be able to browse and borrow a range of popular and new items, pick up reserves, and return books and other library resources. Self-service options will be available and library staff will be on hand to answer questions, process payments, register new customers, and provide support and advice on the wide range of online content available through our eLibrary.

Free WiFi and some printing, photocopying and internet access facilities will also be available. It is anticipated the pop-up service hours will include late nights and weekends.

“Work to set up the pop up service is already underway. There are lots of moving parts to manage – first we need to complete a fit out, set up our IT infrastructure, select which parts of our collection will be available, and work with our staff.”

“We know Wellingtonians want more access to library services in the CBD and this will take some time. Since the closure of the Central Library, in addition to locating suitable pop up spaces, we’re also working to find innovative ways we can partner with other providers to quickly offer other services like internet access, printing, WiFi, and research services at CBD locations,” said Mr Lester.

Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, who holds the community facilities portfolio, says Council has also increased capacity in our branch network of 11 community libraries.

“Central Library staff are being relocated throughout our branches, to provide additional hands on deck as well as increased opening hours at some libraries,” she said.

The Manners Street pop-up is just the first in what will be a network of library services residents can access across a range of CBD locations. Details of other pop up locations and services will be announced in the coming weeks.

Update on library services

Central Library closure FAQs

Our Central Library building is closed until further notice. The footpath around the library building and the public library car park are also closed. We’ve made the decision to close the Central Library after receiving advice from engineers that the building has structural vulnerabilities which mean it may not perform well in the event of a significant earthquake.

The Central Library is one of Wellington City’s busiest buildings, with 3000 visitors a day. We realise this closure will affect many people and we are working hard to minimise disruption. The building is not damaged but the vulnerabilities identified using new guidelines from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) are such that Wellington City Council has made the decision to close the building to the public and relocate our staff while next steps are planned. Further information (including the engineers’ report) on this decision can be found on wellington.govt.nz.

You can still use any one of our 11 branch libraries located in suburbs across Wellington – information about these can be found here. We’re working on how we can extend our branch hours and open some of our branches for additional hours during the evenings and weekends. We’re also working to set up alternative library services in the central city.

If you currently have items on loan from the Central Library, we have adjusted the due date to 1 May. You can either hold on to the item for now or return it to one of our other branches. We won’t charge you a fee if you return items to another branch.

If you prefer to return books in the central city, we have set up a small returns box in the ground floor reception area of the Wellington City Council building at 101 Wakefield Street. This is an interim measure until we can get a larger returns area set up. This is only for book returns at this stage and is available from Monday-Friday 7.30am–5.20pm.

We are working on ways to make the Central Library’s collection available while the building is closed and will make further information on this available via this website and social media. In the meantime, collections of the Central Library are not displayed on our online catalogues. If you want to reserve items from another branch library,  there is currently no fee for this service.

We have set up a library desk in the foyer of the Wellington City Council building at 101 Wakefield Street. Staff can answer your general enquiries about library services including membership registration, questions about customer accounts, placing reserves, and how to access our eLibrary resources.

Update:  There will be extended opening hours at Newtown, Karori, Brooklyn, Kilbirnie and Johnsonville libraries on Saturday 30 March and 6 April. Temporary opening hours are:

  • Karori and Johnsonville: 9am-5pm
  • Newtown and Kilbirnie 10am-5pm
  • Brooklyn: 10am-2pm

This is just a small first step to help people affected by the central library closure to access library services in their community.

We know that customers will also want to hear about the other tenants in the Central Library building – the Citizens Advice Bureau and Clarks Cafe:

  • from 25 March 2019, services of the Citizens’ Advice Bureau are available from Wellington City Council’s ground floor foyer, 101 Wakefield Street. You can reach them on 04 472-2466 or via cab.org.nz
  • Clark’s Café has also closed. Wellington City Council staff are talking with them about suitable alternative premises.

If you have any questions about library services or your library card details, please email us.

 

Meri Kirihimete from WCL’s Library Manager

Kia ora koutou
2018 has been another busy and exciting year at Wellington City Libraries. From Virtual Reality to Crafternoons, Creative Writing Workshops to Let’s go Lego, we’ve had a year jam-packed with interesting activities and events. This year we’ve been delighted to start a number of new programmes including Code Club, which has been the subject of great feedback from kids and parents alike.

A particular highlight for me was marking 125 years of Suffrage. The banners in the Central Library entrance, voting booths, and 1893-esque photos taken by staff gave the whole event a feeling of excitement and importance.

2018 has seen us break ground on Waitohi, the new Johnsonville Library and Community Hub. From small beginnings early in the year, the new building is now flying up. Waitohi will have a dedicated Makerspace and we’ll be running lots of interesting programmes there. I’m looking forward to seeing it open this time next year, and the staff can’t wait to show everyone the new spaces and reimagined precinct.

Having taken over the role of Library Manager in June, I would also like to thank our previous Library Manager Chris Hay. Chris did a wonderful job of managing Wellington City Libraries over the previous 2 1/2 years, and is now enjoying the role of Manager of Tūranga, the new Central Library in Christchurch.

Our library never (or hardly ever) sleeps! We added more than 86,000 new items into our collections, and have been privileged to have 2.6 million people through our doors this year so far. Thank you all for continuing to be such enthusiastic library users!

We hope you have a wonderful festive season, and look forward to seeing you all again in 2019.

Ngā mihi nui,
Laurinda

It’s Christmas Storytime Time Again!

Deck the Halls with Books of Jolly! Fa la la la la….

Christmas Storytimes are back!

Dust of your jingle bells, catch a sleigh ride, and follow the reindeer footprints into your local library for fun family storytimes to get your into the festival Christmas spirit.

These storytimes will be filled with stories and songs for the Christmas season, and are suitable for families with children of all ages. Come along in a Christmas costume, or your coziest pyjamas!

All storytimes start at 6pm and run for 45mins.

When and Where:

Monday 17th December

Brooklyn, Cummings Park (Ngaio), and Miramar Library,

Tuesday 18th December

Central Library, Children’s section

Thursday 20th December

Wadestown, Karori, Khandallah, Mervyn kemp (Tawa) and Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Libraries, and Island Bay Community Centre

Friday 21st December

Newtown and Johnsonville Libraries

These are free events, and bookings aren’t required.