An Audience With…Jon Drypnz

massage 3Jon is one of the artists behind the collaborative zine ‘Massage’ – an atmospheric urban art/graffiti zine. Find out more about Jon and his work on his website. Thanks for answering our questions Jon! 

Describe an average day:

A bus ride to Wadestown. Then cooking and delivering food. After this, you would find me in my studio drawing and painting. And if it is an extra lucky day I would probably be painting some walls with friends.

Describe your work:

You could maybe describe my work as ‘Post Graffiti Pop Surrealism, and I depict the notion of disevolved humans.  I feel like most humans are ignorant to the world around them, and lack simple self care. I believe this can be seen in most people, in yourself, I know I see it in myself.  It seems to be a universal human characteristic. This concept can also be perceived as a reflection of how I understand modern society. However, when you see my work, you may not instantly see this as an obvious regergitation of this understanding, because I want to poke a little bit of fun at our own demise.

massage

How did you first get into zines? 

It was a bit accidental. Our zine ‘Massage’ was based on creating a collective portfolio with some friends. It feels more like a collection of our work rather than a zine, which seems to be appealing to a wide audience at the moment.

What do you like about zines?

I guess like most people I like the fact that they are an easy and cheap way of sharing your personal ideas / intrests.

Is there anything you don’t like about zines as a medium?

I think a vast majority of them can be very similar.

massage 6How do you get inspiration for a zine?

We just produce work without focusing too much on the outcome, the outcome is not our main goal. The process of creating content, that then might happen to be used, is what matters the most.

Tell us about some of our favorite zine…

I do not really have a particular one. I do like Ed Templeton’s work. It is the photography and social commentary ones in particular that usually grab my attention, or zines about strange cats, especially the ones done by Wellington locals, Heather and Zach.

Do you have any last words?

I would have a single little man floating cross-legged, knowing all that he surrounds. His expression would be of sombre recognition of his surroundings, but with a hint of realization that it would all turn to custard at any moment.  He would be a simple fellow with a head larger than it should be because he began to think he knew everything once, and even though he knew better now, it was like his mother used to say  ‘Do that any longer dear and it will stay like that’. 

He will then sit hovering over the places where he wished he could always be, next to streams and beaches on the signs that reminded him of where those places were. 

He would be human but simplified, he would be human but his humanity has left him, he would be human if only he could remember what it was he was meant to do, he would be human if only it was that simple.

An Audience With…Hayden Currie

BookHayden produces the awesome zine comic ‘Book’ along with Matt Henley and James Rowsell. We have numbers one and three of Book in the zine library waiting eagerly for you to discover (sorry we have no idea what happened to two!). Thanks for answering our questions Hayden!

Describe an average day:

Since I’ve got a new job I wake up really early. My current job is pretty brainless; I just have to stick posters around the city. I only focus on getting them straight. Before the zine fest I was working very hard on Book, our latest zine. We really wanted to get the zine finished and it was hard work but lots of fun. Soon after the zine fest I started this new job, so I have been really tired for the last few weeks because I did not get a chance to rest in between. I tend to do some illustrations before going to work. To do so I have to wake up really early. But I think it is really important for me to draw, even if I need to wake up so early.

Describe your work:

I would say that it is mainly a satire or really crude humour. For example, the stuff in Book is a kind of cartoony and funny as well as a raw critique of our society.  But I think other people would be better than me at describing my work.

How did you first get into zines?

It was a bit accidental. James and I started to print out our first zine in an A5 format because it was cheaper. Then we sold it at the 2008 zine festival and it went really well. So I guess we just wanted to make a comic and distribute it in a cheap way and the result was a zine.

What do you like about zines?

I really like the fact that they are small and easy to carry. They are a great cheap form of showing your own work. The zines I like the best are the ones that manage to combine good illustrations and entertaining stories. Overall I tend to prefer zines with really nice art.

Is there anything you don’t like about zines as a medium?

Yes, I think many of them do not show a lot of thought about entertaining other people. It looks like they have been written as a personal diary and then turned it into a zine. The final product seems to be a compilation of personal stuff, interests and thoughts. I find this very boring and superficial.

steph book photo


How do you get inspiration for a zine?

I think I get inspiration from a basic reaction to things from popular culture. I find inspiration in everyday culture and I think most things in life are quite funny and ridiculous.  Let’s take for example Miss Green Consumer, a character from Book, who tries to make a difference through consumer’s choice. I personally find the idea that you can save the world by buying something eco-friendly quite ridiculous. Miss Green Consumer goes through a series of accidental adventures, it is actually really funny.

monsters 1

Tell us about some of your favorite zines…

Monsters by Ken Dahl is one of those zines that has a great story and really nice drawings. I highly recommend it.

– Carla

Rollerama

I went to my first Richter City roller derby bout last year and it was amazing! So you can imagine my excitment when I spied a roller derby zine to add to our collection.

by Helen Nash, Poison Arrow and Sky RockitRollerama by Helen Nash, Poison Arrow and Sky Rockit is a zine from the UK roller derby scene but it has a global focus with articles about roller derby leagues in the US, Australia and Middle East. It also has a good mix of serious and fun articles, for example a piece on the growing number of skaters dropping their derby names (Helen Wheels, Dee Dee Capitator, Acid Reign) in favour of skating under their real names; roller derby etiquette and how watching The Breakfast Club can improve your game. For sure there is a lot packed into this zine for skater girls but also heaps to interest those of us who are most happy cheering from the sideline.

Issue one of Rollerama is out on the shelves now. Does anyone know of any other cool roller derby zines? Is there a Wellington roller derby zine? ‘cos if there is we would love to get our greedy hands on it!

We talk with Wellington Zinefest organiser Kim Gruschow

Kim from the Wellington Zinefest Committee 2010 (also Lady Fest co-organiser) very kindly answered some of our questions about all things zinefest.

How did Wellington Zinefest get started?

In New Zealand there had been zine events, such as Auckland’s Small Print, Zinefestbut never much in Wellington. In  2007  Kylie Buck was working at the Wellington City Library, they had just started their zine collection and she and I organised the first Wellington Zinefest, which was also a nice welcome platform for the Library Zine Collection.

What is most challenging about organising an event like Zinefest?

There hasn’t been any notable struggles this year really, there are four of us on the team this year, three of us have organised Zinefest in previous years, so we know or at least sort-of know what to do now. The first time round was the hardest probably because everyting was new

What are zine people like to work with?

Zinemakers are all kinds of people, there are nice reserved thoughtful types, but there are also those who got into zines through punk music like me….

What cool things will be happening on the day?

There is a workshop about interesting zine construction methods and a chat about the history of zine events, distros and people in New Zealand over the last few years. The Comics Show, which is a documentary about comics in New Zealand will also be screening throughout the day, and once again the lovely folk of Wellington City Libraries will be present with some of their zine collection. There is also an afterparty at Watusi with bands Teen Hygiene, Widows, Paper Ghost & Natural Glow all of whom have close ties with zine-making and self-publishing.

Why do you think there has been such a revival of zine culture?

I think there has been a real turn towards DIY culture in general, particularly with crafts but also with music production and other creative arts. People realize that it is an easy and empowering and inexpensive way of sharing what they do. I think the presence of zines in Wellington, through the library collection, the annual Zinefest, and shops in New Zealand like the High Seas (sadly about to close ) must be very encouraging too.

Are there any zines you are hanging out to see/buy at the Fest?

I’m looking forward to the third Book, a comic made here in Wellington which is being unleashed at Zinefest. Infinity Bag has new work that I am really excited about seeing too.

Thanks Kim!

Wellington Zinefest Committee 2010. Left to right:  Matt Whitwell, Bryce Galloway, Claire Harris and Kim Gruschow
Wellington Zinefest Committee 2010. Left to right: Matt Whitwell, Bryce Galloway, Claire Harris and Kim Gruschow


Wellington Zinefest THIS Saturday!

Stalls at the zinefest 2009News on the street is that this zinefest will be the best one yet! There will be an opportunity to make your own zine, zine/comic movies to watch and of course many many awesome zines and CDs to buy – including the world’s smallest zine!
We are super-duper excited to be bringing zines from our collection of over 1,000 to join in the fun and creating a comfy reading area for you to relax and recover from all the DIY fun.  If you are gonna be there this Saturday, make sure to visit Jeremy, Vita and I in the zine reading area.

Save the date

It’s nearly Wellington Zinefest time again! zinefest picSo make a note of this date : Saturday November 20th at Mighty Mighty from 12-5pm.

If you haven’t been before – Zinefest is a market day where you can peruse and purchase an array of local, national and international zines.

It will be cool I promise! Sponsored once again by Wellington City Libraries 🙂

Zines: An Audience with… Yelz

Yelz-interviewSo it’s been a looong time since our last zine interview, but Carla was lucky enough to catch up with Yelz recently (of Around 21 fame) and asked him a few ziney questions.

Describe an average day:

After a hearty and oaty breakfast with lots of honey and raisins I tend to doodle some stickers to loosen me up and prep me for the day.

If I’m working a full day at ‘work’ I usually don’t get too much drawing or painting done, and I spend the day daydreaming about what I want to be doing the rest of the week. This might involve looking for walls to paint, and sketching and painting if I have a commission or there’s a show coming up.  I like street-art missions the best during summer and tend to paint more in the studio during winter.

How did you first get into zines?

I don’t know if I’m that ‘into’ zines yet. Lately my girlfriend has been getting them out of the library though, and she has great taste so they are a growing sensation. I get very excited about the little wee booklets now.
Also this year my friend drypnz started creating his ‘massage’ zines with PNTR. This immediately spoke out to me and I realised I had something public and personal to illustrate as well, so the zine process began.

What do you like about zines?

Raw thoughts, poetry, pictures and doodles

Is there anything you don’t like about zines as a medium?

No.

How do you get inspiration for a zine?

I have to feel like something that I’m doing is vital to public interest or appeal, or to my own I guess. For “around” it was very easy to get inspired, when your doing an arty info zine about endangered animals, those feeling fuel you through the process pretty easily. I’d like to keep collecting data and doing sketches, and do an ‘around’ zine perhaps for every country I reside in for a while. It seems it’s a good way to learn about a place and its natural history.

Tell us about some of our favorite zines…

There’s some pretty cool zines lying around at the mo –
‘The Ultimate questions’ – a collection of humorous and sadistic Kiwi collages.
‘Massage magazine’ filled with the best upcoming NZ street artists, photographers and the like
‘The weakly mushroom’ is also present in my room, filled with philosophical thoughts and doodles.

And there’s some issues of  ‘around’ left, if you would like a copy send me a mail at holla@ilikeyelz.co.nz.

Kia ora.

Thanks for the ad!!

Yelz

Around 21 by Yelz

A brand new addition to our zine collection is Around 21 by the very around21a covertalented Yelz. Yelz moved to New Zealand a few years ago and quickly found a strong connection with native birds. He started to illustrate them with an amazingly unique style. The first page of this zine has a listing of all NZ’s native birds that are quickly disappearing. This zine is beautiful and meaningful. I wonder if Yelz knows how highly talented he is and how moving his art can be. This is for sure another Librarians’ choice!

By Carlita

Check out more of his amazing work here.

Fred’s Fair

Fred's Fair posterLooking for something cool to do this Saturday? Well then, you should pop along to Fred’s Fair. I’m not sure if Fred himself will be there, but a diverse range of artists (including some well known zinesters) will be!

The fair is a collaboration between the Adam Art Gallery and the Frederick Street Sound and Light Exploration Society and was put together to pay tribute to musicians and artists who are committed to the production of the ‘object’ as a means of communication and connection to the community. Understandably, the ‘object’ is something that we ziney folk are very fond of!

So come and join in the festivities as local musicians, writers, artists, poets and publishers join together to present their wares.

Frederick Street Sound and Light Exploration Society
46 Frederick Street, Wellington
Saturday 9 October 2010
1-4pm

(Amazing Poster Art by Kerry Ann Lee)

Hello Sandwich!

Hello Sandwich: Tokyo Guide by Ebony Bizys

When I found this zine it already had a “Librarian’s choice” sticker on it and it definitively deserves it!HelloSandwich1

This little zine is really informative, so if you are planning to go to Tokyo or you know someone heading in that direction, Hello Sandwich is “the guide” to read.

For every neighborhood that the zine covers there is a small map of the area as well as a concise description of where to go and why.

Also, if you do not know any Japanese do not panic because Hello Sandwich will provide you with a list of survival phrases.

This zine is super kawaii and really useful.

If you like the zine you will probably enjoy the blog too.

Carlita