Recent Parenting picks

It’s been a little while since our last picks of the parenting books, so we’ve included a few excellent titles we couldn’t go past from slightly further back as well as some wonderful new titles for you to browse. First up, the amazing Emily Writes! Plus the NZ Birthday Cake Book, and Scotty and Stacey Morrison’s Māori at home.

Syndetics book coverRants in the dark : from one tired mama to another / Emily Writes.
“Popular blogger Emily Writes gives words of encouragement to sleep-deprived parents everywhere. With two small boys, both non-sleepers, Emily finds herself awake in the wee small hours night after night. Her writing is often done then, and she offers her own often hilarious and always heart-warming experiences to other exhausted parents. She describes the frustrations as well as the tender moments of real parenting, as opposed to what you thought it was going to be like, or what well-meaning advice-givers tell you it should be like. A must-have for all new parents and parents-to-be. A lovely gift package.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe great New Zealand birthday cake book / cake designer Jazmine Nixon ; recipes Dean Brettschneider ; project editor Wendy Nixon.
“The Great New Zealand Birthday Cake Book features 80 memory-making cakes with a stunning range of creations to suit any occasion. From bears, boats and ballerinas to pigs, pirates and princesses – and even the latest in emojis – The Great New Zealand Birthday Cake Book has the perfect cake for everyone. The book is designed to guide you step-by-step through all the basics with plenty of practical design and decorating tips. A laminated A1 template sheet tucked into the back cover of the book will help you create any cake you desire. We’ve even created some spectacular looking cakes for adults to further broaden appeal, so with 80,000 birthdays celebrated each week in New Zealand there is sure to be a cake to delight everyone.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Scotty and Stacey Morrison.
“An introduction to the Mori language … covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThings that helped : essays / Jessica Friedmann.
“Through the tide of hormones ebbing and flowing my body, and the little runnels of blood and the sour tang of my breasts, I lay awake, listening, and thinking of breath and of water. I had broken my relationship with sleep. In this stunning collection, Jessica Friedmann navigates her journey through postpartum depression after the birth of her son, Owen. Drawing on critical theory, popular culture, and personal experience, her wide-ranging essays touch on class, race, gender, and sexuality, as well as motherhood, creativity, and mental illness. Occasionally confronting, but always powerfully moving and beautifully observed, Things That Helped charts Jessica’s return into the world- a slow and complex process of reassembling what depression fractured and sometimes broke.” (Syndetics summary)

Overdrive cover How to DAD, Volume 2, Jordan Watson (eBook)
“OK, hurry up and grab me. We don’t have long before the publishers realise I’m not one of those fancy parenting-help people. In here, you’ll find some sort-of helpful tips, some pictures, some words and a few crack-up dad tales. I might not be a fancy parenting person, but I am a black belt in Dadding. Yes, that’s a thing. It’s totally a thing. I’m still making silly parenting videos, I’m still non-PC and I’m still a DAD. This is How to DAD: Volume 2. Back of book bit: DONE.”(Overdrive description)

Syndetics book coverThe single dad’s guide to the galaxy : parenting in the real world / Roger McEwan.
“‘I’ve experienced all the different roles you have to play when there’s nobody else around: a parent, a dad, a father, a stand-in mum, a confidant, always a butler or maid, a teacher and, most crucially, a friend.’In this enlightening but also very practical book, Roger McEwan shares the lessons he’s learned from years as a solo dad.It is not, he insists, a self-help book. But amidst the rich, always fascinating, often hilarious experiences of his times with his two children are dozens and dozens of useful pieces of advice for parents – from developing a great relationship with your ex (if you can) to letting the children pick the clothes they want to wear, teaching them to cook, and acknowledging that changing a toilet roll is too complex for anyone under the age of eighteen to understand” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverParenting through the storm : find help, hope, and strength when your child has psychological problems / Ann Douglas.
“Raising a child or teenager with a psychological condition is a “perfect storm” of stress, sadness, and uncertainty. How can you find the best treatments and help your child overcome emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges–while keeping yourself and your family strong? As a parent, you may feel isolated and alone, but the reality is that a lot of families are in the same boat. Ann Douglas knows firsthand just how daunting it can be. In this compassionate and empowering guide, she combines the vital lessons she has learned with vivid stories from other parents and advice from leading psychologists. The book cuts through the often-confusing clinical jargon and speaks from the heart about what matters most: the well-being of your child.” (Syndetics summary)

Pasefika eBooks you can borrow anytime

Need a good read? Including Albert Wendt and Selina Tusitala Marsh, here are just a few eBook titles to whet your appetite. Sign up to Overdrive and get started borrowing…

Overdrive cover Nuanua, Albert Wendt (eBook)
“Edited by Albert Wendt and copublished the University of Hawaii Press, Nuanua is an anthology of short stories, extracts from novels, and poems written since 1980 in the Pacific Islands. It remains an essential resource for teachers of Pacific literature.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Whetu Moana, Robert Sullivan (eBook)
“Whetu Moana is the first anthology of contemporary Polynesian poetry in English edited by Polynesians. It collects poems written over the last twenty years from more than 60 poets in Aotearoa, Hawaii, Tonga, Samoa, the Cook Islands, Niue and Rotuma. Well-known poets like Hone Tuwhare, Alistair Campbell and Haunani-Kay Trask are joined by talented young voices, the poets appearing in alphabetical order in a way that presents both an overall Polynesian identity and a focus on individual style. Traditional laments mix with street-smart rap rhythms; images of seascapes and landscapes mingle with shots of urban slums. Political anger is a powerful force in these poems but many are personal and particular. Whetu Moana reveals an active, changing, varied, creative scene, which confronts both a complex colonial past and a fast-moving global present with energy, courage and vitality.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Dream Fish Floating, Karlo Mila (eBook)
“Professor Konai Helu Thaman (Acting Deputy Vice Chancellor, and UNESCO Chair in teacher education & culture – The University of the South Pacific) says this about the collection: This is a refreshing and welcome addition to the growing list of women’s writing in Oceania. Karlo draws wisdom and compassion from her ancestral cultures but is not constrained by them. Honest and unafraid, she has spread her net wide in order to capture the many concerns that many people are grappling with as they face the realities of a globalised and impersonal world. Written with passion, persistence and sensitivity, her poems are insightful, challenging and sometimes provocative. This book should inspire others, especially women, to share their experiences with the rest of the world.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Adventures of Vela, Albert Wendt (eBook)
“Journey through the many stories and worlds of the immortal Vela – Vela, so red and ugly at birth they called him the Cooked; Vela the lonely admirer of pigs and the connoisseur of feet; Vela the lover of song maker Mulialofa the Boneman. Follow him down through the centuries on his travels, encountering the single-minded society of the Tagata-Nei and the Smellocracy of Olfact. Accompany him, too, as he recounts the stories of Lady Nafanua, the fearsome warrior queen, before whose powers travelling chroniclers still bow down today.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Ancestry, Albert Wendt (eBook)
“Albert Wendt’s new collection of short stories explores the nature of family, tradition and culture through the eyes of those seemingly caught between the realities of modern contemporary life and the ancestral ties of their heritage. With a deft touch, he draws us into his characters’ lives and with equal parts wisdom and wit, he exposes them to us. This is a masterful meditation on the ties that bind people together across time and place.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Fast Talking PI, Selina Tusitala Marsh (eBook)
“Fast Talking PI is the first ‘singular, confident and musical’ collection of poetry by Auckland writer Selina Tusitala Marsh. ‘Tusitala’ means writer of tales in Samoan, and Marsh here lives up to her name with stories of her life, her family, community, ancestry, and history. Her poetry is sensuous and strong, using lush imagery, clear rhythms and repetitions to power it forward. The list poem is a favourite style, but she also writes with a Pacific lyricism entirely her own. Fast Talking PI is structured in three sections, ‘Tusitala (personal), ‘Talkback’ (political and historical) and ‘Fast Talking PI’ (already a classic). In poems like ‘Guys Like Gauguin’ she writes as a ‘calabash breaker’, fighting back against historic injustices; but in other poems she explores the idea of the calabash as the honoured vessel for identity and story. Ultimately, though, Marsh exhorts herself to ‘be nobody’s darling’, as a writer she is a self-proclaimed ‘darling in the margins’, and Fast Talking PI proves it – a generous work that will thrill readers; ‘a map in our arms / to get us over the reef’; and a tremendous first book.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Whispers and Vanities, Tamasailau M. Suaalii-Sauni (eBook)
“This collection of essays and selected poetry responds to an address on Samoan religious culture given by Samoa’s Head of State, His Highness Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese Ta’isi Tupuola Tufuga Efi, to the 2009 Parliament of the World’s Religions. The address challenges some fundamental aspects of and assumptions in modern Samoan indigenous religious culture. The essays and poetry form a carefully woven critique, from within and outside Samoa, of aspects of Samoa’s religious and cultural values.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature, Jane Stafford (eBook)
“‘What, after all, is the truth of a place that has only just been worked into language?’ From Polynesian Mythology to the Yates’ Garden Guide, from Allen Curnow to Alice Tawhai, from Jessie Mackay to Alison Wong, from Julius Vogel to Albert Wendt, from the letters of Wiremu Te Rangikaheke to the notebooks of Katherine Mansfield – Maori, Pakeha, Pasifika, and Asian New Zealanders have struggled for two and a half centuries to work the English language into some sort of truth about this place. The Auckland University Press Anthology of New Zealand Literature brings together for the first time in one volume this country’s major writing, from the earliest records of exploration and encounter to the globalised, multicultural present. Editors Jane Stafford and Mark Williams range across novels and stories, poems and plays, letters and diaries, comics and songs to collect the defining stuff of our literary heritage. The contents will delight and provoke: Erewhon and The Heart of the Bush; Man Alone and ‘No Ordinary Sun’; The God Boy and Hicksville; ‘The Gumboot Song’ and The Vintner’s Luck. Through an imaginative selection and illuminating introductions, Stafford and Williams provide new paths into our writing and our country. For students and readers, at home and overseas, the Anthology of New Zealand Literature will be the indispensable introduction for years to come to what’s worth reading and why.” (Overdrive description)

Featured books: The history of science

The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science.
— Albert Einstein

Syndetics book coverThe age of wonder : how the Romantic generation discovered the beauty and terror of science / Richard Holmes.The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science
“Shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize and winner of the Royal Society Prize for Science Books, Richard Holmes’s dazzling portrait of the age of great scientific discovery is a groundbreaking achievement. The book opens with Joseph Banks, botanist on Captain Cook’s first Endeavour voyage, who stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769 fully expecting to have located Paradise. Back in Britain, the same Romantic revolution that had inspired Banks was spurring other great thinkers on to their own voyages of artistic and scientific discovery – astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical – that together made up the ‘age of wonder’. In this breathtaking group biography, Richard Holmes tells the stories of the period’s celebrated innovators and their great scientific discoveries: from telescopic sight to the miner’s lamp, and from the first balloon flight to African exploration.” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverNewton and the counterfeiter : the unknown detective career of the world’s greatest scientist / Thomas Levenson.
“In 1695, Isaac Newton—already renowned as the greatest mind of his age—made a surprising career change. He left quiet Cambridge, where he had lived for thirty years and made his earth-shattering discoveries, and moved to London to take up the post of Warden of His Majesty’s Mint.Newton was preceded to the city by a genius of another kind, the budding criminal William Chaloner. Thanks to his preternatural skills as a counterfeiter, Chaloner was rapidly rising in London’s highly competitive underworld, at a time when organized law enforcement was all but unknown and money in the modern sense was just coming into being. Then he crossed paths with the formidable new warden. In the courts and streets of London—and amid the tremors of a world being transformed by the ideas Newton himself had set in motion—the two played out an epic game of cat and mouse.” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverThe immortal life of Henrietta Lacks / Rebecca Skloot.The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
“Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells — taken without her knowledge in 1951 — became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverThe ghost map : the story of London’s most terrifying epidemic–and how it changed science, cities, and the modern world / Steven Johnson.
“From Steven Johnson, the dynamic thinker routinely compared to James Gleick, Dava Sobel, and Malcolm Gladwell, The Ghost Map is a riveting page-turner about a real-life historical hero, Dr. John Snow. It’s the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure — garbage removal, clean water, sewers — necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure. As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action-and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time.” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverThe philosophical breakfast club : four remarkable friends who transformed science and changed the world / Laura J. Snyder.
“The Philosophical Breakfast Club recounts the life and work of four men who met as students at Cambridge University: Charles Babbage, John Herschel, William Whewell, and Richard Jones. Recognizing that they shared a love of science (as well as good food and drink) they began to meet on Sunday mornings to talk about the state of science in Britain and the world at large. Inspired by the great 17th century scientific reformer and political figure Francis Bacon ‘another former student of Cambridge’ the Philosophical Breakfast Club plotted to bring about a new scientific revolution. And to a remarkable extent, they succeeded, even in ways they never intended.” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverThe fossil hunter : dinosaurs, evolution, and the woman whose discoveries changed the world / Shelley Emling.The Fossil Hunter: Dinosaurs, Evolution and the Woman Whose Discoveries Changed the World
“Mary Anning was only twelve years old when, in 1811, she discovered the first dinosaur skeleton — of an ichthyosaur — while fossil hunting on the cliffs of Lyme Regis, England. Until Mary’s incredible discovery, it was widely believed that animals did not become extinct. The child of a poor family, Mary became a fossil hunter, inspiring the tongue-twister, ‘She Sells Sea Shells by the Seashore’. She attracted the attention of fossil collectors and eventually the scientific world. Once news of the fossils reached the halls of academia, it became impossible to ignore the truth. Mary’s peculiar finds helped lay the groundwork for Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution, laid out in his On the Origin of Species. Darwin drew on Mary’s fossilized creatures as irrefutable evidence that life in the past was nothing like life in the present. A story worthy of Dickens, The Fossil Hunter chronicles the life of this young girl, with dirt under her fingernails and not a shilling to buy dinner, who became a world-renowned paleontologist.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIngenious pursuits : building the scientific revolution / Lisa Jardine.
“In this fascinating look at the European scientific advances of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, historian Lisa Jardine demonstrates that the pursuit of knowledge occurs not in isolation, but rather in the lively interplay and frequently cutthroat competition between creative minds. The great thinkers of that extraordinary age, including Isaac Newton, Johannes Kepler, and Christopher Wren, are shown in the context in which they lived and worked. We learn of the correspondences they kept with their equally passionate colleagues and come to understand the unique collaborative climate that fostered virtuoso discoveries in the areas of medicine, astronomy, mathematics, biology, chemistry, botany, geography, and engineering. Ingenious Pursuits brilliantly chronicles the true intellectual revolution that continues to shape our very understanding of ourselves, and of the world around us.” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverGalileo’s daughter : a historical memoir of science, faith and love / Dava Sobel.
“Inspired by a long fascination with Galileo, and by the remarkable surviving letters of Galileo’s daughter, a cloistered nun, Dava Sobel has written a biography unlike any other of the man Albert Einstein called “the father of modern physics – indeed of modern science altogether.” Galileo’s Daughter also presents a stunning portrait of a person hitherto lost to history, described by her father as ‘a woman of exquisite mind, singular goodness, and most tenderly attached to me’. The son of a musician, Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) tried at first to enter a monastery before engaging the skills that made him the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. Most sensationally, his telescopes allowed him to reveal a new reality in the heavens and to reinforce the astounding argument that the Earth moves around the Sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest. Of Galileo’s three illegitimate children, the eldest best mirrored his own brilliance, industry, and sensibility, and by virtue of these qualities became his confidante.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRosalind Franklin : the dark lady of DNA / Brenda Maddox.
“In 1962, Maurice Wilkins, Francis Crick, and James Watson received the Nobel Prize, but it was Rosalind Franklin’s data and photographs of DNA that led to their discovery. Brenda Maddox tells a powerful story of a remarkably single-minded, forthright, and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.” (Goodreads review)

Overdrive cover Hidden Figures, Margot Lee Shetterly (eBook)
“Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets and astronauts into space. Among these problem solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly these overlooked math whizzes had shots at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia, and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black West Computing group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War and complete domination of the heavens.” (Goodreads review)

Syndetics book coverLost history : the enduring legacy of Muslim scientists, thinkers, and artists / Michael Hamilton Morgan ; [foreword by King Abdullah II of Jordan].
“In an era when the relationship between Islam and the West seems mainly defined by mistrust and misunderstanding, we often forget that for centuries Muslim civilization was the envy of the world. […] Michael Hamilton Morgan reveals how early Muslim advancements in science and culture lay the cornerstones of the European Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and modern Western society. As he chronicles the Golden Ages of Islam, beginning in 570 a.d. with the birth of Muhammad, and resonating today, he introduces scholars like Ibn Al-Haytham, Ibn Sina, Al-Tusi, Al-Khwarizmi, and Omar Khayyam, towering figures who revolutionized the mathematics, astronomy, and medicine of their time and paved the way for Newton, Copernicus, and many others. And he reminds us that inspired leaders from Muhammad to Suleiman the Magnificent and beyond championed religious tolerance, encouraged intellectual inquiry, and sponsored artistic, architectural, and literary works that still dazzle us with their brilliance. Lost History finally affords pioneering leaders with the proper credit and respect they so richly deserve.” (Syndetics summary)

Treaty talks at Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui in April/May

Wellington Treaty Network has joined with Wellington City Libraries in 2017 to host three events in April and May to commemorate the signing of Te Tiriti in Wellington Harbour, 1840.

We thank Robyn Kahukiwa for her kind permission to use her image created for the Haeata Collective exhibition at the City Gallery, 1990

We thank Robyn Kahukiwa for her kind permission to use her  image created for the Haeata Collective exhibition at the City Gallery, 1990.

The programme will be:

Rangtiratanga in reverse : the Government’s review of Te Ture Whenua Māori by Liz Mellish and Morrie Love

Friday 28 April, 12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Liz Mellish is chair of Palmerston North  Māori Reserve Trust, and Morrie Love is chair of the Wellington Tenths Trust.

Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill [update], is in its final step, due to become an act at the end of this month. We are pleased to host Liz Mellish, Federation of Māori Authorities representative on an advisory committee for the establishment of  the Māori Land Service,  and Morrie Love, who will attempt to guide us through the complex issues surrounding the  Te Ture Whenua Bill/Act.

Changing the narrative, the story of Māori law and Treaty of Waitangi claims and settlement, with Carwyn Jones

Friday 5 May,  12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Carwyn Jones, of Ngāti Kahungunu and Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki iwi,  is a senior law lecturer at Victoria University. His area of expertise is Te Tiriti O Waitangi, Māori Customary Law and Māori Land Use. We look forward to an opportunity to learn of the latest developments  on the claims and settlement processes.

Here is a link to Carwyn’s book, published recently in 2016:

Vic Uni Book CoverNew treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“While Indigenous peoples face the challenges of self-determination in a postcolonial world, New Treaty, New Tradition provides a timely look at how the resolution of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims continues to shape the culture of all who are involved – Maori and government alike.” (Syndetics summary)

Te Tiriti in schools and the community  :  new resources to support engagement with the Treaty ; a talk by Tamsin Hanly and Jen Margaret

Friday 12 May, 12.30-1.15pm
Children’s and Young Adults’ area, Ground Floor, Central Library

Jen Margaret is an author and a very respected and committed presenter of Treaty workshops, and workshops for organisational change.

Here is a link to her book Working as Allies: supporters of indigenous justice reflect on the Library Catalogue.

Tamsin Hanly will shortly launch her latest publication in the field of New Zealand education, and her colourful website includes: A Critical guide to Māori and Pākehā histories of Aotearoa New Zealand

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What’s on at ComicFest 2017?

Love comics? Come along to ComicFest 2017, Saturday May the 6th at the Central library.

Comics go to school

Sponsored by The Ministry of Education

Over the course of its hundred-year history, the School Journal has included work from New Zealand’s greatest authors and illustrators. In recent times, this has included comics from the likes of Dylan Horrocks, Ant Sang, and Andrew Burdan. Visit the Central Library to view a few highlights, new and old, in the lead up to ComicFest.

Comic drawing competition

On Free Comic Book Day, come to the library and draw a comic story using just 4 panels and you could win an armful of comics! Feel free to come to Sarah Laing’s character creation workshop on Saturday morning for inspiration. Entry forms available from Central Library on the day. All ages and drawing levels welcome.

9.30am onwards | Free Comic Book Day

Sponsored by GRAPHIC comics

Grab some free comics from us and chat comics with our librarians at the Central Library!

Comics from all different publishers and for all age ranges are included in the selections, so there will be something for everyone. Thanks to Graphic for providing us with all the awesome free comics!

10am–11.00 | Workshop: Comics character development workshop with Sarah Laing

Mezzanine Meeting Room, Central Library

Sponsored by Wellington City Libraries

Who’s going to star in your comic? A superhero, a cybernaut, a talking sausage or a kid like you? Come to this comics workshop and we’ll work on your character, from its backstory to the way it’s drawn. Bring your own pens and pencils, and we’ll have mountains of paper. Work on different expressions and poses, experimenting with line weight and form. We’ll put them in some tricky situations to see how their story plays out in panels. All drawing levels welcome!

10.30am–11.30am | National Library: From where we started: Reading New Zealand’s comic history

Session held at the Alexander Turnbull Library to enable access to heritage collections

Sponsored by Alexander Turnbull library

The Alexander Turnbull Library collects New Zealand’s documentary heritage and is home to a comic treasure trove. From early newspaper strips and children’s annuals, through to contemporary graphic novels and zines, the Library offers a window into this unique and fascinating part of our history.

Join research librarian Hannah Benbow for a hands on look at almost a century of New Zealand comics.

11am-12noon | Thunderbirds Are Go: Re-imagining the much loved brand for a new audience

Young Adult Ground Floor Area

Sponsored by Pukeko Pictures

Ben Milsom, Production Designer and Episodic Director for Thunderbirds Are Go takes you through the process of re-imagining the 1960’s classic for a new generation. Ben will guide you through the unique production process of this multi-media (CGI animation with live action miniature sets) series paying tribute to the legacy of model locations from the classic series.

Ben will showcase the inspiration taken from the original series and discuss how Thunderbirds Are Go was brought to life in animation, toys and comics through slides and video and present an opportunity to have your questions answered with a Q&A section. All attendees of this presentation go in to a draw to win a family pass to the Miniatures Stage Tour: Thunderbirds Are Go from Weta Studio Tours.

12noon–1pm | Panel: Creating graphic novels with Sarah Laing and Dylan Horrocks

Young Adult Ground Floor area

Sponsored by NZ Book Council

Both Dylan Horrocks and Sarah Laing have authored popularly received and well regarded long form graphic novels including recent publications ‘Mansfield and Me,’ and ‘Sam Zabel and the Magic Pen.’
This informal, personal conversation will highlight the creative process involved in making a graphic novel, but also examine publishing, the graphic novel format and comics in New Zealand.

1pm–1.30 | Cosplay competition

Sponsored by Unity books

Dress up as your favourite character for a shot at a comic prize! There are prizes for all categories, including children, teens and adults.

1.30pm–2.30pm | Panel: A Wellington view – Local Cartoonists

Young Adult Ground Floor Area

What’s it like to be making comics in NZ? Join us for a discussion between local Wellington comic artists Jem Yoshioka, Giselle Clarkson and Sally Bollinger about their unique experiences making comics about life, nature, tradition, culture, and doing all this from Wellington.
Moderated by Robyn Kenealy.

2.30pm–3.30pm | Workshop: Taking your comics to the next level, with Dylan Horrocks

Mezzanine Meeting Room, Central Library

Sponsored by NZ Book Council

Gather up your comics (or that graphic novel plan) and bring them along to the Central library for a sit-down chat with Dylan. This is a chance to examine your ideas and process, to share ideas and techniques and to take things to the next level. Limited to 10 participants. Email at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz to book your place.

3.30pm–4.30pm | Panel: Should we all be writing political comics?

Young Adult Ground Floor area

Sponsored by Alexander Turnbull library

In spite of their subject matter, artistic responses to Trump and the current political climate have been witty, elegant, colourful and empowering. Join a group of panellists including Sam Orchard and Grant Buist to discuss how they have responded to recent events in their work, and the ongoing power of comics to satirise and protest. Panel discussion moderated by Hannah Benbow.

All events are free and unless stated open to participants of all ages.

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Enter our Pinterest photo competition!

Where do you read in Wellington?

From 31 March to 26 April share photos of you reading in a recognisable place in Wellington for a chance to win an Instax camera (1st place) or a $50 Typo gift voucher (2nd place).

Use the hashtag #WCLreads on your Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr or Twitter and the best photos will be pinned on our Pinterest board.

 

Terms & conditions apply:

  • This competition is open to all Wellington City Libraries members age 14 and up.
  • You may enter as many times as you like.
  • Entries will be accepted from 31st March 2017 until 26th April 2017.
  • Only entries received on or between these dates will be considered.
  • Entries must clearly show both a book (or portion of a cover, or inside pages) and a recognisable location in Wellington to be eligible.
  • Winners will be selected and notified by 3rd May 2017.
  • Wellington City Libraries will make reasonable attempts to contact the winner. Another winner will be drawn if contact cannot be made.
  • Judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  • The winning prizes cannot be exchanged for cash or similar, or another prize.
  • Entry gives permission to Wellington City Libraries to display submissions in the libraries or on library webpages and social media. No payment will be made in any such case.
  • Your contact information will be kept confidential by Wellington City Council and not disclosed or sold to any other party.

Working from home with kids? Here are some ideas…

via GIPHY

We know lots of people are working from home this week, maybe with kids stuck inside in the bad weather, with some schools and kindys still closed. To make your working life a little easier, and provide some much needed distraction for the kids so you can get things done, here are some kids’ craft ideas. Some are tricker than others, but many don’t need too much effort to get them started – we love the lego marble maze idea! So many endless permutations!

We also have kids’ craft books & audiobooks on Overdrive, as well as books that read themselves aloud to your kids on Tumblebooks (‘Readalongs’), and we’ve included a selection of these too — all you need are headphones and they’ll be captivated (quietly!).

Update:
We’ve gone ahead and created a Pinterest board with these and many more ideas — have a browse!


So, here we go:

  1. Have Lego and marbles at home? Build a Lego marble run! There are lots of complicated tutorials out there, but this one looks nice and easy, and you just tilt the board to run the marble through. Then rearrange and try again.
    Lego marble run
  2. Free colouring in pages — there are so many linked here. If your kids are school age, these could be quite good
  3. Here are some neat shoebox craft ideas. Many of these are quite complicated, and kids would need help, but the last one is a mailbox – we think this could be great! Not too much work to set up, and then kids could write and draw cards and letters back and forth. Also pictured below, make a stage! Would require some help to start, but once cut and coloured in, can be used to stage elaborate plays with all manner of toys. We think covering or gluing with wrapping paper would be a good (easy) option instead of decorating with paint
    Mailbox vl-curtain-shape
  4. Holiday cards – these could be fun to make and write?
    Here are some printable Christmas ones to colour in, but there are lots of ideas out there for all holidays — here’s a page with all the site’s printables listed by holiday — Hanukkah is coming up soon too!
  5. Blanket forts! This tutorial is actually aimed at adults, but details blanket fort construction very well, and we think would work for kids, minus perhaps the safety pins (you could substitute clothes pegs instead?). Also includes such important topics as stockpiling snacks inside your blanket fort, and the important step of giving your blanket fort a name, and creating a sign for outside it!
  6. Tumblebooks – read aloud (and other) eBooks for kids
    Give these a go. The ‘read along’ titles will read themselves aloud on any screen, and you don’t need to download them or set up with any other kind of technology — all you’ll need to do is log in with your card. Some of our picks for ‘read along’ titles are: The Paper Bag Princess and All Aboard the Dinotrain. You can also read regular chapter books (that aren’t read along titles), like Neil Gaiman’s Remember the Milk! Because they can’t be checked out to any one borrower, they’re always available online too
  7. Kids’ audiobooks on Overdrive. Many of these you can also listen to online in a browser, if you don’t have time to set up the app on your phone or device! (If you want to do this, choose the ‘advanced search’, and then filter by ‘Overdrive Listen’). Here are a few titles for kids to get you started, but have a browse! Overdrive even has some read-along eBooks too

Overdrive cover The Black Circle, (Audiobook)
“Governments were toppled and rulers were killed during the last attempt to find the lost treasure Amy and Dan Cahill are searching for—do they even stand a chance?” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Anna’s Birthday Surprise, (Read-along eBook)
“Read along with Disney! It’s Anna’s birthday and Elsa and Kristoff are determined to give her the best celebration ever, but Elsa’s icy powers may put more than just the party at risk.” (Overdrive description)

Overdrive cover Dirty Beasts, (Audiobook)
“In Dirty Beasts we meet a ghastly menagerie of wonderfully comic animals that can only have been invented by Roald Dahl. There is the toad that jumps to France—at his own peril; the pig who ponders the meaning of life; the anteater who gets the wrong end of the stick; and many more. Snigger, titter and laugh at their antics in this collection of irreverent and absurdly comic verse!” (Overdrive description)

Big Library Read with Overdrive ebooks now on!

biglibraryreadEvery three months Overdrive, one of our eBook providers, runs a ‘Big Library Read’. Described a ‘global eBook club’, the ‘big read’ allows library users the chance to borrow a certain eBook simultaneously, to be read altogether – just like you would with your book club!

This time around, we’ll be reading the #1 New York Times bestselling book This Is Where It Ends from debut author Marieke Nijkamp —  from October 13th through the 27th.

This is Where it Ends is a fictional account of a school shooting, told from four perspectives over the span of 54 harrowing minutes. Marieke provides a unique and poignant look into what it’s like to experience a school shooting through the eyes of students who are living through it in real time. This title brings to light the subject of school shootings realistically, but without graphic depictions of the violence the students experience.

Once you finish this moving book, join our discussion board to share your thoughts. Join the Big Library Read and start reading This Is Where It Ends today!

The Big Library Read runs from October 13th, to October 27th.

Overdrive cover This Is Where It Ends, by Marieke Nijkamp (eBook)
“A New York Times Bestseller! Everyone has a reason to fear the boy with the gun. 10:00 a.m. The principal of Opportunity, Alabama’s high school finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve. 10:02 a.m. The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class. 10:03 The auditorium doors won’t open. 10:05 Someone starts shooting. Told from four perspectives over the span of 54 harrowing minutes, terror reigns as one student’s calculated revenge turns into the ultimate game of survival. #1 Young Adult Debut of 2016 Winter ’15 Kids Indie Next List Goodreads YA Best Books of the Month Buzzfeed 5 YA Books You Should Be Reading This January Bustle.com 18 of 2016’s Most-Anticipated YA Novels BookRiot 15 Books out in 2016 You Should Mark Down Now” (Overdrive description)

Māori Language Week – competition for teens!

Mawhai Tuhituhi 1

Māwhai Tuhituhi online Te Reo writing competition for Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori

Hei whakanui i Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2015, kei te mahi pakiwaitara tuhituhi ā-ipurangi Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, ā, ka taea e koe e tō kura rānei he taonga te wini.

Kua oti kē i te kaituhi rongonui haere nei a Paora Tibble, te whiti tuatahi te tuhituhi, ā, māu e āpiti atu ō tuhituhi ki te pakiwaitara ia rā, hei te 27-31 o Hūrae.

Ka whiriwhirihia kotahi te whiti ia rā (tae atu ki te 200 kupu), mai i ia reanga, ka mutu hoki ngā pakiwaitara hei te ahiahi o te Paraire te 31 o Hūrae.

Ko ngā Reanga: (Kura Tuarua) te Tau 9-13

Ka whiwhi taonga te toa kaituhi, ā, mō te kura e nui ana te takiuru mai : he haki hei hoko pukapuka

Kia whai wāhi koe ki te wini, tūhono mai ā-ipurangi ka tuhituhi mai rā: wcl.govt.nz/mawhaituhi

mawhai tuhituhi 2

To celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2015, Wellington City Libraries are weaving an online story, with the chance for you and your school to win a cool prize.

Well-known author, Paora Tibble, will write the first paragraph but we need you to continue the story each day, from 27-31 July.

A paragraph (up to 200 words) will be selected each day to continue the story, and the stories will finish on Friday afternoon, 31 July.

Age Group is: Year 9-13 high school students

A prize will be awarded to an overall winner, (Samsung 7” lite tablet) and book vouchers ( worth $250.00) for the school with the most entries.

For your chance to win, join us online and weave your story: wcl.govt.nz/mawhaituhi

mawhai-carousel

Two talks: Ngā kōrero o Te Whanganui-a-Tara, the forming of this land – an iwi perspective

As well as a story competition for Teens (Māwhai Tuhituhi – test your language skills!), we have two special talks on next week at the Central Library to celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori.

We’re very lucky to have two speakers from Mana Whenua (Kura Moeahu and Neavin Broughton), who will present their stories beginning with the pūrākau of Te Whanganui-a-Tara.

Ngā kōrero o Te Whanganui-a-Tara

Both talks are on the topic of a “Sense of Place – the forming of this land: an iwi perspective”.

Tuesday 28 July, 12:30-1:30pm (Central Library)

Kura Moeahu: A sense of place; a bilingual korero: mai i ngā taniwha

He kōrero beginning with the story of Ngake and Whātaitai (bilingual).

Thursday 30 July, 12:30-1:30pm (Central Library)

Neavin Broughton: A sense of place: he whakaaro ano

He kōrero beginning with the story of Kupe (bilingual).

So, drop in to the Ground Floor of the Central Library next Tuesday or Thursday lunchtime to listen to Neavin Broughton and Kura Moeahu talk about how Wellington was formed and the meaning behind place names for mountains, rivers and our beautiful harbour. All welcome! A Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2015 event – nau mai, haere mai.