Library online numbers a turn-up for the books

With libraries reopened in the capital now, the library boffins have been crunching the numbers during the Covid-19 Alert Levels, and found online services broke every record in the book.

As the lockdown started in March, Wellington City Libraries welcomed over 1,110 new members, a 300% increase compared to 2019.

The number of people using eResources remained high throughout, averaging 10,000 eBooks issued and 5,000 reserves per week. Audiobooks averaged over 5,000 issues and 2,000 reserves per week.

Compared to early March 2019 the average number of ebooks issued was around 6,000, with 1,800 reserves. Audiobooks for the same time last year sat around 3,000 issues and 1,000 reserves.

“With Miramar Library opening 27 May, and Island Bay and He Matapihi opening 2 June, all 13 branches will have reopened – but with Level 2 restrictions there is still a lot of online activity going on,” says Laurinda Thomas, Wellington City Council’s Libraries and Community Spaces Manager.

“We are not running any face-to-face group activities under Alert Level 2, and our hours are a bit different from normal, so check our website before you visit. In the meantime, we are streaming our popular programmes such as Storytimes and Baby Rock & Rhyme, live on Facebook from Mondays to Saturdays, and the recorded Storytimes are available on the Kids pages of our website.

“We are currently planning for Alert Level 1, and we’re hoping that will see the return of many of our much loved programmes like Baby Rock & Rhyme to our libraries.”

Michelle Obama’s ‘Becoming’ was one of the most popular adult eBook and Audiobook over the past two months, and the Harry Potter series remained the most popular Audiobook for children, including the foreign language editions – although Horrid Henry was taking over from Harry in the eBooks stakes.

Such high levels of engagement with our library services during lockdown is reassuring for Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, Portfolio Leader for Libraries.

There has been a library in Wellington for over a hundred years and the record use by residents during the lockdown shows the huge value and trust Wellingtonians place in library services today. We are so lucky to have such committed staff running our city’s libraries.

“The libraries of 2020 are not just about books – it’s audio, visual, historic, futuristic, online, offline, and for public events. Now that our branches are reopening, they’re also demonstrating what an important public space they are for residents as well.”

To meet the required social distancing for staff and customers Wellington City Libraries have introduced a number of systems to adhere to the Alert Level 2 guidelines, says Mayor Andy Foster.

“We know everyone loves our libraries, but we ask visitors to limit their time to 30 minutes to let everyone have a chance to pop in while we’re still operating under Level 2 guidelines.

The Rippl app is in place too, so make sure you register through that or manually while we continue to use contact tracing systems for the health and safety of our staff and customers.”

Top 10 from Kanopy (April)

1                    Ex Libris
2                    The Dressmaker
3                    The Phone Call
4                    Carol
5                    Kedi
6                    Stash Short Film Festival: Comedy
7                    Bobbie the Bear
8                    The Trip to Spain
9                    Bauhaus: The Face of the 20th Century
10                 I Am Not Your Negro

Top 5 from Beamafilm (April)

1                    Catherine The Great
2                    Un Village Francais
3                    Book Club
4                    Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
5                    The Name of The Rose

Top 10 Adult and Children ebooks and audio (April)

ADULT EBOOKS ADULT AUDIO BOOKS
This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay Becoming by Michelle Obama
Blue Moon: Jack Reacher Series, Book 24 by Lee Child The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking by Edward Burger The Alchemist  by Paulo Coelho
Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty Present Over Perfect: Leaving Behind Frantic for a Simpler, More Soulful Way of Living by Shauna Niequist
The Dutch House by Ann Patchett Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold by Stephen Fry
Normal People by Sally Rooney Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know by Malcolm Gladwell
Welcome to the Universe: An Astrophysical Tour by Neil DeGrasse Tyson Miss Marple’s Final Cases by Agatha Christie
The Testaments: The Handmaid’s Tale Series, Book 2 by Margaret Atwood The Alice Network by Kate Quinn
Becoming by Michelle Obama Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis
The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell The Untethered Soul by Michael Singer
CHILDREN EBOOKS CHILDREN AUDIO BOOKS
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone: Harry Potter Series, Book 1 Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone: Harry Potter Series, Book 1
Horrid Henry Robs the Bank Harry Potter à L’école des Sorciers: Harry Potter Series, Book 1 (French)
Little Women: Little Women Series, Book 1 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets: Harry Potter Series, Book 2
Horrid Henry’s Underpants Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban: Harry Potter Series, Book 3
Flunked: Fairy Tale Reform School Series, Book 1 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince: Harry Potter Series, Book 6
Guts: Smile Series, Book 3 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: Harry Potter Series, Book 4
The Cupcake Club Series, Book 1 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Harry Potter Series, Book 7
Boy-Crazy Stacey: Baby-Sitters Club Graphix Series, Book 7 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix: Harry Potter Series, Book 5
Horrid Henry Tricks the Tooth Fairy Harry Potter y la piedra filosofal: Harry Potter Serie, Libro 1 (Spanish)
The Dirt Diary Series, Book 1 Big Nate in the Zone: Big Nate Series, Book 6 by Lincoln Pierce

The Beyond the Page literary festival for tamariki and their whanau – a project with Hutt City, Upper Hutt City, Wellington, Kāpiti and Porirua Libraries – is running events online this weekend.

Children can sign up to take part in a Zoom drawing class with talented comic book artist and wrestler, Michael Mulipola or join the Family Quiz on Sunday – learn more here.

William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse VC (Ngāti Tama, Ngāti Ruanui)

As ANZAC Day 2020 approaches, it is timely to revisit the life of William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse (Ngāti Tama, Ngāti Ruanui) and honour not just his distinction as the first Māori airman, but also as the first British airman to receive the award of Victoria Cross for his bravery in World War I.

Born in 1887 in Britain, Rhodes-Moorhouse and his siblings did not learn of their Māori ancestry, through his mother Mary Ann Rhodes, until 1908. Sadly, William Barnard died on 27 April 1915 after receiving horrific injuries during a successful bombing mission. However, his wife Linda, and son William Henry, followed in his footsteps and both developed a passion for flying and gained their pilot licenses in 1931.

William Barnard’s son, William Henry, joined the 601 “Millionaires” Squadron at the outbreak of World War II and received a Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) in July 1940. Sadly, he died later that year after being shot down over the English town of Tunbridge Wells.

Learn more about William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse, and his brave and fascinating family, in the document below. You will also find links to further articles, a film, and a documentary.

Ka whiti mai te rā!

Ra Vincent, Anchor Stone (2004), stone, Whairepo, The Lagoon

Whānau, friends and citizens of Te Whanganui-a-Tara,  gathered on this year’s Waitangi Day at Whairepo, The Lagoon, in front of the Wharewaka to observe and participate in the re-dedication of the punga: anchor stone, sculpted by Ra Vincent,  which formerly graced Civic Square.

Ra Vincent has blessed our city with four other public works.

Ra Vincent, Pou Whenua, (2005), stone, corner Lambton Quay and Molesworth Street
Ra Vincent, Te Waka Pou, (2007), stone, wood, bronze, corner of Oriental Parade and Herd St
Bodhi and Ra Vincent with local rangatahi, (2012) , Taranaki Street

“The Tenths Trust gifted twin 6.3-metre Pou Whenua (tribal boundary markers) designed by Te Atiawa sculptor Ra Vincent. The Pou Whenua stand as if on the former beach, symbolising upturned waka. The perimeter of the site is landscaped with plantings.”
(– From Wellington City Council)

The Waka Pou stands in Waitangi Park and commemorates migrations of Pacific Islands people and Europeans to New Zealand.

Read the full article here.

A brick sculpture was created in Vivian Street from bricks which once buried  Waimapihi Stream. These bricks were uncovered during excavations of a culvert on the site of the planned Z petrol station. Check the full article with a photo here.

Ra and his father, Bodhi Vincent, have also created a mural in Taranaki Street, with help from young people:

“The design is based on kowhaiwhai patterns that emphasise the spirit of the building’s proximity to coastal waters, and Māori as kaitiaki (guardians) of the land.” (from Wellington City Council)

Mana Whenua of Te Whanganui-a-Tara are proud to claim Ra Vincent as one of their uri – firstly for his beautiful works around the city, but also for his inclusion in the latest Oscar nominations.

His incredible achievements have been chronicled in various websites from IMDB , his personal website, to articles (here, here and here) and so many more.

Congratulations, Ra, for your second nomination for the Academy Award for Best Production Design – (following on from 2012 The Hobbit : an unexpected journey)  –  such a very proud moment for your whānau and for our city and citizens as well.

Grab a book, pull up a seat and relax in the Outdoor Reading Room

Te Ngākau Civic Square will be transformed into a giant Outdoor Reading Room stocked with decommissioned library books that readers are free to take home.

Mayor of Wellington Andy Foster in the Civic Square with the Pop Up Library

The five-week-long celebration of books will be open from 10am to 3pm Wednesday to Saturday. The first scheduled day is Wednesday 12 February, the last day will be Saturday 14 March. All days are weather dependent.

The Civic Square’s artificial turf will be reconstructed into the Outdoor Reading Room using 24 bean bags, shelves of books, outdoor umbrellas, café style tables and chairs, stools and a large kids activity table. The furniture will be a mix or red, orange, yellow, green and blue, taking inspiration from the City Gallery’s Yayoi Kusama installation in 2009.

We have provided a stock of decommissioned library books which will be regularly replenished as readers find gems to take home.

Some book-related events will also be held at the Outdoor Reading Room. These include readings from local authors involved with the New Zealand Festival, and children’s reading sessions with Wellington City Libraries.

Free daily copies of The Dominion Post, back copies of Capital magazine, Salient student magazine, as well as crayons and colouring cards will also be available.

WellingtonNZ General Manager Anna Calver says the Outdoor Reading Room will help bring vibrancy back to Civic Square.

“We expect it to be popular with a wide range of people from parents taking their children and lunchtime workers, through to those missing the Central Library and visitors to Wellington.

“The Outdoor Reading Room is the perfect place to grab a book and relax in the heart of Wellington. It also provides the opportunity for booklovers to check out the nearby galleries, cafes and shops.”

Mayor of Wellington Andy Foster in the Civic Square with the Pop Up Library

Wellington Mayor Andy Foster says the Outdoor Reading Room is a very welcome event.

“Te Ngākau literally means the ‘heart’ and events like this keep the heartbeat of Civic Square alive.  The Outdoor Reading Room will bring people back to the area to enjoy a novel pop-up library.

“Civic Square is an important location for people to mix and mingle and I know people are pining for the Central Library. We’ve worked hard on the three other city libraries and expect some decisions on the Central Library in coming months.

“But right now, all we have to do is hope Wellington’s weather is kind and then it’s time to slap on the sunscreen and get down to Te Ngākau Civic Square.”

The Te Ngākau Civic Square Outdoor Reading Room is a joint initiative between WellingtonNZ, Wellington City Council and Wellington City Libraries.

The event will be staffed by WellingtonNZ.

Apirana Taylor entertains: Waitangi Day celebrations 2020

Wellington City Libraries present two sessions with Apirana Taylor, for school-age children, at He Matapihi Molesworth Library situated on the Ground Floor, National Library of New Zealand on Thursday 6 February as part of the Waitangi Day commemorations.

11.30 am
1pm

These two sessions will fall between the National Library’s two bilingual tours of He Tohu and will complement their programme.

Waitangi Day at He Tohu – ‘Walking backwards into the Future’

Waitangi Day at He Tohu is an opportunity for you and your whānau to see the Treaty of Waitangi.

Activities will include:
– whānau and bilingual He Tohu tours
– tours of National Library digitised collections
– a reading corner with books/ comics and other Treaty resources
– film from Nga Taonga Sound and Vision, and a
– kids’ craft table with Treaty-related activities to help the new generation walk backwards into the future.

Mana Wahine readers: two unique volumes

These two readers have developed from many requests to Leonie Pihama and LindaTuhiwai Smith “to provide references or support in the area of Mana Wahine, both as theory and as lived ways of being.”

The two online readers have been produced by Te Kotahi Research Institute; supported by Ngā Pae o TeMāramatanga.

The scope of the two volumes are writings between 1987-2019, and the beautiful covers which were gifted by Robyn Kahukiwi represent ngā wāhine atua: Mahuika and Hineteiwaiwa.


Robyn Kahukiwa and Patricia Grace published the beautiful book He Wāhine Toa – and these two online readers bring other aspects to the power of women.

Please visit https://leoniepihama.wordpress.com/2020/01/07/mana-wahine-readers/ for the full description of the two volumes and thence to the digitised contents.

ComicFest 2019 – 5 minutes with Paul Diamond

ComicFest is back for 2019! On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2 to 4 of May at the National Library there will be panels, talks and workshops all day long for comic-lovers of all ages. You can also pick up a free comic from us on May the 4th and celebrate Free Comic Book Day, courtesy of GRAPHIC! For full programme click here and follow our updates on our Facebook event.

Today is the first day of ComicFest! To finish our special “5 minutes with…” feature we have Paul Diamon, the author of three books (A Fire in Your Belly, Huia 2003; Makereti: taking Māori to the World, Random House NZ 2007; and Savaged to Suit: Māori and Cartooning in New Zealand, Fraser Books 2018), and has also worked as an oral historian and broadcaster. From 2007 to 2009 Paul managed the Vietnam War Oral History Project for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. In 2017 Paul was awarded Creative New Zealand’s Berlin Writer’s Residency to complete a book about Charles Mackay, a mayor of Whanganui who was killed in Berlin in 1929. Paul Diamond appears at ComicFest with the support of the New Zealand Cartoon Archive.

Q: What first got you interested in comics?
A: I was asked to write a book about the history of Māori and cartoons. This initially focused on editorial cartoons in newspapers, but the scope was broadened to include images of Māori in other places, such as comics and graphic novels.

Q: What is your average day like?
A: Ideally, made up of coffee, collections, cartoons, cycling and cursive creation.

Q: Can you tell us about a current or recent project you’ve worked on?
A: My book, Savaged to Suit: Māori and Cartooning in New Zealand, was launched by MP Louisa Wall at the National Library in September 2018.

Q: Do you have any traditions or rituals that help you when you get to work?
A: Not really, but preceding this, my cycle along the Wellington waterfront means it’s difficult to arrive at work grumpy, even if I may be a bit puffed.

Q: Who/what is your biggest influence or inspiration?
A: Personally: my parents, Briar and Eddie Diamond, and my bicultural ancestry, which I wrote about in the acknowledgements section of Savaged to Suit.
An illustration inspiration: An exhibition I saw at the House of Illustration in London in 2016, Comix Creatrix: 100 Women Making Comics, was wonderful to experience and has stayed with me. The exhibition introduced me to artists and work I wasn’t aware of, including Jacky Fleming and her marvellous book, The Trouble With Women as well as Barbara Yelin, see below. The exhibition was also a powerful reminder that just because work by different groups may not be obvious doesn’t mean it’s not out there. Which is why books and exhibitions play an important role in bringing collections to audiences and providing context to understand them.

 Q: What or who are your favourite NZ comics or creators?
A: As part of my research it was great to find out more about the Māori who’ve worked at editorial cartoonists. It’s not a very long list: Harry Dansey, Oriwa Haddon, Mark Tapsell, Noel Cook, James Waerea, Anthony Ellison, and Sharon Murdoch. I’m also a big admirer of Murray Webb’s caricatures.

Q: What is your dream comic project?
A: A graphic novel about the story I’m going to be writing about in Berlin later this year, check it here. This is to do with the 1929 May Day riots in Berlin, in which Charles Mackay, a former mayor of Whanganui was shot. There are at least two graphic novels about the 1929 May Day riots: Babylon Berlin by Arne Jysch is a graphic novel adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s novel, Der Nasse Fisch and Jason Lutes’ Berlin series. Another inspiration for how to tell the story is Irmina, by Barbara Yelin, which I saw in the Comix Creatrix: 100 Women Making Comics exhibition in 2016. Subsequently, an English translation of Irmina was released, and I’ve been meaning to have a read. I loved the way Yelin combined images and text to bring alive a remarkable story and the history of the period leading up to the Second World War.

Q: What are you excited to share with ComicFest attendees? Just a taster!
A: I’m looking forward to yarning about how cartoons work. In my research I learned about how nothing in a cartoon is there by accident, but the layers of meaning are not always obvious. It’d also be good to talk about stereotyping in cartoons, as I’ve been reflecting on this in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks in Christchurch.

Q: If you were to enter our cosplay contest, who/what would you dress up as?
A: Not sure, but I might see if another of my inspirations, Varla Jean Merman aka Jeffery Roberson has any ideas!

You can find more about Paul online here.

ComicFest 2019 – 5 minutes with Dylan Horrocks

ComicFest is back for 2019! On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2 to 4 of May at the National Library there will be panels, talks and workshops all day long for comic-lovers of all ages. You can also pick up a free comic from us on May the 4th and celebrate Free Comic Book Day, courtesy of GRAPHIC! For full programme click here and follow our updates on our Facebook event.

ComicFest starts tomorrow! Next up on our special feature “5 minutes with…” we have Dylan Horrocks, a cartoonist best known for his graphic novel Hicksville and his scripts for the Batgirl comic book series. His works are published by the University of Auckland student magazine Craccum, Australia’s Fox Comics, the current affairs magazine New Zealand Listener from 1995 to 1997, the Canadian publishers Black Eye Comics and Drawn and Quarterly, and the American publishers Vertigo and Fantagraphics Books. He currently serialises new work online at Hicksville Comics.

Q: What first got you interested in comics?
A: My Dad has always been interested in comics, so I grew up in a house full of classics like Carl Barks’ Donald Duck as well as underground, European, and experimental comix. He also taught film, and watching the movies he’d project on our living room wall made me realise you could use visual narrative to do anything.

Q: What is your average day like?
A: I recently started teaching at the Victoria University of Wellington School of Design, so my days have become very busy. I’m often either in class or planning a class, or looking at students’ work. Otherwise, I’m probably at my studio writing or drawing. To relax, I watch old movies, read (often history), or play table-top role-playing games with friends.

dav

Q: Can you tell us about a current or recent project you’ve worked on?
A: I’m working on a long non-fiction comic exploring the history and culture of Dungeons & Dragons. It’s about world-building – the urge to create an imaginary reality so detailed it begins to feel almost real – and how the emergence of fantasy role-playing games 45 years ago introduced a new way to inhabit these fictional worlds. There are other, shorter, comics I’ve drawn recently, but that’s the big one that’s occupying my time.

Q: Do you have any traditions or rituals that help you when you get to work?
A: One trick I learned a while back was to leave something unfinished at the end of each day. That way, when I sit down to start drawing or writing, I don’t have to stare at a blank page; I can just pick up where I left off – and before I know it I’m back in the groove.

Q: Who/what is your biggest influence or inspiration?
A: There are so many! Hergé’s Tintin is a huge influence on my work. But one New Zealand cartoonist who’s had a big impact on me for most of my life is Barry Linton, who died last year. He drew comics for more than 40 years, and left behind an extraordinary body of work. I hope someone gets it all back into print soon.

 Q: What or who are your favourite NZ comics or creators?
A: Again, there are too many to mention even a fraction! Strips was a New Zealand comics magazine published between 1977 & 1987. Barry Linton (who I mentioned above) was one of its founding artists, but there were so many great cartoonists in there: Colin Wilson (the main driving force for the first few years), Joe Wylie, Kevin Jenkinson, Laurence Clark. There are earlier comics I’m fascinated by, too, including the work of Eric Resetar, Harry Bennett, and Jack Raeburn (all of who were publishing locally in the 1940s and 1950s). These days New Zealand has a large and diverse comics scene, with many cartoonists whose work I find inspiring. And every week I find someone new who’s putting out beautiful zines or webcomics. Each new discovery is like a treasure: an Instagram post or a page in a student’s sketchbook.

dav

Q: What is your dream comic project?
A: I have a comic I daydream about now and then. Sometimes when I’m lying in bed half-asleep, or when I’m walking to work in the morning, I’ll think about it. So far, all there is to show is a few words in my notebook. It may never happen. But I love that stage in a project, when everything’s still open, possible, uncontained. When it really is still a dream….

Q: What are you excited to share with ComicFest attendees? Just a taster!
A: That depends how much I get done between now and then.

Q: If you were to enter our cosplay contest, who/what would you dress up as?
A: I reckon Toby Morris and I could do a mean Captain Haddock and Tintin (now, if we can just find the right dog to play Snowy…).

You can find Dylan online in the following places:
Twitter: @dylanhorrocks
Website: hicksvillecomics.com
Instagram: @dylan.horrocks

ComicFest 2019 – 5 minutes with Jem Yoshioka

ComicFest is back for 2019! On Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2 to 4 of May at the National Library there will be panels, talks and workshops all day long for comic-lovers of all ages. You can also pick up a free comic from us on May the 4th and celebrate Free Comic Book Day, courtesy of GRAPHIC! For full programme click here and follow our updates on our Facebook event.

Next on the list is Jem Yoshioka, an illustrator and comic artist living in Wellington, New Zealand. Deftly weaving words and pictures together, Jem’s comics tell evocative and emotional stories with themes of belonging, place, and heritage. Jem’s current webcomic project is a soft science fiction romance between an android and a human called Circuits and Veins.
Jem Yoshioka appears at ComicFest with the support of the New Zealand Cartoon Archive.

Q: What first got you interested in comics?
A: I have always loved to tell stories and draw pictures, so in a way I feel like I was always on the path to comics. I read a lot as a kid and loved picture books fiercely.

Q: What is your average day like?
A: I work a full time job in communications, so I spend my day getting to help tell people’s stories and make sure things are understood by as many people as possible. I walk to and from work along the Wellington waterfront. I spend my evenings drawing, with breaks for dinner, chores, or whatever. It’s a balance that has worked well for me, but I am careful to be mindful of my limits and not push myself too hard if I know I need a break. Lately I’ve been playing a lot of Tetris and Star dew Valley to recharge when I need to!

Q: Can you tell us about a current or recent project you’ve worked on?
A: My webcomic Circuits and Veins is my current biggest project. I’ve been updating it since July, 2017 (coming up on two years, goodness!), and it’s honestly such a rewarding project. Long form serialised webcomics are notoriously difficult to keep going, and some weeks are a lot harder than others.

Q: Do you have any traditions or rituals that help you when you get to work?
A: I’m constantly listening to podcasts or watching YouTube. Podcasts have helped me so much to keep focused and motivated when I need to meet a deadline. Having my ears occupied helps keep my mind from straying away. I’m a big fan of Actual Play podcasts (listening to other people play table top roleplaying games), because it’s like a form of collaborative storytelling. My favourites are Friends at the Table and The Adventure Zone. If you have recommendations, let me know! I’m always looking for new ones.

Q: Who/what is your biggest influence or inspiration?
A: That’s a tough one. Can I say my grandma, Taeko? She’s led an amazing life, growing up in Hiroshima, Japan, witnessing the horrors of war as a young girl and teenager, meeting my granddad in Japan, and moving to New Zealand in the 50s, before you could even really find rice here, let alone the right kind of rice. Whenever I get stuck I think back on who she is, that she still has such a lightness and humour about her through everything. It makes me feel strong again. This has been something that has been coming through in my art since 2015, when I started writing autobiography comics exploring my connection to Japan and my Japanese heritage, which of course is all through her.

 

Q: What or who are your favourite NZ comics or creators?
A: I love Lore Olympus by Rachel Smythe, published on Webtoon. Rachel’s my best friend and we’ve known each other for half our lives, so I’m a bit biased. Rachel is a master illustrator and her work is so expressive, emotive, and even now her sense of storytelling, drama and comedic timing all work together to make me gasp. What else could you want from a comic?

Q: What is your dream comic project?
A: To be honest, I’m doing it! Making Circuits and Veins is honestly a dream, and I’m so happy that so many people love reading it. It does have an end though, and I’m also equally excited about my next story, which will be a fantasy story based on Japanese folk stories. I tried to launch it last year as Starstruck, but I wasn’t completely happy with the execution, and splitting my time between two ongoing comic projects wasn’t the smartest, so I’ve pulled it back to the drawing board. I chip away on concepts for it in between updating Circuits and Veins

Q: What are you excited to share with ComicFest attendees? Just a taster!
A: I’m keen to talk about what it takes to update a regular serialised webcomic, and also about how to balance comics and non-comics life.

Q: If you were to enter our cosplay contest, who/what would you dress up as?
A: Marceline, from Adventure Time. She’s got the best style.

You can find Jem online in the following places:
Instagram: @jemyoshioka
Twitter: @jemyoshioka
Blog/Website: jemshed.com