Win with Excio!

Have you discovered Excio yet? You can enjoy a rotating collection of fantastic book cover images for your device wallpaper, discover new authors, check out OverDrive eBooks and audiobooks, and share your favourites on social media. Plus, if you download Excio and use it for the next four weeks, the more you share the higher your chance of winning one of our great prizes!

Each week, the top 10 users who share the most book images will receive a voucher for a Clark’s cafe muffin and coffee combo at Central Library. On the 10th of November we will select 3 supreme winners and reward their efforts with Unity Book vouchers:

  • First place – $100
  • Second place – $50
  • Third place – $30

To get started, head to Google Play to download the Excio app for your device.
The app is currently only available for Android devices, an iOS app is still in development.

For more information check out our earlier blog post or the Excio FAQs – if you need further help, email us at enquiries@wcl.govt.nz.

Terms & conditions apply:

  • This competition is open to all Wellington City residents
  • You may enter as many times as you like.
  • Entries will be accepted from 11th October 2017 until 10th November 2017.
  • Only entries received on or between these dates will be considered.
  • Winners will be selected and notified by 17th November 2017.
  • Wellington City Libraries will make reasonable attempts to contact the winner. Another winner will be drawn if contact cannot be made.
  • The winning prizes cannot be exchanged for cash or similar, or another prize.
  • Your contact information will be kept confidential by Wellington City Libraries and not disclosed or sold to any other party.

Excio

Welcome to Excio!

Wellington City Libraries has partnered with local start-up Excio to bring amazing images to your Android smartphone or tablet home screen.

With the Excio app you can follow collections of images which can be used as wallpapers on the home screen of your device. The images link to our OverDrive eBooks/audiobooks and other library content, and you can even read OverDrive samples within the Excio app, as well as like and share book covers.

We have 20 genre/subject based collections on Excio which will be refreshed every couple of months. Enjoy a rotating collection of fantastic book cover images for your device wallpaper, discover new authors,  check out OverDrive eBooks and audiobooks, and share your favourites on social media.

By following our collections you can bring the library to you!

To get started, head to Google Play to download the Excio app.
The app is currently only available for Android devices, although the Excio team plans to develop an iOS app.

For more information check out the Excio FAQs – or if you need further help, email us at  enquiries@wcl.govt.nz.

Excio

September/October school holidays – Celebrate Space!

We have some great events happening across our libraries during the school holidays that are free to attend, and will be lots of fun too!

We will be celebrating World Space Week by creating Space Movies!

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Calling all Space, Film and Technology buffs! Bring a device, or use one of our tablets to showcase Earth from space by creating a stop-motion animated film.

Here’s when the events are on at a library near you:

Week 1:

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Wednesday 28 Sept, 11am
Miramar Library: Wednesday 28 Sept, 2pm
Khandallah Library: Thursday 29 Sept, 2pm
Johnsonville Library: Friday 30 Sept, 11am

Week 2:

Karori Library: Tuesday 4 Oct, 2pm
Wellington Central Library: Wednesday 5 Oct, 11am
Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library: Thursday 6 Oct, 2pm
Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Friday 7 Oct, 2pm

Some important notes:

  1. Please bring your own device if possible. The library will have a limited number of tablets that can be used on the day.
  2. If you bring your own device, it needs to be an Android or iOS tablet or smart phone with a camera
  3. Before the event, please download a free app called Stop Motion Studio on to your device.
  4. The event is free, and no bookings are required. However due to limited resources and library spaces, librarians may limit numbers on the day depending on how many people turn up.
  5. Suitable for ages 7+

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ComicsPlus iOS app

Have you tried our new eLibrary service ComicsPlus yet? It has a vast collection of diverse comics and graphic novels for all ages which can be read on a computer, and there is an iOS app!
Read comics and graphic novels on your iOS device by downloading the iOS app (Alternatively, you can find help for desktop or laptop access here).

There’s no limit to the number of titles you can take out through ComicsPlus, and comics are made available for 7 days. Now’s your chance to read any number of series from beginning to end!

ComicsPlus bookshelf

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Enjoy the magical worlds of Roald Dahl these holidays!

The waiting is over! Here’s what’s happening in the July School Holidays at a library near you…

Due to the release of the movie The BFG and with 2016 being his 100th birthday, we are celebrating that amazing author – Roald Dahl.

He is many people’s favourite author and his books have become classics for a number of generations. Lots have been turned into movies too – The BFG, Fantastic Mr Fox, The Witches, Matilda…

During the school holidays kids can whizz-pop their way into a library for some whoopsy-splunkers fun! We will be exploring the life of Roald Dahl, learning Gobblefunk (the language of The BFG), competing in a clever matching game, and creating dream jars. Your kids will be frothbuggling if they miss this one.

Here’s the details:

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Thursday 14th July, 11am

Miramar Library: Friday 15th July, 2pm

Karori Library: Tuesday 19th July, 11am

Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library: Tuesday 19th July, 2pm

Central Library: Wednesday 20th July, 11am

Johnsonville Library: Thursday 21st July, 11am

Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Friday 22nd July, 11am

Our School Holiday activities are suitable for 6-12 year olds and last one hour. They are free and bookings are not required – just turn up.

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Friday Movie Nights at Newtown

Family Watching TV TogetherOn the first Friday of each month we are screening family friendly feature films from the library’s collection at Newtown Library.

Sessions begin at 6pm in the YA area/tent at the library. These screenings are free to attend. The next session is tonight, on Friday 1 July.

We have special permission to screen these films for free in public libraries as long as we don’t advertise the film name online. Please call Newtown Library (389-2830) during library opening hours to get more details about the film screenings and reserve your seat.

World Refugee Day

Every year countries around the world recognise the plight of refugees and celebrate the contributions of diverse cultures by marking World Refugee Day on June 20. There are currently around 20 million refugees worldwide, half of which are under the age of 18, for more on the statistics check out The UN Refugee Agency. If you would like to know about the history of refugees in New Zealand, visit Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand.

If you would like to help refugees in New Zealand, consider assisting NZ Red Cross with refugee resettlement, or supporting ESOL courses with English Language Partners.

What is happening in Wellington?

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Here is a selection of books and DVDs to learn more about refugee experiences:

Syndetics book coverRefuge New Zealand: a nation’s response to refugees and asylum seekers
“Unlike people who choose to migrate in search of new opportunities, refugees are compelled to leave their homeland. Typically, they are escaping war and persecution because of their ethnicity, their religion or their political beliefs. Since 1840, New Zealand has given refuge to thousands of people from Europe, South America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Refuge New Zealand examines New Zealand’s response to refugees and asylum seekers in an historical context.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe quiet war on asylum
“Why would a country that has never had a boatload of asylum arrivals in modern history suddenly legislate for mass detention? Treading across the refugee camps of Burma and Thailand, to Australia’s detention centres and back to New Zealand, Tracey Barnett looks hard at this controversial new policy. She speaks to asylum seekers, refugees, NGO workers and migrants – people on the move and on the ground. Their lives and stories reveal a reality more complex than the political rhetoric, and one that questions how fair and ethical New Zealand really is on the world stage today.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCity of thorns: nine lives in the world’s largest refugee camp
“To the charity workers, Dadaab refugee camp is a humanitarian crisis; to the Kenyan government, it is a ‘nursery for terrorists’; to the western media, it is a dangerous no-go area; but to its half a million residents, it is their last resort. Situated hundreds of miles from any other settlement, deep within the inhospitable desert of northern Kenya where only thorn bushes grow, Dadaab is a city like no other. Its buildings are made from mud, sticks or plastic, its entire economy is grey, and its citizens survive on rations and luck. Among them are Guled, a former child soldier who lives for football; Nisho, who scrapes an existence by pushing a wheelbarrow and dreaming of riches; Tawane, the indomitable youth leader; and schoolgirl Kheyro, whose future hangs upon her education.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWriting for Raksmey: A Story of Cambodia (Investigating Power Series)
Writing for Raksmey tells of the lives of six families who fled the aftermath of the Cambodian killing fields, were held in a crowded refugee camp at the border of their country, and then sent back to a nation still at war. The past is not spoken about but the struggles are not over and the sons and daughters of those who once were refugees sense mystery in their legacy and know it is important to them. Joan Healy lived and worked with these refugees for many years. The saga of this quarter century is witness to both a determination to survive and human goodness that was never quenched.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe New Odyssey: The Story of Europe’s Refugee Crisis
“Europe is facing a wave of migration unmatched since the end of World War II – and no one has reported on this crisis in more depth or breadth than the Guardian ‘s migration correspondent, Patrick Kingsley. Throughout 2015, Kingsley travelled to 17 countries along the migrant trail, meeting hundreds of refugees making epic odysseys across deserts, seas and mountains to reach the holy grail of Europe. This is Kingsley’s unparalleled account of who these voyagers are. It’s about why they keep coming, and how they do it. It’s about the smugglers who help them on their way, and the coastguards who rescue them at the other end. The volunteers that feed them, the hoteliers that house them, and the border guards trying to keep them out.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe lightless sky: an Afghan refugee boy’s journey of escape to a new life in Britain
“The boy who fled Afghanistan and endured an terrifying journey at the hands of human traffickers across Europe is now a young man intent on changing the world. His story is a deeply harrowing and incredibly inspiring tale of our times.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverFrom victims to suspects: Muslim women since 9/11
“The so-called War on Terror, in its many incarnations, has always been a war with gender at its heart. Once regarded as helpless victims waiting to be rescued, Muslim women are now widely regarded by both Muslim and non-Muslim disciplinarians as a potential threat to be kept under control. How did this shift in attitudes come about? Shakira Hussein explores the lives of women negotiating the hazards of the post-9/11 terrain, from volatile Afghan refugee camps and Pakistani weddings to Australian suburbia and campaigns to ‘ban the burqa’. Her unique perspective on feminism, multiculturalism, race and religion is one that we urgently need.” (Syndetics summary)

We are hereWe are here [electronic resource]
“Told through the bright and unflinching eyes of Cat Thao, a girl born in a refugee camp, We Are Here is a memoir that begins in 1975 with her family’s gripping exodus by foot out of post-war Vietnam – a dangerous journey, unimaginable to most, on which most perished. The escape of Cat Thao’s family from persecution traverses the horrific jungles of Khmer Rouge Cambodia and into the crowded refugee camps of Thailand. From which, finally, the Nguyens were allowed to board a Qantas plane to a freedom they wanted desperately. But the stark, contrasting suburban landscapes of Western Sydney, Australia were not the unalloyed blessing they’d imagined.” (Adapted from Borrowbox description)

Mary meets MohammadMary meets Mohammad [Documentary]
Mary meets Mohammad is a film that follows the arrival of Tasmania’s first asylum seeker detention centre through the eyes of local knitting club member Mary. Mary is a staunchily Christian pensioner, who is not welcoming of the 400 male asylum seekers, who have come mostly from Afghanistan. Mary unexpectedly finds herself in regular contact with Mohammad, a 26 year old Muslim Afghan Hazara man, after her knitting club donates woolen hats to the men inside the detention centre. Mary sheds many of her prior beliefs as her relationship with Mohammad deepens and she is reminded of their common humanity” (Container).

The Good LieThe good lie [Movie]
“They were known simply as ‘The Lost Boys’. Orphaned by the brutal civil war in Sudan that began in 1983, these young victims traveled as many as a thousand miles on foot in search of safety. Fifteen years later, a humanitarian effort would bring 3,600 lost boys and girls to America” (Container).

How Shakespeare’s Globe got built – Diana Devlin’s personal account

Come to another Shakespeare lunchtime talk on Thursday 2 June 12.30-1.30pm at Central Library. Diana will present a personal account of the struggle, going back to 1972, when she was first involved in Sam Wanamaker’s concept to reconstruct Shakespeare’s Globe in London. Included will be film footage taken during the project.

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About the speaker:
Diana is Deputy Chair, Shakespeare Globe Council, a member of Globe Education Advisory Group and a freelance tutor in theatre arts, including Guildhall School of Music & Drama, Mountview Theatre School and Globe Education. Since 1995 she has lead ‘Rarely Played’ and other seminars at Globe Education.

From 1985-87, Diana was Administrator of the International Shakespeare Globe Centre, London working closely with the late Sam Wanamaker in the Globe reconstruction’s formative days and was later appointed a Trustee.

Diana Devlin read English at Cambridge University and gained her doctorate in Theatre Arts on a Fulbright Scholarship at the University of Minnesota. She has taught in numerous colleges and universities in the UK and USA including The Colorado College, Goldsmiths’ College, Central School, RADA, and Webber-Douglas.

As Head of Drama Studies, Guildhall School of Music & Drama from 1993-2011, Diana’s responsibilities included leading validation and revalidation of BA and MA programmes in Acting Department. She has been on other validation panels for BA in the UK, Hong Kong and USA. Between 1989-93 she was Personnel and Training Manager Trinity College of Music (Stage Presentation for Singers) and at Central School of Speech and Drama (course leading to BA Central School of Speech and Drama (course leading to BA in Drama). From 1980, Diana was appointed Advisory Drama Teacher, Inner London Education Authority. She has written several books and many articles and reviews.

Among her other fascinating roles, Diana was Training Consultant to Royal Collection Enterprises, including delivery of visitor care training at Buckingham Palace (Summer Opening, Queen’s Picture Gallery, Royal Mews), Sandringham House and Personnel and Training Manager, Leeds Castle, Maidstone, Kent.

SGCNZ is grateful to Shakespeare’s Globe, London for assisting in bringing Diana to New Zealand and Wellington City Libraries for hosting this talk.

For more information about Shakespeare events check out our blog – www.wcl.govt.nz/shakespearelives

Come to the Central Library and experience Shakespeare live!

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Just because April has finished and Shakespeare’s birth/death date on 23 April has passed does not mean that the fun is over at Wellington City Libraries.

We have more Pop-up Shakespeare sessions planned for the year, Shakespeare Globe Centre New Zealand will be organising for actors from various local theatre groups to come in to Central Library at 11am-12pm on one Saturday per month throughout the year. They will be performing scenes from selected plays, with four plays per event, in roughly chronological order.

Audience members will be encouraged to join in!

The scheduled dates and plays for Pop-up Shakespeare;

May 21: Henry VI, Richard III, The Taming of the shrew, The Two Gentlemen of Verona
June 25: Love’s Labour’s Lost, Richard II, Romeo & Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
July 23: The Merchant of Venice, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Henry IV, parts 1 & 2
August 20: Much Ado About Nothing, Henry V, Julius Caesar, As You Like It
September 17: Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus & Cressida, All’s Well That Ends Well
October 15: Measure For Measure, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth
November 12: Antony & Cleopatra, Coriolanus, Timon of Athens, Pericles, The Two Noble Kinsmen
December 10: Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest, Henry VIII, Cardenio

There are also a few talks coming up throught the year on various aspects of Shakespeare and theatre, more dates to follow.

To find out when other Shakespeare events at Wellington City Libraries are coming up, go to Shakespeare lives at the library

What do you think of our website? Give us your feedback

We are looking at updating the Wellington City Libraries website and we want your ideas. What is working, what isn’t, what changes or improvements would you like to see?

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Your suggestions could be in regards to the layout, style, navigation, usability, or what content we have on the home page.

You can provide feedback on the noticeboards at Central, Newtown and Johnsonville libraries, or by answering this simple question: what would you like to see improved or changed on the Wellington City Libraries website? Submit feedback here.

Wellington City Libraries