Toitū te whenua

There’s a diversity of kaupapa in this handful of books – organic gardening, pacifism of Parihaka, an outline of Māori participation in privatised military industry, stories from Tuhoe kaumatua and kuia, and a collection of research essays and thoughts on the home.

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“”Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on”–Back cover.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Whiti o Rongomai and the resistance of Parihaka / Danny Keenan.
“This is an account of the life and times of Te Whiti o Rongomai set against the politics and Crown policies of the nineteenth century. It traces the forces that shaped his life’s journey from Ngāmotu, where he was born, to his settling at Parihaka and his evolving sense of the injustices and disempowerment Māori experienced and his response to these. The book discusses the struggles Te Whiti had, as understood by some of his living relatives, against native policy of the time, and it gives insights into the motivations of Te Whiti and his actions. It explores the community at Parihaka, its resistance and the consequences of this and looks at Māori and government actions and responses up to the present day”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverA hidden economy : Māori in the privatised military industry / Maria Bargh.
“The Maori economy is often defined simply by the contributions of Maori in New Zealand in the areas of farming, fisheries and forestry. This book explores the ways that Maori in the privatised military industry contribute in monetary and non-monetary ways to the Maori economy. Workers in the privatised military industry very rarely, if ever, give interviews about their work or details about their pay. However, this book includes five interviews with Maori who have worked or are still working in the privatised military industry and explores how they articulate themselves as Maori in the industry, giving a glimpse at this secret world and how Maori operate in it.” (Syndetics summary)

Te ahi kaaroa : Rūātoki kaumātua narratives / Te Manatū Mātauranga o Tūhoe.
“”The Tuhoe Education Authority Te Manatu Matauranga o Tuhoe interviewed kuia and kaumatua in te reo Maori about their lives and experiences”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Ngā kaikōrero: George Thrupp, Rangipuke Tari, Tiwi Black, Patu Hale, Maureen Biddle, Kataraina Te Moana.

Syndetics book coverHome : here to stay / edited by Mere Kēpa, Marilyn McPherson and Linitā Manuʻatu.
“This is a collection of twelve academic essays that consider understandings of home and the impact of dominant societies on indigenous societies and their homes. The book covers home and language preservation, homelessness, retention of land, tobacco use in the home, loss of home through trauma and natural disaster, ageing and health, and the meaning of home. This is the third book in the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Edited Collections series.”–Publisher information.

Crimson / Marino Blank.

Syndetics book coverA Māori reference grammar / Ray Harlow.
“Based on a third-year university course Ray Harlow taught for a number of years, this grammar reference book is intended for people whose knowledge of Māori is at that level or higher – advanced learners, native speakers and teachers of Māori. The book provides explanations and examples of all the important sentence types of modern Māori. It guides readers progressively from the simple to the more complicated, starting with words and particles, proceeding through simple clauses and sentences to transformations of these and to complex sentences with elaborate internal structure”–Publisher information.

Postcards, urupa, travelling taonga

Two interesting books on the history of the New Zealand postcard have interesting examples of early Māori themed portraits and scenes. Then there is the inside story on Tariana Turia, and a biased spin on the activities of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata

Syndetics book coverCrossing the floor : the story of Tariana Turia / Helen Leahy.
“This biography of Tariana Turia sees family members, iwi leaders, social justice advocates and politicians share their experiences of this remarkable woman. While parliament was not originally part of her life plan, Tariana Turia was involved in many community initiatives. A turning point came in 1995, when Tariana’s leadership was evident in the reoccupation of Pakaitore. Here was a woman with the courage to care, the determination to speak up and a deep commitment to whānau. Inevitably, she was invited to stand in the 1996 general election. In her eighteen years as an MP, she advanced thinking in the disability area, advocated for tobacco reform and spoke out about sexual abuse, violence and racism. She also led the Whānau Ora initiative. In 2004, she crossed the floor, leading to the birth of the Māori Party”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverKo Ngā Takahanga i a Ārihi i Te Ao Mīharo / Lewis Carroll ; nā John Tenniel i whakaahua; nā Tom Roa i whakamāori.He ingoa karangaranga a Lewis Carroll: Ko Charles Lutwidge Dodgson te ingoa tuturu. He kaikauwhau i te Pangarau i Christ Church, Oxford. — Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford.

Syndetics book coverUnearthly landscapes : New Zealand’s early cemeteries, churchyards and urupā / Stephen Deed.
“… Immigrants brought with them a range of burial traditions, and of course Maori, already long established, had their own rituals. Over time, the various customs borrowed from one another to form a uniquely New Zealand way. In this beautifully written and illustrated book, Stephen Deed sets out to reconnect the historic cemeteries we see today with the history of this country and its people.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTell you what : great New Zealand nonfiction 2015 / edited by Jolisa Gracewood & Susanna Andrew.
“A fantastic collection of recent nonfiction essays, Tell You What contains live, wild, true stories from contemporary New Zealand. On the web and the wireless, in magazines and journals, at prizegivings and powhiri, New Zealanders are writing about the world. Essays and articles, speeches and submissions, tweets and travelogues–this book collects some of New Zealand’s best nonfiction from the past year into one anthology. Featuring New Zealand writers such as Steve Braunias, Lara Strongman, Eleanor Catton, and Tina Makereti, it explores a range of subjects, from mountain climbing and family secrets to cannibal snails and dangerous swims.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSend me a postcard : New Zealand postcards and the story they tell / William Main.
“The first New Zealand picture postcards were published in 1897, and quickly established themselves as an enduring and popular part of our visual culture. In the early part of the 20th century sending postcards snowballed into a craze which had few precedents (it is estimated that 7.5 million postcards were sent through the mail in 1909) … This charming and nostalgic collection of postcards is popular history at its best, and will have wide appeal. The cards are graphically fascinating, while the story they tell provides an intriguing view of life in New Zealand in the last century.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPost marks : the way we were : early New Zealand postcards, 1897-1922 / Leo Haks, Colleen Dallimore & Alan Jackson.
The way we were between 1897-1922 is revealed in more than 500 postcards that highlight New Zealand’s pioneer beginnings and the development of a unique cultural identity.

Tracking travelling taonga : a narrative review of how Māori items got to London from 1798, to Salem in 1802, 1807 and 1812, and elsewhere up to 1840 / by Rhys Richards. Machine-generated contents note: A French Visit to North Cape on 11 March 1793 — Lieutenant-Governor King from Norfolk Island to Muriwhenua in 1793 — The Fancy Trading for spars at Waihou (Thames) in 1795 — Mathew Flinders’ Tiki in 1795 — Sealers, Early Whalers and Spar Traders — American Traders to China — How Daniel Ward’s Donations Reached Salem in 1802 — The Donations of John Fitzpatrick Jeffrie in 1803 — The Donations of Captain William Richardson in 1807 — The Donations of Captain William Putnam Richardson in 1812 — Pacific Sealskins, Sandalwood and Beche de Mer — Other Early Taonga in American Collections — The Russians at Queen Charlotte Sound in 1820 — The Early Missionaries: Kendall and Marsden — The British Navy’s Search for Spars 1820-21 — Muskets for Preserved Heads from 1810 to 1840 — The French Collectors from 1824 to 1840 — Taonga in Other European Museums — Sperm Whalers from 1820 to 1840 — Six British Collectors of Taonga, 1820 to 1840 — The Three Maori Cloaks Donated by Mr C. Pettet — The Flax Trade from 1828 to 1833 — The Global Travels of the Mokomokai Daniel Aborn donated in 1831 — Taonga from the South Island — Remaining British Collections 1820 to 1840 — The United States Exploring Expedition in 1840 — Lost Provenances — Retrospect: The Collecting of Taonga before 1840.

Of Paekakariki : poetry, prose, pictures / collected by Sylvia Bagnall ; foreword by Sir John Trimmer.
“”Poetry, stories and artwork by people with a connection to Paekakariki”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Two great New Zealanders : the wisdom of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata / John Robinson.

Missionaries, education, arts, media, politics : as usual a broad range of subjects touching on Te Ao Māori.

Syndetics book coverMāori art : history, architecture, landscape and theory / Rangihiroa Panoho ; with photographs by Mark Adams & Haruhiko Sameshima.
“Up until now books on Maori art have described the work as either traditional (carving, weaving, painting) or contemporary, work produced post-1950s. This book presents a unique focus on Maori art by exploring the connection between the traditional and contemporary, and the place of Maori art within an international context. Maori Art provides a framework for looking at Maori art in a new way and fills a gap in Maori art history – while there are myriad surveys of Maori art there is currently very little critical writing on Maori art and artists”….(Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby : not here by chance / Jeff Evans.
“This biography of Heke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby brings together the varied life experiences that have made Hec Busby the master waka builder, waka expert, celestial navigator and highly regarded Te Rarawa elder that he is today. He is one of the few active waka taua builders and is responsible for the completion of more than a dozen of these waka for iwi around the country… His entrepreneurial and leadership skills along with his tribal and tikanga knowledge have led to his involvement in iwi activities as well as in organising Waitangi commemorations, kapa haka, ocean-going voyages, and waka wananga to pass on his knowledge to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe good doctor : breaking the rules, making a difference / Lance O’Sullivan with Margie Thomson.
“Lance O’Sullivan is a man on a mission. Raised in Auckland by a solo mother, he had a modest upbringing typical of the time, if one chequered with difficulties. After being expelled from two schools, Lance could have gone off the rails. Instead, he found his way at Hato Petera College, connecting with his Māori ancestry, and going on to study medicine… For his work, Lance has been acknowledged as a Sir Peter Blake Emerging Leader, Public Health Champion, Māori of the Year and, most recently, Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year. Passionate, brave and free-thinking, Lance stood up when no one else would…”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTauira : Māori methods of learning and teaching / Joan Metge.Based on extensive interviews, this book offers a window on a mid-twentieth-century rural Māori world as described by those who grew up there. Metge’s work tackles important questions about Māori teaching and learning of this period. What was the role of whānau and hapū, household and marae, kaumātua and siblings, work and play? How much learning was practical and how much by teaching?”–Publisher information. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: Chapter 1: Voices from the Past — Chapter 2: Learning as Part of Living — Chapter 3: Teaching and Learning — Chapter 4: Spirituality and Values — Chapter 5: Learning in Maturity as Part of Living — Chapter 6: Storehouses of Knowledge — Chapter 7: Wānanga — Chapter 8: Storytelling — Chapter 9: Learning in the School System — Chapter 10: Educational Practices and Principles.

Syndetics book coverAt the margin of Empire : John Webster and Hokianga, 1841-1900 / Jennifer Ashton.
“Born in Scotland in 1818, John Webster came in New Zealand via Australia in 1841 after narrowly escaping death in the outback following a violent encounter with a group of Aboriginal men. He spent most of the rest of his life in the Hokianga region, carving out a fortune as the region’s leading timber trader and cultivating connections with the leading political figures of the day… Webster was also engaged with Pākehā and the Crown – friends with Frederick Maning, visited by George Grey, Richard Seddon and others… Ashton argues that through his daily interactions, Webster helped slowly shift the balance of power in the North: the credit that he extended to his customers and kin saw them selling land to pay debts, helping push Māori into economic dependence”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverEntanglements of empire : missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body / Tony Ballantyne.
“The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. ENTANGLEMENTS OF EMPIRE is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period… Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality and missionaries found it was difficult to maintain their own practices because of their dependence on Maori chiefly patrons as well as the material constraints and social conflicts. ….” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPanguru and the city : kāinga tahi, kāinga rua : an urban migration history / Melissa Matutina Williams.
“Travelling from Hokianga to Auckland in the middle decades of the twentieth century, the people of Panguru established themselves in the workplaces, suburbs, churches and schools of the city. Melissa Matutina Williams writes from the heart of these communities. The daughter of a Panguru family growing up in Auckland, she writes a perceptive account of urban migration through the stories of the Panguru migrants. Through these vibrant oral narratives, the history of Maori migration is relocated to the tribal and whanau context in which it occurred. For the people of Panguru, migration was seldom viewed as a one-way journey of new beginnings; it was experienced as a lifelong process of developing a ‘co-existent home place’ for themselves and future generations. Dreams of a brighter future drew on the cultural foundations of a tribal homeland and past. PANGURU AND THE CITY: HE KAINGA RUA traces their negotiations with people and places, from Auckland’s inner-city boarding houses, places of worship and dance halls to workplaces and Maori Affairs’ homes in the suburbs. It is a history that will resonate with Maori from all tribal areas who shared in the quiet task of working against state policies of assimilation, the economic challenges of the 1970s and neoliberal policies of the 1980s in order to develop dynamic Maori community sites and networks which often remained invisible in the cities of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

The brown book : Māori in screen production / written by Dr. Ella Henry and Melissa Wikaire. Contents include: Origins of the Brown Book ; Māori and the screen industry ; working with Māori in screen production ;
Appendices: Māori society ; an overview ; Ngā Aho Whakaari executive members ; Māori production companies ‘ Māori iwi radio stations ‘ pan-tribal organisations ; screen industry organisations ; television broadcasters.

Māori carving : the art of recording Māori history / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“This photograph-rich book shows and describes the process of carving, covering the types of materials and tools used, the carving strokes and surface patterns and different regional styles. It shows the range of items carved from meeting houses to musical instruments, waka or canoes, storehouses, weapons and ceremonial items, such as boxes and staffs, and gives detailed information on the carving of wharenui or meeting houses – the epitome of the carver’s art. Information is given on how to read and understand a carving, looking in depth at parts of carvings and what to look for in elements such as the head, arms and hands of figures and the surface patterns used. The patterns and body styles are described and accompanied by detailed photographs that make identification of the elements easy. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maōri culture. The others are: Geothermal Treasures: Māori Living with Heat and Steam; Māori Weaving: The Art of Creating Māori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Māori Culture”–Publisher information.

Māori weaving : the art of creating Māori textiles / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Since their ancestors arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand and discovered the useful properties of harakeke (New Zealand flax), Maori have used flax leaves to create baskets, mats, housing materials, clothing and cords, ropes and fishing nets. In weaving and the patterns used, Maori record their histories and stories, passing on their culture, genealogy, values and beliefs, weaving together people and communities”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Marae : the heart of Māori culture / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“”Step-by-step guide to a powhiri, or welcome ceremony, showing and describing what happens, the people involved, what they do, and the values and understandings underpinning the ceremony. There is also a close look at the outside and inside of a wharenui, or meeting house, showing each of the elements and features that make it up. Maori cultural concepts are explained and discussed and a glossary of Maori terms is provided”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Geothermal treasures : Māori living with heat and steam / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Natural geothermal phenomena – geysers, hot springs and mud pools – have drawn people to the thermal region of New Zealand for years. Locals and tourists are captivated by the beauty and magic of bubbling mud, steam and hot water gushing from the earth. New Zealand’s world-class geothermal resource is a source of energy, a tourist attraction and a treasure of great historical, cultural, spiritual and economic importance for Maori. In this book, Maori traditional stories, understandings and history stand alongside geothermal science in an exploration of the thermal phenomena of the Volcanic Plateau. Beautiful photographs show the hot pools, rising steam, geysers, bubbling mud and thermal formations that visitors see, and the text provides information about the natural history of the area, its formation and its significance to Maori. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maori culture. The others are: Maori Carving: The Art of Preserving Maori History; Maori Weaving: The Art of Creating Maori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Maori Culture”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Lives of colonial objectives edited by Annabel Cooper, Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla. Otago University Press, 2015.
p. 20. Intimate immensity : a pūtorino in the Peabody Essex Museum by Lucy Mackintosh.
p. 27. Te Haupapa by Pāoria Tapsell
p. 35. Voyaging taonga : the Kīngi tauihi by Kelvin Day.
p. 110. Retrieved from oblivion? Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitaake and the photographic object by Ruth Harvey.
p. 117. ‘A sparrow alone upon the house top’ : the Te Pihoihoi Press by Lachy Paterson.
p. 122. He rau mahara : te wananga ledger by Migoto Eria.
p. 129. Minute books : an integral part of the Māori Land Court by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 134. A road into Te Urewera by Annabel Cooper.
p. 170. Te Tokotoko by Megan Pōtiki.
p. 206. Katherine Mansfield’s hei tiki by Jane Stafford.
p. 212. Te pai o ngā āhua : the visitors’ books at the Lindauer Art Gallery by Roger Blackley.
p. 219. Toko toru tapu : a tale of four churches by Damian Skinner,
p. 231. Māori monument or Pākehā propaganda? the memorial to Keepa Te Rangihiwinui, Whanganui by Ewan Morris.
p. 253. ‘Pōua’s cloak’ : the Haberield family kahu kiwi by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 311. Aferword : ther wharenui Mataatua, and some thoughts about things by Conal McCarthy and Jonathan Mane-Wheoki.

New Zealand government and politics edited by Janine Hayward. 6th ed. OUP, 2015.
p. 4. Māori political history 1860-1960 by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 84. Marxism by Evan Te Ahu Poata-Smith.
p. 240. The Māori Party by Morgan Godfery.
p. 300. The Māori seats by Maria Bargh.
p. 511. Youth engagement by Veronica M. H. Tawhai.

Coutts, Brent and Nicholas Fitness. Protest in New Zealand. Pearson, 2013.
p. 83. Maori resistance to military service.
p. 171. Maori feminist issues

Overland ; issue 219 (Winter,2015)
Features: Anton Blank. Change is the only constant (on gay role models) ; Catriona MacLennan. The ethics of defence (layers and rape trials) ; Fiction: Tina Makereti. Monster ; Poetry: Editorial by Robert Sullivan ; Airini Beautrais. Flow ; Nicole Hawkins. Māori dux ; Reihana Robinson. Terra nullius ; Kiri Piahana-Wong. Hiding ; Apirana Taylor. thank you ; pukana .

Matariki / Puanga 2015 – what’s on?

It’s time to celebrate the Māori New Year! Here is a great online booklet from Te Taura Whiri i te reo Māori all about Matariki, with great ideas to help us celebrate our indigenous New Year.

Matariki WellingtonWellington City Council also has information about Matariki on their website in both English and Te Reo Māori.

You can also keep track of all the regional events happening across Wellington — 60 free activities and a huge array of talent and showpieces pulled together in one place — on the Matariki Wellington website. I love their front page – it so embodies the spirit of whanaungatanga, aroha, and hūmarietanga!

Matariki Wellington

Also happening over on Twitter for Matariki, from Monday 15 June – Friday 29 July, will be our #MatarikiMash short story competition.

Matariki Mash

On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks from 15 June, we wish to test your imagination and your skill with language! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag!

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Also, new to our adult collection just in time for Matariki, is this story of Puanga – the constellation of Orion’s belt – which becomes the equivalent of Matariki for those iwi (on the Western, Northern areas of the North Island) who are unable to view Matariki because of it’s low position on the sky’s horizon:

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura

You can find more resources about Matariki and Puanga over on our Matariki page.

Beautiful books

The illustrated history, Tangata Whenua stands as a colossus amongst this month’s selection of books, but there are other remarkable books such as the story of Richard Nunns and Māori music, and the very readable snippets of life from Witi Ihimaera. Local poet, Apirana Taylor publishes his latest collection of poetry and Hōne Sadler’s Ngāpuhi narrative (in te reo Māori) will be treasured by his people and all speakers of te reo. The Walters whānau have recorded the stories of wharenui of the motu in another beautifully illustrated book.

Syndetics book coverThe Healthy Country? : A History of Life & Death in New Zealand
“In this book, Alistair Woodward and Tony Blakely tell the extraordinary story of life and death in Aotearoa New Zealand from first Maori settlement to the 21st century. Did Maori or Europeans live longer in 1769? How did Pakeha New Zealanders become the healthiest, most long lived people on the face of the globe (and why did Maori not enjoy the same life expectancy)? What caused New Zealanders’ health and longevity to be surpassed by other nations in the late twentieth century?… ‘The Healthy Country?’ is important reading for anyone interested in the story of New Zealanders and a decisive intervention in debates about health, disease and medicine.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 1. Before Cook : the long history of human longevity
Chap. 2. Māori majority : the first hundred years after Cook
Chap. 4. Decline and recovery ; Māori from 1860-1940

Polynesian legends and other poems / by A. Stanley Sherratt ; edited by Mark Pirie ; introduction by Dr Michael O’Leary.

Syndetics book coverTe ara puoro : a journey into the world of Māori music / Richard Nunns with Allan Thomas.
“Te Ara Puoro tells the story of Richard Nunn’s remarkable journey; of how fragments of knowledge given by elders were pieced together through countless presentations and performances on marae the length and breadth of the country; of how the instruments were re-created and developed; and of how he subsequently mastered their playing. The book gathers together an enormous amount of the current knowledge about taonga puoro, and will undoubtedly be the most important written resource in existence on the subject. It also charts the many other paths that Richard has taken with the music, including the huge variety of recordings he has done, his sound-track work, and his playing in other genres, such as free jazz and classical”–Publisher website.

The Mangatū remedies report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Supreme Court directed Waitangi Tribunal hearing. In 1961, the Crown had purchased 8,522 acres of land in the Mangatū 1 block north of Gisborne for the establishment of a forest to prevent hill country erosion and downstream flooding. The Tribunal had earlier found that the Crown had breached the Treaty of Waitangi when it acquired this land, and in the current inquiry, four claimant groups – the Mangatū Incorporation, Te Aitanga a Māhaki and Affiliates, Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, and Te Whānau a Kai – sought binding recommendations relating to the Mangatū Crown forest licensed lands. The Tribunal strongly urged the applicants to reunite and return to negotiations with the Crown.”–Publisher information.

Koowhiti / editorial panel: Tanemahuta Gray, Merenia Gray, Jennifer Stevenson, Peter Cleave, Paul Moon and Linda Ashley.

Syndetics book coverMāori boy : a memoir of childhood / Witi Ihimaera.“This honest, stirring work tells of the family and community into which Ihimaera was born, of his early life in rural New Zealand, of family secrets, of facing anguish and challenges, and of laughter and love. As Ihimaera recounts the myths that formed his early imagination, he also reveals the experiences from real life that wriggle into his fiction. Alive with an inventive, stimulating narrative and vividly portrayed relatives, this memoir is engrossing, entertaining and moving, but, more than this, it is also a vital record of what it means to grow up Māori”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMarae : te tatau pounamu : a journey around New Zealand’s meeting houses / Muru, Robin & Sam Walters. “A documentation of and tribute to New Zealand’s wharenui, big and small … Includes detailed shots of their carvings, kōwhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event”–Publisher information.
“For three years Muru, Robin and Sam Walters visited this country’s marae to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house… this handsome book captures the huge variety of New Zealand’s original architecture”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPuna wai kōrero : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan.
“Two leading Māori scholars collect Māori poetic voices in English and let flow a wellspring of poetry. From both revered established writers as well as exciting new voices, the poems in Puna Wai Korero offer a broad picture of Maori poetry in English. The voices are many and diverse: confident, angry, traditional, respectful, experimental, despairing and full of hope, expressing a range of poetic techniques and the full scope of what it is to be Māori”–Publisher’s website.

Syndetics book coverTangata whenua : an illustrated history / Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris.
“Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Māori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers an overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverThe breathing tree : new poems / Apirana Taylor.
“This collection offers forty new poems from popular poet Apirana Taylor. Inspired by nature and mythology, he shifts his focus from the mundane to the mysterious”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPrendergast : legal villain? / Grant Morris.
“James Prendergast is the most infamous figure in New Zealand’s legal history, known mainly for his condemnation of the Treaty of Waitangi as “a simple nullity” in 1877. But during his lifetime Prendergast was a highly respected lawyer and judge. He was arguably New Zealand’s dominant legal professional from 1865 to 1899, and his good reputation remained intact until the 1980s, when the Treaty of Waitangi finally returned to the centre of New Zealand political life. The more the Treaty has been celebrated, the more Prendergast has been condemned. “–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPēwhairangi : Bay of Islands missions and Māori 1814 to 1845 / Angela Middleton.
“… It is the story of New Zealand’s first permanaent European settlement at Hoki and the church mission that it represented, and of the other mission communities subsequently established in the Bay of Islands, at Kerikeri, Paihia, Waimate and Te Puna. It is a story of Ngāpuhi and Pākehā engagement, as neighbours, over four decades.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverKo tautoro, te pito o tōku ao : a Ngāpuhi narrative / Hōne Sadler.
“Sadler illustrates the unbroken chain of Ngāpuhi sovereignty by looking in-depth at his own hapū of Ngāti Moerewa, Ngāti Rangi and Ngāi Tawake ki te Waokū of Tautoro and Matarāua. The narrative is told through weaving together karakia and whakapapa, histories and kōrero that have been part of the oral traditions of Ngāpuhi’s whānau, hapū and iwi and handed down through the generations on marae and other gathering places”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTurning the hearts of the children : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church / edited by Selwyn Kātene.
“History of Church of Latter-day Saints involvement with Māori in NZ, with chapters based on 12 early prominent Māori figures”–Publisher information. “…Mormons did not reject traditional Māori socio-cultural mores. They shared reverence for family and genealogy and were guided by visions and dreams”–back cover. Profiled: Hirini Whaanga, Raihi Ngāwaka, Whatahoro Jury, Ngāhuia Chase, Percy Going, Hōhepa Heperi, Te Rāwhiti Paerata, Stuart Meha, Wetekia Elkington, Sidney Christy, Pare Takana (Duncan), Tūrake Manuirirangi.

Aotearoa New Zealand social work ; vol. 24, no. 4 (Review ed., 2014)
p. 65. Spirituality and social work : introducing a spiritual dimension into social work education and practice by Carol Phillips.

Archaeology in New Zealand ; vol. 57, no. 4 (December 2014)
P. 199. New Zealand’s settlement date : the last word? (or at least the latest) by Garry Law.
An instant vote taken without warning, at the 2014 NZAA Conference requesting participants to nominate a single AD date “for the earliest settlement of New Zealand by ancestors of the Maori.” 51 votes were accepted.

New Zealand journal of educational studies ; vol. 49, no. 2 (2014)
p. 176. Researching identity with indigenous D/deaf youth by Anne Hynds, Susan Faircloth, Clint Green and Helen Jacob.
p. 205. Representing Māori youth voices in community education research by Joanna Kidman.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 48, no. 2 (October 2014)
p. 50. Solidarity across the ‘colour line’ : Māori representation in the Maoriland worker, 1910-1914 by Cybele Locke.
p. 119. A window for revisionism : presenting te Tiriti in the Primary school bulletins, 1957 by Rachael Bell.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 1 (2014)
p. 20. The problematic portraits of Pomare II by Keith Giles.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 3 (2014)
p. 5. William Swanson Read Bloomfield (1885-1968) ; was he the first architect with Māori ancestry? by Denys Oldham.
p. 17. Well off the beaten track ; the site of New Zealand’s first Roman Catholic mass by Robin Astridge.

Oral history in New Zealand ; vol. 26 (2014)
p. 31. Tuia te ao marama : oral histories with Māori mental health nurses by Maria baker, Tio Sewell & Hineroa Hakiaha.

Tautohe, Tiriti, Tikanga – Māori recent picks

Wars and weapons figure strongly in this month’s books, but a wonderful reprint of essays by Roger Neich enriched with superb illustrations holds pride of place for me. Also included, a collection of poetry by Hinemoana Baker, and an interesting play Te Keni by Michalanne Forster along with the story of printer William Woon.

Syndetics book coverWaha = Mouth / Hinemoana Baker.
Hinemoana Baker is the “author of two collections of poetry, … edits the online journal of Whitireia New Zealand’s Creative Writing Programme, and co-edited the anthropology Kaupapa : New Zealand poets, World Issues… In 2009 she was the Arts Queensland Poet in Residence ; in 2010 she was one of 38 writers in residence at the University of Iowa International Writing Programme ; and in 2014 she is writer in residence at Victoria University in Wellington”– Inside cover.

Syndetics book coverBeyond the imperial frontier : the contest for colonial New Zealand / Vincent O’Malley.
“Beyond the Imperial Frontier is an exploration of the different ways Maori and Pakeha ‘fronted’ one another – the zones of contact and encounter – across the nineteenth century. Beginning with a pre-1840 era marked by significant cooperation, Vincent O’Malley details the emergence of a more competitive and conflicted post-Treaty world. As a collected work, these essays also chart the development of a leading New Zealand historian.” (Syndetics summary)

William Woon 1803-1858 : Wesleyan printer in Tonga and New Zealand / Gary A. M. Clover.
“The Wesleyan mission press played a supplementary but useful part…Woon’s [printings] helped to introduce a whole generation of Tongan and Maori scholars to the world of reading and writing which alone would have been enough to transform their societies into at least semi-literate ones. Because they were printed solely in the two indigenous languages, Woon was among those who were instrumental in putting Christian ideas and values, into the hands and minds of avid readers in both islands…His printing was therefore one key factor in the successful Christian evangelism of both lands”–[C J Parr, in, A missionary library]–inside back cover.

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Questions continue to emerge: Was it just? Was it right? Was Kereopa Te Rau even behind the murder? And who was Volkner – was he a spy or an innocent? In a personal quest, author Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Downfall : three New Zealand history plays / Michelanne Forster.
“Downfall offers an opportunity to look at the history of New Zealand through a dramatic lens. Te Keni explores the fraught relationship between Maori and Pakeha in the early colonial period. Larnach reveals the dynamics of the prominent family who established Larnach Castle in Dunedin. My Heart is Bathed in Blood examines the tragic implications of a relationship between two young medical students. Each play is introduced with an essay that provides historical context and performance history. Downfall is ideal for students and teachers of drama and for those with an interest in New Zealand’s rich heritage”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Te Keni is a story of Thomas Kendall, Hongi Hika, and Samuel Marsden. Much of the work was written during Peter Wells’ Ursula Bethell writing residency at the Unversity of Canterbury, 1993 — pp. 209-210.

Syndetics book coverMāori tales of love, war & mana / David Simmons.
“Maori Tales of Love War and Mana has been written after more than 60 years of research and field work with the author talking with local elders as well as working from the Otago Museum and Auckland War Memorial Museum (of which he was for a time Assistant Director) where he collected local traditions from throughout New Zealand, in places as widespread as the Far North, Fiordland and the Chatham Islands. More than 50 tales are related and include local versions of popular traditions and tribal history. The stories follow great Maori battles and migrations through New Zealand. The book is organised into Maori regions, including remote areas such as Fiordland and Chathams. Some of the tales have not been previously published; others given a local slant to more familiar traditions. Includes extensive references and indices. Illustrated with wood engravings by the Late E. Mervyn Taylor, leading artist of mid-20th century. David Simmons is a distinguished scholar and author of several popular books about Maori history and culture.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori weapons in pre-European New Zealand / Jeff Evans.
An introduction to the weapons that made up the armoury of tribes in pre-European New Zealand. Drawing on historical sources and contemporary expertise the author explains the manufacture, maintenance and use of each of the principal weapons: two handed weapons (including pouwhenua and tewatewha), patu and mere, spears (including huata and tokotoko), and other weapons (including hoeroa and oka).

Tradition and change in Māori and Pacific art : essays / by Roger Neich : edited by Chanel Clarke, Fuli Pereira and Nigel Prickett.
“This is Roger’s final gift to te ao M`qori, the Māori world. His impeccable scholarship, his skilled analysis, and his quiet sensitivity produced works of enduring value and excellence. For academics, he set a daunting standard ; to Māori and Pacific researchers, he offered genuine opportunity. He was generous, and humble, and he left us far too soon. E te Rangatira, moe mai ra”–Ngahuia Te Awekotuku (back page).

The Battle of Ōrākau : Māori veterans’ accounts : commemorating the 150th anniversary 1864-2014 / compiled and introduced by Robert Joseph and Paul Meredith.
“The Battle of Ōrākau was fought near Kihikihi from 31 March to 2 April 1864 by a contingent of approximately 300 Māori (including women and children) from Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Te Kohera, Ngāti Apakura, Ngāi Tūhoe, Ngāti Manawa, Ngāti Whare, Patuheuheu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Rongowhakaata and Ngāti Maniapoto among other tribes”–Page 1.
Includes korero on Rewi Manga Maniapoto. Hitiri Te Paerata, Paitini Wi Tapeka, Te Huia Raureti, Winitana Tupotahi, Poupatate Te Huihi, Te Wairoa Piripi, Peita Kotuku, Te Putene Umanga / Te Rutene Te Uamairangi?, Harehare Atarea.

Syndetics book coverNew myths and old politics : the Waitangi Tribunal and the challenge of tradition / Tipene O’Regan.
“”Negotiating a claim before the Waitangi Tribunal can involve troubling challenges to an iwi’s legitimacy, sometimes from unexpected places. In this unique behind-the-scenes account of the negotiation of Ngai Tahu’s Waitangi Tribunal claim, Sir Tipene O’Regan describes what happened when claims of New Age mysticism attempted to undermine traditional whakapapa and academic scholarship”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Te tū hanga whare o Whetū = The rebuilding of Te Whetū o Te Rangi / Des Tatana Kahotea.
“”This is a photo-ethnography, a book that documents the rebuilding of a wharenui (meeting house). A project over a period from late 2006 that was planned, built and opened on December 20 2008 at Ngapeke, Tauranga. This is a Ngati Pukenga marae, an iwi of Mataatua waka origin. The original wharenui opened in 1915 was severely damaged by fire in September 2006. The people of the marae were determined to replace the wharenui with a new building complete with wharenui art. They undertook the creation of the wharenui art of kowhaiwhai, tukutuku and raranga whariki themselves and wood-carving was both commissioned and donated. This is a record of the activity that took place and the people who were involved. The book particularly shows some of the Maori customs associated with the re-building of a wharenui”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Reo, wairua and whenua

John Patterson produces another thought provoking book to add to his well-known writings on Māori values and there’s an interesting clutch of books on aspects of te reo, Puanga, and root vegetables for the garden.

Pacific parables : learning from Māori tradition / John Patterson ; with illustrations by Pat Hanly.
“In this book, John Patterson tries to encourage a more sensitive and sympathetic attitude among Pākehā people by showing how the traditional narratives of the Māori – what we still tend to call their myths and legends – can open our eyes to some of the deeper aspects of Māori philosophical and political thought.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMormon and Maori / Marjorie Newton.
“The New Zealand Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints … was really two missions: one conducted among Pakeha (European) New Zealanders, and another among the indigenous people of the islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand … Those assigned to Maori work learned to love a noble, proud, but disgruntled race, a people smarting from the confiscation of their land and their consequent loss of mana … disenchanted with orthodox Christian churches, and whose numbers were shrinking to the point where extinction or amalgamation seemed in the eyes of many Europeans, at the time of the Mormon approach, their only future prospect”–Preface, p. xi-xii.

Te Rongopai 1814 ‘Takoto te pai!’ : bicentenary reflections on Christian beginnings and developments in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Allan Davidson, Stuart Lange, Peter Lineham, Adrienne Puckey.
“ll of the essays .. were originally prepared for a conference held at Waitangi, 27-29 November 2012 … The conference aimed to stimulate critical reflection on missionary beginnings in New Zealand and the formative influences of Christianity in early inter-relationships of Māori and Pākehā”–Preface p. 7.

Syndetics book coverMaranga mai! : te reo and marae in crisis? / edited by Merata Kawharu.
“…te reo and tribal marae today seem to be in crisis… without a living language spoken regularly on the marae or in everyday lives, what does the future hold for Māori and for our nation?”–Back cover.
Writers include: Merimeri Penfold, Paul Tapsell, Hōne Sadler, Arapera Ngaha, Margie Hōhepa, Fraser Toi, Stephen McTaggart, Kiri Toki, Merata Kawharu, with Paratene Tane, Pounamu Jade Aikman-Dodd, Michael Hennessy

Syndetics book coverHow to find a taniwha : a deep connection between English and Māori words / Trevor Lloyd.
“Many languages have similar sounds and all have similar semantic elements that make up word meanings. But the existence of the same or equivalent sounds and elements of meaning in many words of two unrelated languages as described in this book, is very surprising and cannot be explained by current linguistic theory”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverThe value of the Māori language = Te hua o te reo Māori / edited by Rawinia Higgins, Poia Rewi and Vincent Olsen-Reeder.
“This collection of essays in Māori and English explores the actions taken to restore the status of the Māori language, challenges ideas about how the language can be revitalised and looks at approaches to ensure the future of the language. The chapters discuss issues around the Māori Language Act and Crown policy, community initiatives, language development in the education system, and support of Māori language in media”–Back cover.

The new electoral politics in New Zealand : the significance of the 2011 election / edited by Jack Vowles.
p. 141. Māori voters, public policy and privatisation by Ann Sullivan, Martin von Randow and Aimee Matiu.

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Puanga is the star Rigel in Orion. Most of the tribes of the Māori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Māori New Year. In Māori mythology he was believed to be the older brother of Matariki. His cosmic rising between May and June in the early morning sky signalled the beginning of winter which is why Māori knew him as the foremost winter star.”–Whakataki, p. 4.

Rauwaru, the proverbial garden : Ngā-weri, Māori root vegetables, their history and tips on their use / Nick Roskruge.
“Root vegetables termed nga-weri in Māori, are classified as ‘root’ crops but can actually be either roots, tubers, swollen stems or even fungi… Vegetables and food crops need to be able to survive through to harvest in this climate and root crops are especially valuable for their ability to store in-ground beyond the life of the plant itself.”–p. ii

Ruakere Hond, Acushla Dee O’Carroll

It’s a long, long trail winding mai i Te Upoko o te Ika ā Māui ki Parihaka, but on Saturday 17 May,  my heart’s right there.

A ‘post-graduate gathering’ began with a powhiri at 12:30, at Te Paepae o Te Raukura, as friends, fellow students and devoted whānau came together to celebrate the achievements of Mr Taranaki Reo, aka, Ruakere Hond, and Acushla Dee O’Carroll, Gen SMS, who received their PhDs at Massey, Palmerston North on Friday 16 May.

Parihaka Pa, South Taranaki Region
Parihaka Pa, South Taranaki Region. Collis, William Andrews, 1853-1920 :Negatives of Taranaki. Ref: 1/1-012046-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23187188

Research findings were presented at Te Niho o Te Ati Awa – and we were fittingly welcomed by Ngapera and her rōpū, with the twirling poi and chant of E rere rā, into this historic house.

A the short profile of the busy life of Dee is available on the Massey site:

“Dee, who grew up in Te Hawera, Taranaki (her iwi affiliations are Ngaruahine Rangi, Ngāti Ruanui and Te Āti Awa), is a member of the College of Health’s Whariki Research Centre at the School of Public Health. She is investigating how Māori and other indigenous cultures use social media.”

News of Dee’s Fulbright-Harkness award and plans for studying in Hawaii and USA, last year, was delivered on Te Karere:

Saturday’s citation of Dee O’Carroll’s research paper was “Kanohi ki te kanohi : a thing of the past? An examination of social networking sites and the implications for Māori culture and society.”

The thesis is available at here.

Through mainly qualitative exploration of [these] data, the domains of rangatahi (Māori) usage, whanaungatanga, tuakiritanga [identity] and tikanga were traversed, to interrogate the contemporary ideas and trajectory of kanohi ki te kanohi values. The study highlights the range of issues that Māoridom must grapple with to guide SNS usage in cultural contexts that considers kanohi ki te kanohi values and the future of marae.” – pānui for gathering of 17/5/2014

This fascinating research scratches the surface of SNS. There are implications for young Māori (initially) but then for all of us, as social networking sweeps across our traditional ways of interaction.

Relevant to the kōrero, is the realisation that Ngāti Porou have already streamed live the tangi of three beloved mātua: Dr Pat Ngata, and his father, and Parekura Horomia. What changes will this type of ‘interaction’ bring to protocols and the sustaining of our marae in the future?
Articles by Dee available at Wellington Central Library and through online access are:
O’Carroll, A. (2013). Maori identity construction in Social Networking Sites. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies., 6(2), 2-16.
O’Carroll, A.D. (2013). Virtual whanaungatanga – Māori utilising social networking sites to attain and maintain relationships. AlterNative 9(3), 230-245. A326
O’Carroll, A.D. (2013). An analysis of how Rangatahi Maori use social networking sites. Mai Journal, 2(1), 46-59. A327

RUAKERE HOND

Tenā koutou taku nui, taku rahi kei te kūreitanga o Taranaki nei puta atu ki ōna pāranga huhua noa.
“My whānau connections are Taranaki. I firmly believe the distinctive form of our local language, culture and history is a critical factor for Taranaki Māori communities to be fully engaged in education. I have been keenly involved with adult education in the community and institutions since the 1980’s, especially in reo Māori immersion teaching and community development. It is inspiring to see the progress of Māori studies in WITT, which continues to be innovative and forward thinking. This supports WITT in being a pivotal facilitator of significant social, cultural and economic achievement in Taranaki by working alongside community initiatives and playing a major part in responding to local aspirations for growth and development.
Heoti anō rā e ōku karangamaha, rarau mai ki tēnei puna mātauranga. Mā wai kē te puna nei e hurahura? Māu, māku, mā tātou!”

But for many years now, Ruakere Hond’s name has been synonymous with Taranaki revitalisation of Te Reo. The man stands as a colossus in his chosen field of endeavour, and at last he has found the missing link between public health, communities and society.
In his thesis, entitled Matua te Reo, Matua te Tangata : Speaker community : visions, approaches, outcomes, Ruakere shows how he was at a loss to understand why his apparently sound understanding and development of revitalisation processes were not having the success he had anticipated.

It was not until he began to define community as opposed to society and to understand the implications of sustainable health outcomes and the need to establish secure cultural identity that Ruakere began to move more positively towards achieving his goals of reo revitalisation.

I ngā rā o mua

This month there are historical accounts and threads such as The Bay of Plenty historical review which has delivered an attractively written and illustrated booklet commemorating the 150 year old Battle of Pukehinahina, Gate Pa. This slim volume covers weapons, records and maps, biographical essays, relics, naval and army snippets, Crabbe’s flag, etc.

Working as allies : supporters of indigenous justice reflect / Jen Margaret
“Non-indigenous supporters of indigenous justice in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand discuss their practice. Through in-depth interviews they candidly share the challenges of this work and their responses to these. They reflect on what led them to become involved in indigenous justice issues, what informs their approach and how they know if their work is useful.” (Back cover)
Includes the thoughts of Tim Howard, Alex Barnes, Melanie Nelson, Joan Macdonald, Jonathan La Nauze, Indira Narayan, Lorelle Savage, Pru Gell, Clare Land and Jen Margaret, Mitzi Nairn

Syndetics book coverTe Awa Atua = Menstruation in the pre-colonial Māori world : an examination of stories, ceremonies and practices regarding menstruation in the pre-colonial Māori world : based on a Masters thesis / Ngāhuia Murphy.
“By examining stories about menstruation located in Māori cosmologies, tribal histories, oral literatures, ceremonies and rites, Ngāhuia Murphy argues that menstruation was seen as a medium of whakapapa (genealogy) that connected Māori women to their pantheon of atua (deities). Ancient rites, recorded in tribal songs and chants, reveal that menstrual blood was used for psychic and spiritual protection. These examples unveil striking Indigenous constructs of womanhood that radically challenge notions of female inferiority and menstrual pollution.” (Back cover)
The book references Rose Pere, Awa atua, Maui, Kurawaka

Te kāhui maunga : the National Park District Inquiry Report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Waitangi Tribunal inquiry into alleged acts and omissions of the Crown in relation to the iwi and hapū of te kāhui maunga, the cluster of mountains in the central North Island that includes Tongariro, Ngāuruhoe, and Ruapehu. Of the 41 claims heard, many related to the establishment and management of the Tongariro National Park and the creation and operation of the Tongariro power development scheme. The report covers the parks, waterways, hydropower, geothermal resources, and land alienations.” (Publisher information)

Te Haa o te reo : the inspiration of the language.   Te Rōpū Pakihi Inc.   [2013].
“This resource has been developed to assist Māori business owners who seek to express kaupapa in their business”–Page 3.
: Karakia — Mihimihi — Whakatauki — Himene — Waiata — Kiwaha — Kupu o tuhi kōrero — Kupu mo te wharemahi.

Historical review : Bay of Plenty journal of history ; vol. 62, no. 1 (2014)
Relics of Gate Pa, Pukehinahina (special issue)
p. 27. Robley’s living taonga. These two pages include the words of Maui Dalvanius Prime describing the descendants of Horatio Gordon Robley and Harete Mauao of Matapihi. Their child was Hamiora Tu Ropere, and their grandchildren, Hepeta Hamiora Tu and Te Hepiwhara Hamiora Tu. Te Hepiwhara married Te Hauparoa Whareaitu, of Taranaki.

Kōrero nehe: te Moana nui a Kiwa, ngā mihinare, pakanga

Histories of the Pacific Ocean, missionaries and the fight for land but the taonga amongst this selection is a beautifully illustrated text (Te Reo Māori) by Keri Kaa, pictures by Martin D. Page.

Syndetics book coverKeeping languages alive : documentation, pedagogy and revitalization / edited by Mari C. Jones and Sarah Ogilvie.
“Many of the world’s languages have diminishing numbers of speakers and are in danger of falling silent. Around the globe, a large body of linguists are collaborating with members of indigenous communities to keep these languages alive. Mindful that their work will be used by future speech communities to learn, teach and revitalise their languages, scholars face new challenges in the way they gather materials and in the way they present their findings. This volume discusses current efforts to record, collect and archive endangered languages in traditional and new media that will support future language learners and speakers. ” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverPacific histories : ocean, land, people / edited by David Armitage and Alison Bashford.
“The first comprehensive account to place the Pacific Islands, the Pacific Rim and the Pacific Ocean into the perspective of world history. A distinguished international team of historians provides a multidimensional account of the Pacific, its inhabitants and the lands within and around it over 50,000 years, with special attention to the peoples of Oceania. It providing chronological coverage along with analyses of themes such as the environment, migration and the economy; religion, law and science; race, gender and politics.” (Cover)

Syndetics book coverTaka ki rō wai : he kōrero pūrākau mō tētāhi hoiho / ko Keri Kaa, te kaituhi ; ko Martin D. Page, te kaitā pikitia, kaitātai pukapuka.
“A true story about the birth of a foal, set in the small rural community of Rangitukia, on the East Cape of the East Coast, in the North Island of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Reflecting rural Māori life, the story is an observation of the cooperation between animals, and contemplates the magical and the miracle in nature.” (Publisher’s information)

Between the kindling and the blaze : reflections on the concept of mana / Ben Brown.
[This] “is a bold exploration of the concept of mana.  In resonant poetry and short prose poetry, the author does not seek to define mana but rather reflect on its myriad nuances.  “The colour of mana is red they say, from warm sunset tones to bold vigorous and bloody shades of power and authority, the kaka feather, the dog-skin cloak,  the ochre of the earth.  But where is the white of  purity, the certainty of black, the humility of grey?  Colour then, will not suffice in the exploration of mana.  How can a humble man be proud?  Why is the mountain more than a mountain?  How does a river flow in my veins and where is the strenght in silence?  This book is not silent.  It cannot be…” (Back cover)

Te paruhi a ngā tākuta / Nigel Beckford and Mike Fitzsimons, interviews, writing, publishing.
“Tells the story of 27 Māori doctors and students. Some just starting their careers, others reflecting on decades of service, sacrifice and experience. Collectively, these stories span the history of Te Ohu Rata O Aotearoa – Māori Medical Practitioners Association (Te ORA) from trailblazing early Māori GPs to the latest generation of Māori health professionals and learners… Many of the people in this book have challenged New Zealand’s health system and influenced the provision of health services to Māori whānau and communities for the better.” (Back cover)

A desperate dawn : the battle for Turuturu Mokai 1868 / Nigel Ogle and Ron Crosby ; illustrations and photography, Nigel Ogle.
“In July 1868 South Taranaki chief Titokowaru indicated his toughening attitude toward European settlement in his territory by attacking the small military redoubt at Turuturu Mokai. That battle led to a campaign where Maori and Pakeha fought some of the most desperate and violent battles of the New Zealand wars. This book puts the battle into a social, political, technological and historical contecxt.” (Back cover)