Anō, toitū te whenua: New Māori books

Our latest list of new Māori material includes an interesting fictionalised account of the Battle of Ōrākau, in both Te Reo and English by Witi Ihimaera. Pūkaki, a book about the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor has now been translated into te reo. A research publication on indigenous aspects of business and management include an overview of the environmental failures of the MV Rena written by Ella Henry.

Syndetics book coverSleeps standing : a story of the Battle of Orākau / Witi Ihimaera ; with Hēmi Kelly.
“Both fiction and fact, this fascinating book is a kaleidoscopic exploration of the Battle of Orakau …The battle marked the end of the Land Wars in the Waikato and resulted in vast tracts of land being confiscated for European settlement … It is estimated that, at the height of the battle, 1700 immensely superior troops, well-armed and amply resourced, laid siege to the hastily constructed pa at Orakau. The defenders were heavily outnumbered with few supplies or weapons but, when told to submit, they replied- ‘E hoa, ka whawhai tonu matou, ake, ake, ake!’ ‘Friend, I shall fight against you for ever, for ever!'” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverExtinguishing title : Maori land rights, people, and perspective in post-colonial New Zealand / Stella Coram.
“Without question, British ‘settlement’ of the new colony created a demand for Māori land and, to facilitate the sale of the land, the “Crown set about transferring customary land into individual title… My concern is that another injustice is being created since rights to title, required of Māori by the Crown in order to retain their land, are being summarily dismissed.” (Preface, pp. xiii-xiv)

Syndetics book coverTura and the fairies ; and, The overworlds and Tu : from Maori legendary lore / by Johannes Andersen.
“This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous aspirations and rights : the case for responsible business and management / edited by Amy Klemm Verbos, Ella Henry and Ana Maria Peredo.
Indigenous Aspirations and Rights takes an Indigenous perspective in examining the intersection of business with Indigenous peoples’ rights, in light of the UN Global Compact and the PRME. Indigenous rights include, but are not limited to, human, cultural, educational, employment, participatory development, economic, and social rights, rights to land and natural resources, and impacts on identity, institutions, and relations. This book illustrates three main aspects of business practices in relation to Indigenous peoples: learning from failure, unresolved issues and on-going challenges, and developing models for success.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPūkaki : te hokinga mai o te auahitūroa / Paul Tapsell ; whakamāoritanga nā Scotty te Manahau Morrison.
“First published in English in 2000, Paul Tapsell’s award-winning work brilliantly captured the life and transformations of Pūkaki the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor depicted on the New Zealand 20-cent coin. Now a superb translation by Scotty Morrison (also of Ngāti Whakaue descent) makes this illustrated work available entirely in Te Reo Māori.” (Syndetics summary)

Point of order, Mr Speaker? : modern Māori political leaders / edited by Selwyn and Rāhui Katene.
“Eight current or former Māori politicians from different political parties recount their leadership experiences and describe the significant events in their journeys from their early lives to Parliament. Paula Bennett, Te Ururoa Flavell, Hone Harawira, Tau Henare, Shane Jones, Nanaia Mahuta, Hekia Parata and Metiria Turei give readers a unique glimpse into their personal and public lives. They share their aspirations, lessons learned and knowledge gained while making meaningful contributions to Māori development.” (Syndetics summary)

He kōanga tangata tahi

Exploration, heritage and kōrero nehe – these are topics amongst the new books for He Kohikohinga Māori, Mahuru, 2017.

Syndetics book coverLaunching Marsden’s mission : the beginnings of the Church Missionary Society in New Zealand, viewed from New South Wales / eds. Peter G. Bolt & David B. Pettett.
“In 1794 the Rev Samuel Marsden became the second Chaplain to the Colony of New South Wales. Both Marsden and the first Chaplain, the Rev Richard Johnson, came to the Colony under the sponsorship of the Church of England Evangelicals. They had high hopes that New South Wales would be the base from which the ‘everlasting gospel’ would sound forth to achieve the salvation of the ‘poor benighted heathens’ of the South Seas. To this end Marsden began the mission to New Zealand on Christmas Day, 1814… This book is a celebration of that mission and Marsden’s preparations for it.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTears of Rangi : experiments across worlds / Anne Salmond.
“Six centuries ago Polynesian explorers, who inhabited a cosmos in which islands sailed across the sea and stars across the sky, arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand where they rapidly adapted to new plants, animals, landscapes and climatic conditions. In this, her most ambitious book to date, Dame Anne Salmond looks at New Zealand as a site of cosmo-diversity, a place where multiple worlds engage and collide. Like our ancestors, Anne Salmond suggests, we too may have a chance to experiment across worlds.” (Syndetics summary)

Tuai : a traveller in two worlds / Alison Jones & Kuni Kaa Jenkins.
“A thrilling biographical narrative of a young Bay of Islands leader who grew up in the Māori world of the early nineteenth century – and crossed the globe to encounter England in the midst of the industrial revolution. This is a story about the Māori discovery of England. These voyages between worlds represented risk and opportunity: Tuai chose opportunity, and the rest is history.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverTruth and beauty : verse biography in Canada, Australia and New Zealand / edited by Anna Jackson, Helen Rickerby, and Angelina Sbroma.
Truth and Beauty turns critical attention to an exciting genre that lies at the intersection of biography and poetry, narrative and lyric, history and the confessional. With essays on influential verse biographers Margaret Atwood, Dorothy Porter, Michael Ondaatje, Jennifer Maiden and Anne Carson along with newer practitioners including Chris Orsman, Jordie Albiston, Robert Sullivan, Tusiata Avia and Amy Brown, this collection looks at the inevitable tensions that arise between historical fact and the work of imagination – and the competing and complementary claims of truth and beauty.” (Syndetics summary)

Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki / edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker.

Syndetics book coverHistory, heritage, and colonialism : historical consciousness, Britishness, and cultural identity in New Zealand, 1870-1940 / Kynan Gentry.
History, heritage and colonialism offers an internationally relevant examination of the nexus between empire and colonial identity, by exploring the politics of history-making and interest in preserving the material remnants of the past in late nineteenth and early twentieth century colonial society… Offering important insights for societies negotiating the legacy of a colonial past in a global present, this book will be of particular value to all those concerned with museum, heritage, and tourism studies, and imperial history, at undergraduate and postgraduate level, as well as among scholars in these fields. It will also be of interest to a wider public interested in heritage and the history of museums.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHe reo wāhine : Māori women’s voices from the nineteenth century / Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla.
“During the nineteenth century, Maori women produced letters and memoirs, wrote off to newspapers and commissioners, appeared before commissions of enquiry, gave evidence in court cases, and went to the Native Land Court to assert their rights. He Reo Wahine is a bold new introduction to the experience of Maori women in colonial New Zealand through Maori women’s own words.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAnimism : respecting the living world / Graham Harvey.
“Animism’ is now an important term for describing ways in which some people understand and engage respectfully with the larger-than-human world. Its central theme is our relationship with our other-than-human neighbours, such as animals, plants, rocks, and kettles, rooted in the understanding that the term ‘person’ includes more than humans. Graham Harvey explores the animist cultures of Native Americans, Maori, Aboriginal Australians and eco-Pagans, introducing their diversity and considering the linguistic, performative, ecological and activist implications of these different animisms.” (Syndetics summary)

Ngā pepeha o te takere nui / Anaha Hiini.
“Here is a collection of pepehā for marae in the rohe of Te Arawa waka.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Scotty and Stacey Morrison.
“An introduction to the Maori language… covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household- whether you’re practising sport, getting ready for school, celebrating a birthday, preparing a shopping list or relaxing at the beach, Maori at home gives you the words and phrases – and confidence – you need.” (Syndetics summary)

New Zealand geographic; September-October 2017
p. 26. Star struck by Leonie Hayden. The story of aerospace engineer: Mana Vautier (Te Arawa and Ngāti Kahungunu)
p. 46. When worlds collide by Leonie Hayden. The story of Ihumātao, on the shores of Manukau Harbour : Auckland’s oldest settlement now designated special housing area.

Kia mau ki te tūmanako, te whakapono me te aroha

First on the list of Māori material this year, is a lovely collection of whakataukī – pearls of wisdom – grouped under six “virtues” mātauranga/wisdom ; māia/courage ; atawhai/compassion ; ngākau tapatahi/integrity ; whakahautanga/self-mastery ; and whakapono/belief. The whakataukī in the heading of this blog is listed under “tūmanako” – and translates as: Hold fast to hope, faith and love.

Syndetics book coverMauri ora : wisdom from the Māori world / Peter Alsop & Te Rau Kupenga.
“Pearls of wisdom contained in proverbs – whakatauk-I – have been gifted from generation to generation as an intrinsic part of the M-aori world. As powerful metaphors, they combine analogy and cultural history in the most economical of words. Short and insightful, they surprise, engendering reflection, learning and personal growth. Mauri Ora links whakatauk-I to key personal virtues idealised across cultures and generations. The virtues – wisdom, courage, compassion, integrity, self-mastery and belief – stem from the science of positive psychology; the study of how to live a better life.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGottfried Lindauer’s New Zealand : the Māori portraits / edited by Ngahiraka Mason and Zara Stanhope.
“From the 1870s to the early twentieth century, the Bohemian immigrant artist Gottfried Lindauer travelled to marae and rural towns around New Zealand and – commissioned by Maori and Pakeha – captured in paint the images of key Maori figures. For Maori then and now, the faces of tipuna are full of mana and life. Now this definitive work collects those portraits for New Zealanders. The book presents 67 major portraits and 8 genre paintings alongside detailed accounts of the subject and work, with essays by leading scholars that take us inside Lindauer and his world.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTakatāpui : a place of standing / [edited by] Jordon Harris.
“Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Māori (takatāpui) tell their stories and reflect on the journey from exclusion and prejudice to taking their rightful place in Aotearoa. Illustrated with stunning colour photographs, Takatāpui features introductions by Witi Ihimaera, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku and the late Henare Te Ua.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe toki me te whao : the story and use of Māori tools / Clive Fugill.
“It is over a century since the last major book on Māori carving tools. Clive Fugill, Master Carver at the NZ Māori Arts & Crafts Institute, tells the mythical, traditional and modern stories of the making and use of carving tools, including the adze (toki) and the chisel (whao) with detailed drawings and photos.” (Syndetics summary)

He iti kahurangi / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Particles are often a source of difficulty to Maori language learners, but using these correctly is essential in order to create a Maori spirit and flavour within the sentence, so that it sounds sweet to the Maori ear, and to follow nga tikanga o Te Reo Maori. Tohunga wetereo Heni Jacob explains the usage of the following pumuri and pumua: ahua, ake, anahe/anake, ano, ata, atu, haere, hanga, hangehange, harukiruki, hawerewere, he, hengahenga, hitarari, hitenga, hoake, hoatu, hoki, ia, iho, kaha, katoa, kau, ke, kehokeho, kenekene/keneuri, kere, kerekere, kino, kita, kitakita, koa, koia, kutikuti, mai, maioio, makehua, makuare/makuware, manunu, marie, matua, morukaruka/moruka, mea ake, na, nawenawe, nei, noa, nge, ngero/ngerongero, ngihangiha, ora, oreore, oti, pai, paku, panuku, patere, pea, penu, petapeta, piropiro, pohapoha, pu, puahoaho, puku, ra, ranei, rawa, rere, rikiriki, rirerire, riro, rukaruka, rukiruki, rukuruku, tahi, taiahoaho, tangetange, tangotango, tata, tere, tiahoaho, tika, tino, tokitoki, tonu, tuauriuri, uriuri, wawe, whaka-, whakaharahara, whakarere, whaioio.” (Syndetics summary)

Tikanga Māori : living by Māori values / Hirini Moko Mead.
“This is an authoritative and accessible introduction to tikanga Maori for people wanting to understand the correct Maori ways of doing things. It covers the ways that tikanga guides relationships between people, people’s relationship with the natural environment, spiritual areas, and health, and it proposes guidelines to test appropriate tikanga Maori responses to new situations and challenges in contemporary life.” (Syndetics summary)

Toitū̄ te whare / kaiētita Agnes McFarland rāua ko Taiarahia Black.
“A collection of articles exploring the role and significance of whare tipuna and marae as sources of traditional and ancestral knowledge, and of the richness of te reo Maori language and literature.
“Ko te kaupapa o te whare tipuna me te marae, he pupuri i nga korero tuku iho a te iwi mai ano i nga tipuna. He wahi hai wananga tahi i nga kaupapa. Ki te kore o tatau whare tipuna me o tatau marae ka ngaro atu tetahi wahi nui tonu o tatau, te iwi Maori. No reira, me kaha tonu tatau ki te whakapakari i a tatau ano, kia mohio pai ai tatau ki nga tikanga i runga i o tatau marae hai huarahi whakatairanga i to tatau reo rangatira. Ki te mau te reo ki roto i o tatau whare tipuna, ki te mau hoki ki te marae ka mau ki nga wahi katoa. Ko te tino putake o tenei pukapuka a Toitu te Whare he titiro atu ki nga papareanga o muri mai kia hangaia he pataka korero ma ratau, he whakatutu atu i nga heru herehere i nga ihoiho o tuawhakarere hai whakatipu whakaaro ma ratau.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWayfinding leadership : ground-breaking wisdom for developing leaders / Chellie Spiller, PhD, Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, John Panoho.
“This book presents a new way of leading by looking to traditional waka navigators or wayfinders for the skills and behaviours needed in modern leaders. It takes readers on a journey into wayfinding and leading, discussing principles of wayfinding philosophy, giving examples of how these have been applied in businesses and communities, and providing action points for readers to practise and reflect on the skills they are learning.” (Syndetics summary)

New treaty, new tradition : reconciling New Zealand and Māori law / Carwyn Jones.
“Provides a timely examination of how the resolution of land claims in New Zealand has affected Mori law and the challenges faced by indigenous peoples as they attempt to exercise self-determination in a post colonial world. Combinind analysis with Mori storytelling, Jones’s nuanced reflections on the claims process show how Western legal thought has shaped treaty negotiations.” (Syndetics summary)

Maiea te tupua : whānau accounts of Waikato-Maniapoto World War One veterans and one conscriptee : commemorating 100 years of World War One / produced by Pūrekireki Marae with the support from Te Pua Wānanga ̄ki te Ao of the University of Waikato, the Waikato Raupatu Lands Trust, the Maniapotō Māori Trust Board, Trust Waikato and Te Puni Kōkiri.
Accounts by family members of: Te Rauangaanga Mahuta, Kohatu Hari Hemara Wahanui, Tuheka Taonui Hetet, Te Rehe Amohanga, Rotohiko Michael Jones, Joseph Ormsby, William Takoro Kohi.

Syndetics book coverIndigenous homelessness : perspectives from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand / edited by Evelyn J. Peters, Julia Christensen.
“Being homeless in one’s homeland is a colonial legacy for many Indigenous people in settler societies. The construction of Commonwealth nation-states from colonial settler societies depended on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands. Essays … argue that effective policy and support programs aimed at relieving Indigenous homelessness must be rooted in Indigenous conceptions of home, land, and kinship, and cannot ignore the context of systemic inequality, institutionalization, landlessness, among other things, that stem from a history of colonialism…” (Syndetics summary)

Journal articles:

AlterNative ; vol. 12, issue 4 (2016)
p. 341 Te Mata Ira : faces of the gene : developing a cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research involving Māori by Maui Hudson […et al.]
p. 356 Ngā reanga o ngā Tapuhi : generations of Māori nurses by Leonie Walker, Jell Clendon, Leanne Manson & Kerri Nuku.
p. 369 A cause for nervousness : the proposed Māori land reforms in New Zealand by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 380 E Hine : talking about Māori teen pregnancy with government groups by Anna Adcock, Beverley Lawton & Fiona Cram
p. 396 Indigenous positioning in health research : the importance of kaupapa Māori theory-informed practice by Elana Curtis.

He waka eke noa

I te marama nei : he whakamātau hinengaro, he mana whakairo hinengaro, he mana motuhake, he wai māori, i te ao hurihuri : indigenous issues of psychology, intellectual property rights, water rights, in the evolving world.

Syndetics book coverThe Māori meeting house : introducing the whare whakairo / Damian Skinner.
“This all-new guide to the whare whakairo, or decorated Maori meeting house, covers every aspect of these treasures–their history and evolution, structure and art forms, and symbolism and cultural significance. With more than a hundred intriguing historical and contemporary photographs, and containing dozens of diagrams and a helpful glossary, the book clearly illustrates the parts, and the arts, of the whare whakairo with reference to numerous meeting houses from all over Aotearoa New Zealand and the world… The Maori Meeting House makes an important contribution to contemporary discussions about indigenous art history and taonga Maori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania… The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous notions of ownership and libraries, archives and museums / edited by Camille Callison, Loriene Roy and Gretchen Alice LeCheminant.
“Forms of indigenous knowledges and cultural expressions are found in libraries, archives or museums. Often the “legal” copyright is not held by the indigenous people’s groups, who believe that the true expression of their culture can only be sustained and remain dynamic in its proper cultural context. The aim is to respect these ways of knowing while appreciating the cultural memory institutions’ attempts to transmit them to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTupuna awa : people and politics of the Waikato River / Marama Muru-Lanning.
“‘We have always owned the water . . . we have never ceded our mana over the river to anyone’, King Tuheitia Paki asserted in 2012. Prime Minister John Key disagreed: ‘King Tuheitia’s claim that Maori have always owned New Zealand’s water is just plain wrong’. So who does own the water in New Zealand – if anyone – and why does it matter? By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power between Maori and the state.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te manu kai i te mātauranga : indigenous psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand / Waikaremoana Waitoki & Michelle Levy, editors.
Contents: Foreword: Ka awatea / Michelle Levy & Waikaremoana Waitoki — Introduction: My name is Ripeka / Waikaremoana Waitoki — Chapter 1: Kaupapa Māori psychologies / Michelle Levy — Chapter 2: A ripple of intimacy with creation : the stone bird of sorrow / Virginia Tamanui — Chapter 3: Whanaungatanga : asking who you are; not, what you are / Maynard Gilgen and Māmari Stephens — Chapter 4: Te toka tū moana : resilience, love and hope / Ainsleigh Cribb-Su’a & Hilda Te Pania-Hemopo — Chapter 5: Healing whānau violence : a love story / Erana Cooper & Sharon Rickard — Chapter 6: Re : “I just want to heal my family” / Lisa Cherrington — Chapter 7: Ngā rākau a te pākehā : Matiu’s story / Simon Bennett — Chapter 8: A new moon : talking story with Ripeka to support the healing of soul wounds / Melissa Taitimu — Chapter 9: Wairuatanga / Hukarere Valentine — Chapter 10: ‘Haerenga ki waiora’ : my experience of inpatient mental health services / Julie Wharewera-Mika — Chapter 11: Māori and neuropsychological assessment / Margaret Dudley — Chapter 12: He wāhine āwhina : a healing narrative of end of life care / Tess Moeke-Maxwell — Chapter 13: A partnered approach to psychological assessment : he ritenga whaimōhio / Sonja Macfarlane — Chapter 14: Kaihau waiū : attributes gained through mother’s milk : the importance of our very first relationship / Tania Cargo — Chapter 15: He kākano mai I rangiātea / Bridgette Masters-Awatere — Chapter 16: Ngā kete mātauranga : a curriculum for an indigenous psychology / Waikaremoana Waitoki.

Syndetics book coverThe Great War for New Zealand : Waikato 1800-2000 / Vincent O’Malley.
“A monumental new account of the defining conflict in New Zealand history. It was war in the Waikato in 1863-64 that shaped the nation in all kinds of ways: setting back Māori and Pākehā relations by several generations and allowing the government to begin to assert the kind of real control over the country that had eluded it since 1840. Spanning nearly two centuries from first contact through to settlement and apology, Vincent O’Malley focuses on the human impact of the war, its origins and aftermath. Based on many years of research and illustrated throughout, The Great War for New Zealand is a groundbreaking book written in the conviction that a nation needs to own its history.” (Publisher information)

E ngā uri whakatupu : weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa / authors, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Kahutoi Mere Te Kanawa, Rangituatahi Te Kanawa, Barbara Pareatai Moke.
“Describes the Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato exhibition, ‘E nga uri whakatupu, Weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa’, which ran from 29th June 2014 to 28th July 2015 and was the most significant collection of Maori korowai and weaving ever shown in Aotearoa New Zealand. Includes a waiata composed by Dame Rangimarie Hetet.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe land is our history : indigeneity, law, and the settler state / Miranda Johnson.
The Land Is Our History tells the story of indigenous legal activism at a critical political and cultural juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In the late 1960s, indigenous activists protested assimilation policies and the usurpation of their lands as a new mining boom took off, radically threatening their collective identities. Often excluded from legal recourse in the past, indigenous leaders took their claims to court with remarkable results… Miranda Johnson examines how indigenous peoples advocated for themselves in courts and commissions of inquiry between the early 1970s to the mid-1990s, chronicling an extraordinary and overlooked history in which virtually disenfranchised peoples forced powerful settler democracies to reckon with their demands. … Fracturing national myths and making new stories of origin necessary, indigenous peoples’ claims challenged settler societies to rethink their sense of belonging.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Making a “Partnerhsip between races” : Māori activism and the Treaty of Waitangi.
Chap. 6. The Pacific way. (Aspects of the Whanganui river claim)

Toiapiapi : He huinga o ngā kura pūoro a te Māori = a collection of Māori musical treasures / Hirini Melbourne ; with an introduction by Richard Nunns.
“This 25th anniversary edition contains notes on traditional Maori instruments and lyrics. In Maori and English. Accompanied with a CD and includes an introduction from Richard Nunns. Originally published in 1991”–Publisher information.

Decolonisation in Aotearoa : education, research and practice / edited by Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan.“This book examines decolonisation and Māori education in Aotearoa New Zealand in ways that seek to challenge, unsettle and provoke for change. Editors Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan have drawn together leading Māori writers and intellectuals on topics that are at the heart of a decolonising education agenda, from tribal education initiatives to media issues, food sovereignty, wellbeing, Christianity, tikanga and more.”–Back cover.
Writers: Ranginui Walker, Moana Jackson, Ani Mikaere, Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai, Jenny Lee-Morgan, Takawai Murphy, Veronica Tawhai, Leonie Pihama, Mera Lee-Penehira, Āneta Hinemihi Rāwiri, Naomi Simmonds, Kirsten Gabel, Jo Smith, Jessica Hutchings, Ngahuia Murphy, Debbie Broughton.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s rivers : an environmental history / Catherine Knight.
“‘New Zealand s Rivers: An environmental history’ explores the relationship between New Zealanders and their rivers, explaining how they have arrived at a crisis point, where fresh water has become their most contested resource and many rivers are too polluted to swim in. Environmental historian Catherine Knight reveals that the tension between exploitation and enjoyment of rivers is not new. Rivers were treasured by Maori as food baskets and revered as the dwelling places of supernatural creatures. But following European settlement, they became drains for mining, industrial waste and sewage, and were harnessed to generate power and to irrigate farmland. Over time, the utilitarian view of rivers has been increasingly questioned by those who value rivers for recreation as well as for ecological, spiritual and cultural reasons. Today, the sustainable use of rivers is the subject of intense debate. Thoroughly researched and richly illustrated, ‘New Zealand s Rivers’ is an accessible and compelling read for all New Zealanders, including anglers, kayakers, farmers, environmental practitioners, policy-makers, students and anyone with an interest in our environment and history.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 2. Māori and awa.
Chap. 11. Asserting mana over rivers.

Syndetics book coverCultural safety in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Dianne Wepa.
“In this second edition of Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand, editor Dianne Wepa presents a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives adopted by experienced educators who are active in cultural safety education. Thoroughly revised to incorporate the latest methods and research, this edition reflects updates in government policies and nursing practices, and features new chapters on ethical considerations when working cross-culturally, as well as the legislative requirements of the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Each chapter includes key terms and concepts, practice examples providing content from healthcare workers’ everyday experiences, reflective questions to encourage the assimilation of ideas into practice, and references to allow further exploration of the issues discussed. Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand will equip students, tutors, managers, policy analysts and others involved in the delivery of healthcare with the tools to acknowledge the importance of cultural difference in achieving health and well-being in diverse communities.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 5 Towards cultural safety by Irihapeti Ramsden.
p. 65 Culture and ethnicity : what is the question? by Dianne Wepa.
p. 79 Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi 1840 : its influence on health practice by Denise Wilson and Riripeti Haretuku.
p. 177 Midwifery practice by Katarina Jean Te Huia (including: traditional Māori birthing ; colonisation of Māori birth practices ; the situation today)
p. 235 Māori health : Māori- and whānau-centred practice by Denise Wilson and Huhana Hickey.
p. 252 Nursing and working with disability by Huhana Hickey (includes Māori/indigenous disability identity).

Journal of Pacific archaeology ; vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)
P. 26. Finding meaning and identitiy in New Zealand buildings archaeology : the example of “Parihaka” house, Dunedin by Peter Petchey & Sean Brosnahan.
p. 43. TheTawhiao cottage and the archaeology of race and ethnicity by Matthew Campbell.
p. 59. The source, composition and typology of ‘limestone’ adzes from eastern North Island, New Zealand by Phillip R. Moore & Campbell S. Nelson.
p. 59. Ecological consequences of pre-contact harvesting of Bay of Island fish and shellfish, and other marine taxa, based on midden evidence by John D. Booth.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 50, no. 2 (October, 2016)
p. 44. The New Zealand Government’s niupepa and their demise by Lachy Paterson.
p. 68. The politics of history and Waikato-Tainui’s raupatu treaty settlement by Martin Fisher.

Journal of New Zealand literature ; no. 34.1 (2016)
p. 143. Bones rolling under a river : poetry, history and politics in Bill Sewell’s The ballad of fifty-one and Robert Sullivan’s Cassino : city of martyrs/Citta Matire by Airini Beautrais.
p. 207. The Urewera notebook by Katherine Mansfield ; edited by Anna Plumridge / reviewed by Janet Wilson.

Dr George S Evans : a life

Recently I breathed in the gentle gentility of the Wellington Club, The Terrace, whilst held in awe of Helen Riddiford’s meticulous and deeply researched account of the New Zealand Company’s finest member, Dr George Samuel Evans.

geo1By evening’s end, there were surely more than the just the two of us who would attest to his right to be named Wellington’s founding father, – a man who stood tall on the principles and the application of the Company’s constitution and held a desire to include tangata whenua in te ao hurihuri, / an evolving new life. In the words of one of our two official languages – here was a man truly worthy of the description: he kōtuku rerenga tahi.

For all the sentiments expressed above – how many people , today, remember any details of this man who gave his name to that inner bay (Evans’s / Evans Bay) and whose contribution to the settlement placed him second only to Colonel Wakefield, in his roles, which included that of chief judicial authority for the new colony.

When Edward Gibbon Wakefield accompanied Lord Durham to Canada, it was Dr Evans who stepped forward to place his hand firmly on the tiller of the colonial ship.

But who was this man? George Evans grew up in a household where civil and religious liberty was embraced. He was a brilliant scholar who excelled in Latin, Greek and Hebrew – His later work spanned the fields of education, judiciary and journalism. In 1928 he became, briefly, headmaster of Mill Hill School, London.

geo2
(Source: School House at Mill Hill School : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mill_Hill_School)

It was here that he met school matron Mrs Riddiford, whose husband passed away in 1829. George and Harriet married, 16 January 1930, and George became the stepfather of Amelia (13 years) and Daniel (16 years) – he, Daniel, who was to become the founder of the Riddiford farming dynasty at Orongorongo and the stations around the Wairarapa coast of New Zealand.

There is so much detail of Evans’ life within the pages of this book. There’s the interesting story of his involvement with Nayti and Hiakai, two passengers on the Mississippi who became stranded at Le Havre, were rescued by the New Zealand Association and provided with lodgings by Wakefield and Evans, in the 1830s. With Hiakai’s help George Evans was introduced to Māori customs and reo. He began a grammar of Te Reo Māori, which was completed in 1839, but never officially published. Wellington City Central Library holds a copy of this Manuscript of a Maori grammar.

The top view stretches across Thorndon Flat with Dr Evans’ house on the left, a range of early houses and businesses along the waterfront and on the right, Colonel William Wakefield’s house with flagpole.

geo3

(Source: Brees, Samuel Charles, 1810-1865 :Pictorial Illustrations of New Zealand. London, John Williams and Co., Library of Arts, 141, Strand, 1847.. Ref: PUBL-0020-22. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22816178)

Dr Evans fulfilled a designated role as advocate for Māori in all legal disputes – with varying degrees of success. Helen’s easy- read documentation of Dr Evans life and work in the new colony makes this book an absolute must for those of us mindful of the view – that you must first understand and embrace the past in order to move forward.

The study of the settlement of Wellington is a very complex exercise – but – don’t be confined only to those official publications — the reports and commissions, and records of deeds of release – Here lies, within these pages, the flavour of that era. This is a far more interesting journey by way of Helen’s archival research and her detailed account of Dr Evans work.

Dr Evans returned to England, 1846-52, and was dealt to harshly by the Company, in clearing the debts on his town and country sections in Wellington. It was an example of Wakefield’s ‘ability’ to turn against his closest allies.

George Evans and Harriet moved to Melbourne, 1853. He planned to undertake legal work but also began working with the Melbourne Morning Herald. He later gained a seat in the legislative assembly. His journalistic output was legendary. George and Harriet returned to New Zealand, 1865, but Harriet died 31 March 1866, and Dr Evans’ death followed in 1868.

In the words of Helen Riddiford “In the colonies he was head and shoulders above many of his peers in education and ability. He operated within an influential network of men, but was always independent in his views, which isolated him from many of his contemporaries. He was viewed as a ‘singular character’ a gentleman almost unique in this setting. His many visionary ideas were handicapped by a volatile temperament and principles that were compromised by circumstances, an unpredictable man of reckless courage whose steadfast commitment to the creation and success of Wellington was fully acknowledged after his death. Amongst others, The Independent noted that he was ‘one of the founders, if not the real founder of this colony. There is scarcely an official document of the period in which [his] name is not conspicuous”.

Here was a man truly worthy of the title bestowed by his Māori friends – Nui, Nui Rangatira

Jock McEwen: He kōtuku rerenga tahi

Orongomai Marae, Upper Hutt was the chosen place for a very special evening on Monday 17 October – the launch of the book Te Oka – Pākehā kaumātua : the life of Jock McEwen written by Mary McEwen.

1
“He lived by the philosophy of ‘saying little and doing much’”

We speak sometimes of special people amongst us who have travelled successfully in two worlds. Quite often there follows the story of one such- of a minority culture who has seamlessly stood tall and proud not only in his/her own culture but also in the mainstream – i.e. – Pākehā or Palagi world.

Jock McEwen was living proof of that the reverse may well occur.

Whanaungatanga
On Monday many dear friends and relatives of Jock McEwen gathered to honour a man whose ancestral roots were in Scotland and Perthshire, but whose great-grandparents reached these shores in the very early days of the new colony at Te Whanganui-a-Tara.

One ancestor – not admired by Māori, was John Bryce who led the Pāhuatanga – the destruction of Parihaka, 5 November, 1881 and others of Jock’s family became fluent speakers of Te Reo.

Whanaketanga
But Jock began his school days at Taonui, where his father was headmaster at the local school – which lay very close to Aorangi Marae. It was there, through the guidance of Meihana Te Rama-Apakura, and Kahurautete, and their whānau that he began to absorb te reo , te māoritanga me he kōrero nehe, tō te iwi who would later inspire his writing of the book Rangitane.

2
At a very early age, inspired by carvings at the wharenui of Ngāti Kauwhata, he began his lifelong interest in whakairo, creating a patu which he deemed appropriate for himself as leader of the Feilding Boy Scouts’ haka. At secondary school, he excelled in languages – English, French and Latin, but the depression deprived him of the opportunity to leave school to take up, immediately, a university bursary and so he began his university studies whilst still at Palmerston North Boys’ High School.

Tū Rangatira
Please take the time to track down this biography, to acquaint yourself with the details of the life of this unique man, – hei whānaunga, hei kāiarahi, hei kaimahi kawanatanga – including Niue, his niche at Māori Affairs, his work with inmates at Wi Tako prison, his development of a carving school.

3
Important to him were his roles as a founding member of Ngāti Poneke Young Māori Club, – his involvement with Kingi Tahiwi in composing and supporting waiata in Wellington and later, his huge mahi within the community at Upper Hutt and in the creation of an urban marae – Orongomai , where, along with Dovey Katene-Horvath, he assisted Māwai Hakona Māori Club to became a force to be reckoned with, in the development of regional and national cultural competitions.

6
Māwai Hakona : Upper Hutt City Library : Recollect : 1989 05 30 2 (Creative Commons)

This book invites us to understand the immense contribution that Jock McEwen made to the lives of all New Zealanders.

Most people – however much revered – are, in death, more or less ‘replaceable’ in the continuum of life on earth – Jock, himself, came close to proving that there are some who are not.
Six years after his death we are blessed with this story written by his daughter-in-law, Mary McEwen.

Kua wheturangitia a Te Oka, i te korowai o Ranginui.

New books in our Maori collection

In this selection we have another beautiful art book – Artefacts of Encounter – which begins with stories of artefacts collected during Cook’s three voyages, followed by examples of colonial collecting and museum histories.

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania. … The collection includes some 100 artefacts dating from Cook’s first voyage. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Syndetics summary)

Image from Huia PublishingThe struggle for Māori fishing rights : te ika a Māori / Brian Bargh.
“Maori fishing rights were ignored by the Crown from the time the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840. Although guaranteed by the Treaty, Maori struggled to re-establish these rights until the 1980s after years of argument in the courts. Four pou, or pillars of support, significantly assisted in the recognition and eventual recovery of Maori fishing rights: the Treaty of Waitangi; the courts; the Waitangi Tribunal and the resilience and tenacity of Maori people, who never gave up fighting for what was right.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWomen of the Catlins : life in the deep south / edited by Diana Noonan ; photography by Cris Antona.
“A haunting, off-the-beaten-track destination, the little-known Catlins region of New Zealand is as mysterious today as it ever was. In this first in-depth look at the lives of its inhabitants, award-winning writer Diana Noonan and photographer Cris Antona collaborate to capture the thoughts and feelings of 26 women from this remote outpost. As the subjects speak for themselves on topics as diverse as family, work, isolation and their relationship with the environment, there is, at last, an opportunity for readers to enter into the heart of this rugged, unknown landscape where few venture and only the strongest make it home.” (Syndetics summary) Includes lives of: Rona Williamson (Ngāi Tahu) ; Heni Landreth (Ngāti Porou) ; Liz Cairns (Ngāpuhi), ; Nikeisha Clarke (Ngāi Tahu)

Te herenga reo : indigenous storytellers, Matariki, 2015 / compiled and curated by Te Herenga Reo Press for Te Herenga Reo Trust.
Contributors: Tama Waipara, Rob Ruha, Marama Davidson, Cilla Ruha, Michelle Ngamoki, Dayle Takitimu.

Syndetics book coverKa ngaro te reo : Maori language under siege in the nineteenth century / Paul Moon
“Ka ngaro te reo, ka ngaro taua, pera i te ngaro o te moa. If the language be lost, man will be lost, as dead as the moa. In 1800, te reo Maori was the only language spoken in New Zealand. By 1899, it was on the verge of disappearing altogether. In Ka Ngaro Te Reo, Paul Moon traces the spiralling decline of the language during an era of prolonged colonisation that saw political, economic, cultural and linguistic power shifting steadily into the hands of the European core…” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPerforming indigenous culture on stage and screen : a harmony of frenzy / Marianne Schultz.
“Examining corporeal expressions of indigenousness from an historical perspective, this book highlights the development of cultural hybridity in New Zealand via the popular performing arts, contributing new understandings of racial, ethnic, and gender identities through performance. The author offers an insightful and welcome examination of New Zealand performing arts via case studies of drama, music, and dance, performed both domestically and internationally.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe first migration : Māori origins 3000BC – AD1450 / Atholl Anderson.
“Thousands of years ago migrants from South China began the journey that took their descendants through the Pacific to the southernmost islands of Polynesia. Atholl Anderson’s … synthesis of research and tradition charts this epic journey of New Zealand’s first human inhabitants. Taken from … Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History this Text weaves together evidence from numerous sources: oral traditions, archaeology, genetics, linguistics, ethnography, historical observations, palaeoecology, climate change and more.” (Syndetics summary)

Whanake Taiao = Environmental Sustainability: Matariki events at Central Library

Matariki 1 JuneOn the four Wednesdays in June, Wellington City Libraries is presenting a series of four events around Whanake Taiao = Environmental Sustainability, at the Central Library, 12.30 pm.

1 June:  Rev. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh – Guide to a thriving future : putting United Nations Sustainable Development Agreement to work for NZ

8 June:  Jessica Hutchings – Hua parakore: kaupapa Māori food sovereignty:  including soil health and composting.

15 June:  Sarah Adams, Cenna Lloyd – Urban agriculture: fruit trees & bees

22 June:  Fred Allen – Matariki celebration of rongoā Māori and native plant remedies

Puanga kai rau. Ka Hua ai ngā pua, koia ko Puanga. =
An abundance of food at Puanga, when the blossoms become fruit, that is Puanga.

orions-matariki

Matariki ahunga nui

More about each event:

Wed 1 June: Rev. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh
For the next 15 years, the United Nations will expand on its kaupapa of 17 major goals set out in a strategy which has been accepted by all nations, September 2015 and which is based on the Millennium Development goals (2000-2015) – find out more about this here: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/

In earlier talks at the Central Library, this year, we have heard of the need for clean water (goal 6) and life below water ( 14) but each one of the 17 goals covers an aspect of life at a basic community level – i.e. each one of these goals affects you, and me, in our every day living. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh, a committee member of UNANZ Wellington Branch, retired from a career as a biological sciences research professor to spend the last 20 years in the USA as a social engaged Zen Buddhist.  Rosalind is driven by her experiences, globally, to embrace these kaupapa as pivotal to growing and maintaining healthy local communities.

Matariki 8 June8 June: Jessica Hutchings
jessica-hutchingsHere is Jessica’s recent publication: Te mahi māra : hua parakore – a guide to Māori organic growing.  This book is an amazingly indepth guide to organic gardening, with chapters on a Māori World View, soil and composting, planting, harvesting, rongoā, beekeeping, hens and house cow, and even recipes for using your produce.   You will find an introductory profile here:  http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/sunday/audio/201782628/dr-jessica-hutchings, and here: http://www.foodconference.co.nz/14-15th-february-2015/conference-info/dr-jessica-hutchings/

“Dr. Jessica Hutchings, is from the tribe of Ngai Tahu and is also of Gujarati, India descent. Dr Hutchings is an academic, kaupapa Māori researcher and a Hua Parakore grower.   Dr. Hutchings is actively involved with Te Waka Kai Ora (the National Maori Organics Authority) as a grower; a lead researcher on a three-year research project to develop a tikanga based indigenous verification and validation system for food and agriculture – called Hua Parakore…” (Food Matters conference profile).

Matariki 15 June15 June:  Sarah Adams & Cenna Lloyd

Sarah Adams, Community & Neighbourhood Advisor and Urban Agriculture Advisor at WCC will describe the growing of fruit trees within our city boundaries: there is further information on the Council webpages here: wellington.govt.nz/services/environment-and-waste/environment/urban-agriculture.

Cenna Lloyd from Local Flavour Urban Honey Company will describe beekeeping tips for the city – here is one of the suburban bus stops (Khandallah) portraying the Bee Friendly city.

Bus-Stop-7th-day-front-content

You can see more beekeeping tips on wellington.govt.nz

Matariki 22 juneWed 22 June: Fred Allen
FredallenIn an expansion of his theme, Fred will present his thoughts on Rongoā Māori and native plant remedies within traditional and contemporary paradigms, and subsequent contemporary medicinal developments. Fred Allen is a Rongoā Māori practitioner, New Zealand native herbal medicinal product manufacturer and specialist New Zealand native plant horticulturist. Fred has participated in the NZ Health and Wellness Industry for over 30 years and has invested in development of personal specialist expertise in native flora, NZ biodiversity, ethno botany, phytochemistry and therapeutics of NZ endemic and indigenous herbal medicine.  He identifies and separates his work within both Māori and Western paradigms. He was invited by the South Korean Government to represent New Zealand at the World Traditional Medicine Expo during 2011.

Fred is of Te Atiawa descent, his rohe is Te Whanganui-a-Tara, and he is Managing Director of www.kiwiplants.co.nz and www.kiwiherbs.com.

Matariki

Wāhine, whakairo, whakaora reo.

Here are two beautifully illustrated volumes of art – one reveals an all-embracing Polynesian concept of atua with the underpinning spiritual world, the other describes the whakapapa of Ngāti Porou carvings.
On a different note – there’s a huge landscaping of the history of New Zealand women.

Language endangerment in the 21st century : globalisation, technology and new media : proceedings of the Conference FEL XVI, 12-15 September 2012, AUT University, Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand / editors Tania Kaʻai … [et al.]
Presenters include: Tania Kaʻai, Muiris Ó Laoire & Nicholas Ostler — Tīmoti Kāretu — Hinematau McNeill — Rachael Kaʻai-Mahuta — Hana O’Regan — Ruth Lysaght — Michael Walsh — John Moorfield — Peter Keegan, Catherine Watson, Jeanette King, Margaret Maclagan & Ray Harlow — Katerina Naitoro — Tania Kaʻai & Dean Mahuta — Elisa Duder — Paora Mato, Te Taka Keegan, Daniel Cunliffe, Tara Dalley — Lidu Gong — Paora Mato — Kevin Scannell.

He W’akaputanga Mai o te Rangatiratanga : a proclamation.
“This publication represents a culmination of material made available, or created for the Hokianga Maori artists group exhibition ; He Wakaputanga Mai o te Rangatiranga – A proclamation. The exhibition was organised and first presented by black space gallery in Kohukohu, February 1-28, 2014… [Includes] “educational information alongside works and thoughts of Hokianga Maori artists: Maureen Lander ; Toi Te Rito Maihi, Heiwari Johnson, claire Kaahu White, Michelle Morunga, Bev Wilson, Urikore Ngakuru, Heather Randerson, Henare Rawiri, Emere Te Paea Robson, John Morunga, Stacey Noel, Maki Herbert.”

Syndetics book coverA history of New Zealand women / Barbara Brookes.
“This major new history of New Zealand ¿ written from the perspective of the women who have lived here ¿ will be released on Monday 15 February, launching at a conference held in honour of the author (leading New Zealand historian Barbara Brookes) at Otago University.” (Syndetics summary)
Incomplete contents: Origins, traditions and ‘civilisation’ before, 1814 — A civilising mission, 1814-1856 — Settling pākehā families unsettling whānau, 1850s-1860s — War, gold and dispossession, 1860s-1880s — The quest for citizenship, 1885-1890s — New expectations for a new century, 1900-1919 — Motherhood, mortality and a voice for women in the interwar years, 1919-1940 — The ‘modern woman’ of the interwar years, 1919-1940 — On the home front, 1939-1951 — Suburbia, 1950s-1960s — Decade of discovery, 1967-1977 — Into the corridors of power, 1977-1986 — Reckoning with women, 1984-1990s — Shaping the new millennium, 2000-2015.

Syndetics book coverAtua : sacred gods from Polynesia / Michael Gunn.The Polynesian concept of atua — of gods, figurative objects and associated beliefs — developed over thousands of years and spread throughout the region… Across central and eastern Polynesia, from the Cook, Austral, Society and Marquesas islands, the Tuamotu Archipelago, Tahiti, Rapa Nui, the Hawaiian Islands and Aotearoa New Zealand, unique, yet coherent, societies developed. With that a complex and sustaining spiritual world came into being… Among the atua were the deified spirits of human ancestors, particularly those famous for their invincibility, political strength or navigation skill. Polynesians created, revered and communicated with their atua in a relationship of profound intimacy. This way of life suffered a violent rupture with the arrival of Christianity in the 18th century…. ” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverA whakapapa of tradition : 100 years of Ngāti Porou carving, 1830-1930 / Ngarino Ellis ; with new photography by Natalie Robertson.
“From the emergence of the chapel and the wharenui in the nineteenth century to the rejuvenation of carving by Apirana Ngata in the 1920s, Maori carving went through a rapid evolution from 1830 to 1930. Focusing on thirty meeting houses, Ngarino Ellis tells the story of Ngati Porou carving and a profound transformation in Maori art. Beginning around 1830, three previously dominant art traditions – waka taua (war canoes), pataka (decorated storehouses) and whare rangatira (chief’s houses) – declined and were replaced by whare karakia (churches), whare whakairo (decorated meeting houses) and wharekai (dining halls)… Iwirakau is credited for reinvigorating the art of carving in the Waiapu region. The six major carvers of his school went on to create more than thirty important meeting houses and other structures. During this transformational period, carvers and patrons re-negotiated key concepts such as tikanga (tradition), tapu (sacredness) and mana (power, authority) – embedding them within the new architectural forms whilst preserving rituals surrounding the creation and use of buildings… This book is both a major study of Ngati Porou carving and an attempt to make sense of Maori art history. ” (Syndetics summary)

Te matau a Māui : fishhooks, fishing and fisheries in New Zealand / Chris Paulin with Mark Fenwick.
“”Te Matau a Maui discusses the form and function of the traditional Maori fishhook, customary fishing, and development of commercial fishing in New Zealand since European settlement (including the adoption of the rotating hook design as a re-discovery of the innovative and highly effective Maori hook design by present day commercial long-line fisheries), and changes in Maori lifestyle associated with the increasing availability of European agricultural cultivars and domestic animals in the nineteenth century, and urbanisation in the twentieth century that led to a decline in Maori fishing activity and the loss of indigenous knowledge”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Toitū te whenua

There’s a diversity of kaupapa in this handful of books – organic gardening, pacifism of Parihaka, an outline of Māori participation in privatised military industry, stories from Tuhoe kaumatua and kuia, and a collection of research essays and thoughts on the home.

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“”Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on”–Back cover.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Whiti o Rongomai and the resistance of Parihaka / Danny Keenan.
“This is an account of the life and times of Te Whiti o Rongomai set against the politics and Crown policies of the nineteenth century. It traces the forces that shaped his life’s journey from Ngāmotu, where he was born, to his settling at Parihaka and his evolving sense of the injustices and disempowerment Māori experienced and his response to these. The book discusses the struggles Te Whiti had, as understood by some of his living relatives, against native policy of the time, and it gives insights into the motivations of Te Whiti and his actions. It explores the community at Parihaka, its resistance and the consequences of this and looks at Māori and government actions and responses up to the present day”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverA hidden economy : Māori in the privatised military industry / Maria Bargh.
“The Maori economy is often defined simply by the contributions of Maori in New Zealand in the areas of farming, fisheries and forestry. This book explores the ways that Maori in the privatised military industry contribute in monetary and non-monetary ways to the Maori economy. Workers in the privatised military industry very rarely, if ever, give interviews about their work or details about their pay. However, this book includes five interviews with Maori who have worked or are still working in the privatised military industry and explores how they articulate themselves as Maori in the industry, giving a glimpse at this secret world and how Maori operate in it.” (Syndetics summary)

Te ahi kaaroa : Rūātoki kaumātua narratives / Te Manatū Mātauranga o Tūhoe.
“”The Tuhoe Education Authority Te Manatu Matauranga o Tuhoe interviewed kuia and kaumatua in te reo Maori about their lives and experiences”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Ngā kaikōrero: George Thrupp, Rangipuke Tari, Tiwi Black, Patu Hale, Maureen Biddle, Kataraina Te Moana.

Syndetics book coverHome : here to stay / edited by Mere Kēpa, Marilyn McPherson and Linitā Manuʻatu.
“This is a collection of twelve academic essays that consider understandings of home and the impact of dominant societies on indigenous societies and their homes. The book covers home and language preservation, homelessness, retention of land, tobacco use in the home, loss of home through trauma and natural disaster, ageing and health, and the meaning of home. This is the third book in the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Edited Collections series.”–Publisher information.

Crimson / Marino Blank.

Syndetics book coverA Māori reference grammar / Ray Harlow.
“Based on a third-year university course Ray Harlow taught for a number of years, this grammar reference book is intended for people whose knowledge of Māori is at that level or higher – advanced learners, native speakers and teachers of Māori. The book provides explanations and examples of all the important sentence types of modern Māori. It guides readers progressively from the simple to the more complicated, starting with words and particles, proceeding through simple clauses and sentences to transformations of these and to complex sentences with elaborate internal structure”–Publisher information.