Like Studio Ghibli? Try these comics!

The beloved Japanese animation institution Studio Ghibli, creator of such films as Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke and Kiki’s Delivery Service, has captured people’s imaginations for over twenty years. Their films explore themes of identity, family, social duty, culture and nature, through gorgeously rendered fantasy worlds, emotional coming-of-age stories, and meetings of the fantastic with the mundane. There’s a Studio Ghibli film for everyone, and if you’re a fan of their work, we think you’d like these comic recommendations from our Graphic Novel collection.


The Sandman : the dream hunters / Gaiman, Neil
“Neil Gaiman’s transcendent series SANDMAN is often hailed as the definitive Vertigo title and one of the finest achievements in graphic storytelling. Gaiman created an unforgettable tale of the forces that exist beyond life and death by weaving ancient mythology and folklore with his own distinct narrative vision. Adapted by P. Craig Russell from the multi-award winning novella, The King of All Night’s Dreaming is drawn into a tale about a monk, a fox woman, and an evil man set in ancient Japan.” (Catalogue)

The Spire / Spurrier, Simon
“The Spire is a mountain of metal and stone, a vast city that rises out of the middle of the radioactive desert. Filled with twisting tunnels, grinding elevators, and ancient machinery, it is home to over a million human and non-human residents. Shå, the last of the species known as the Medusi, is responsible for keeping the hodgepodge of forgotten technology and new biology safe as Commander of the City Watch. But when a string of grisly murders are committed just as a new Baroness of the Spire is about to be sworn in, Shå will have to find the killer and bring that individual to justice.” (Catalogue)

My brother’s husband. Volume 1 / Tagame, Gengoroh
“Yaichi is a work-at-home suburban dad in contemporary Tokyo; formerly married to Natsuki, father to their young daughter, Kana. Their lives suddenly change with the arrival at their doorstep of a hulking, affable Canadian named Mike Flanagan, who declares himself the widower of Yaichi’s estranged gay twin, Ryoji.  What follows is an unprecedented and heartbreaking look at the state of a largely still-closeted Japanese gay culture: how it’s been affected by the West, and how the next generation can change the preconceptions about it and prejudices against it.” (Catalogue)

Wayward. Volume one, String theory / Zubkavich, Jim
“Rori Lane is trying to start a new life when she reunites with her mother in Japan, but ancient creatures lurking in the shadows of Tokyo sense something hidden deep within her, threatening everything she holds dear. Can Rori unlock the secrets of her power before it’s too late? An all-new Image supernatural spectacle that combines the camaraderie and emotion of Buffy with the action and mystery of Hellboy.” (Catalogue)

Daytripper / Moon, Fábio
DAYTRIPPER follows the life of one man, Bras de Olivias Dominguez. Every chapter features an important period in Bras’ life in exotic Brazil, and each story ends the same way: with his death. The following story starts up at a different point in his life, oblivious to his death in the previous issue – and then also ends with him dying again. In every chapter, Bras dies at different moments in his life, as the story follows him through his entire existence – one filled with possibilities of happiness and sorrow, good and bad, love and loneliness” (Catalogue)

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