Infographics to understand global economy: new non-fiction books

From amazing infographics to help you understand global economy; through how to save the planet we live on; to ideas to thrive in retirement, our new non-fiction books will have something for everyone.

The global economy as you’ve never seen it / Ramge, Thomas
“An ingeniously conceived tour of the global economy and all its key components, deconstructed piece by piece in 99 illuminating, full-color infographics.” (adapted from Catalogue)

The uninhabitable earth : life after warming / Wallace-Wells, David
“Without a revolution in how we approach climate change and adjustments to how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth will likely become close to uninhabitable and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century. The Uninhabitable Earth is both a synthesis of the latest science and an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Around the world in 80 words : a journey through the English language / Jones, Paul Anthony
“In this captivating round-the-world jaunt, Paul Anthony Jones reveals the intriguing tales behind how 80 different places came to be immortalised in our language. Beautifully designed, consistently entertaining and ideal for dipping into, Around the World in 80 Words is the perfect gift: a whimsical voyage through the far-flung reaches of the English language.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Not fade away : how to thrive in retirement / Dodd, Celia
“Retirement is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be yourself and do what you want to do. It offers new possibilities for personal growth through learning, retraining, travelling and friendship. But it is also one of the biggest transitions we face, and brings huge psychological and emotional challenges. Not Fade Away inspires you to make up your own mind and take control of your future. And that, experts agree, is the key to a good retirement.” (adapted from Catalogue)

AI superpowers : China, Silicon Valley, and the new world order / Lee, Kai-Fu
“As Sino-American competition in AI heats up, Lee envisions China and the US forming a powerful duopoly in AI. He outlines the upheaval of traditional jobs, how the suddenly unemployed will find new ways of making their lives meaningful, and how the Chinese and American governments will have to cope with the changing economic landscape.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Unquiet women : stories from the dusk of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the Enlightenment / Adams, Max
“In this exploration of the lives of women living between the last days of Rome and the Enlightenment, Max Adams triumphantly overturns the idea that women of this period were either queens, nuns or invisible. A kaleidoscopic study of women’s creativity, intellect and influence, Unquiet Women brings to life the experiences of women whose stories are all too rarely told.” (adapted from Catalogue)

The future is Asian : commerce, conflict, and culture in the 21st century / Khanna, Parag
“In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being Asianized. The “Asian Century” is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, Russia to Australia, Turkey to Indonesia–linking five billion people through trade, finance, infrastructure, and diplomatic networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Kafka’s last trial : the case of a literary legacy / Balint, Benjamin
“The story of the international struggle to preserve Kafka’s literary legacy. Kafka’s Last Trial begins with Kafka’s last instruction to his closest friend, Max Brod: to destroy all his remaining papers upon his death. But when the moment arrived in 1924, Brod could not bring himself to burn the unpublished works of the man he considered a literary genius–even a saint. Instead, Brod devoted his life to championing Kafka’s writing, rescuing his legacy from obscurity and physical destruction.” (adapted from Catalogue)

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