Te Kō Para Para book cover

Whāia te mātauranga – Seek knowledge: New books

Whāia te mātauranga hei oranga mō koutou; Seek after wisdom for the sake of your well-being. This wonderful whakataukī reflects the importance of learning, so if you are seeking to increase your knowledge of Te Ao Māori check out the fascinating Te Kōparapara: An Introduction to the Māori World which leads this eclectic list of new additions to our Māori collection  – your mind and well-being will benefit!

Syndetics book coverTe Kōparapara: An Introduction to the Māori World
“Like the clear morning song of te kōparapara, the bellbird, this book allows the Māori world to speak for itself through an accessible introduction to Māori culture, history, and society from an indigenous perspective. In 21 illustrated chapters, leading scholars introduce Māori culture, Māori history, and Māori society today (including 21st century issues like education, health, political economy, and identity).” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWāhiao: the people of Whakarewarewa / Dr Marian Maré and Dr Aloma Parker.
“This book traces the history of the Wāhiao people, weaving oral and recorded history to illustrate their relationship with the thermal valley of Te Whakarewarewatanga-o-te-ope-taua-a-Wāhiao.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke tangata: Māori in Markets and Cities / Brian Easton for Te Whānau o Waiparera.
“Heke Tangata can broadly be translated as ‘migration of the people’, and in this book economist Brian Easton tracks the major relocations Māori have made into the cities and market economy since 1945. The picture that emerges is stark: Māori remain a generation behind Pākehā in economic well-being. Commissioned by Te Whānau o Waipareira, this is a concise, clear overview for policy discussion and general understanding of Māori economic participation in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand.” (Adapted from the publisher’s website)

Māori healing remedies: Rongoā Māori / Murdoch Riley; photos by Phil Bendle.
“A useful book of time-tested Māori herbal therapies. By quoting the words of practitioners of herbal medicine, and by describing some of the practices and karakia associated, this book becomes a compendium of therapies for arthritis, insect bites, skin complaints, sprains, etc. With photographs that identify many indigenous plants used by Māori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTwo voyages: the first meeting of Māori and Europeans, and the journeys that led to it / by David Horry.
“This book follows two voyages; that of Abel Tasman in the Heemskerck and Zeehaen, and the Polynesians in the waka Kurahaupō. It describes the journeys to their dramatic point of coincidence in Golden Bay.” (Back cover)

Te reo o ngā toi: A Māori language dictionary of the arts.
This excellent Māori language dictionary of the arts will be an invaluable aid to teachers working in bilingual and Te Reo Māori immersion schools and settings, or those wanting to increase their vocabulary of the arts world. It includes a traditional Māori-English, English-Māori dictionary at its beginning and then moves into more detailed explanations, examples and photographs. From music to art to woodwork you can find all the language you need in this helpful and well designed book published by Te Tāhuhu o Te Mātauranga/the Ministry of Education and He Kupenga Hao I Te Reo.

Tirohanga whānui: Views from the past: an exhibition of paintings from the Fletcher Trust Collection / Peter Shaw.
Tirohanga Whānui is the companion piece to the 2017 exhibition of paintings from the Fletcher Trust Collection held at Te Kōngahu Museum of Waitangi in Northland. Notes on the paintings were written by the Trust’s art curator, Peter Shaw, and notable works include the early nineteenth century painting attributed to John Jackson of Ngā Puhi chiefs Hongi and Waikato, and a drawing from 1826 of Māori weapons, implements and utensils by French engraver Ambroise Tardieu. Beautiful reproductions provide a unique insight into the history of Te Tai Tokerau and Aotearoa.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *