Image from amazon.co.uk

New vinyl featuring NZ artists and more

New vinyl features fantastic new releases by Kiwi artists; Hex and Marlon Williams. Our vinyl collection keeps getting bigger and better. Come and have a look.

Hex – The hill temple
“HEX is the progeny of wives Kiki and GG Van Newtown, a musical love affair who draw on influences spanning classical to folkto punk to metal. Together with Jason Erskine they align quick, incisive lyrics and rock opera levels of riffage to reflect the chaos approaching post-capitalism with fury and laughter.” (adapted from realgroovy.co.nz)

Marlon Williams – Make way for love
“Known for his effortlessly distinctive voice, Make Way For Love marks Marlon’s exponential growth as a songwriter. Throughout 11 original songs, he explores new musical terrain and reveals himself in an unprecedented way in the wake of a fractured relationship. While Make Way For Love draws on Marlon’s own story, it captures the vagaries of relationships we’ve all been through: the bliss, ache, uncertainty, and bitterness.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)

Rolling Stones – On air
“A collection of rarely heard radio recordings from their formative years. The songs, including eight the band have never recorded or released commercially, were originally broadcast on bygone UK BBC shows such as Saturday Club, Top Gear, Rhythm and Blues and The Joe Loss Pop Show between 1963 and 1965.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)

Nick Cave – Abattoir blues ; The lyre of Orpheus
“This masterful double album was produced by Nick Launay at Studio Ferber in Paris in March–April 2004 with Cave splitting drumming duties for the two parts, with Jim Sclavunos on ‘Abattoir Blues’ and Thomas Wydler on ‘Lyre Of Orpheus’. The entire album was completed in twelve days, and notably, the last track on the album, ‘O Children’, was featured in the 2010 film Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows Part One. The song is also referenced as an achievement in Lego Harry Potter: Years 5-7!” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)

Belle and Sebastian – How to solve our human problems
“Taken as a whole piece, though, the striking thing about How to Solve Our Human Problems is neither the finely honed sense of craft — evident in both the compositions and sharp production — nor how the group now excels in churning out a disco epic like the six-minute ‘Sweet Dew Lee.’ Rather, it’s how Belle and Sebastian have completely devoted themselves to joy, squeezing out any remnants of melancholy that may have lingered in their music.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz)

Penguin Cafe Orchestra – The imperfect sea
“The album title refers to a saying by his father that ”we wade in a sea of imperfections,” reflecting upon the idea that beauty can be found amongst the chaos. ”If there is a narrative to the album it’s coming to the acceptance of the imperfections in all aspects of life; moreover, the recognition that these imperfections and tiny randomnesses are in fact what make up the best parts,” Arthur explains. Predominantly self-composed, the new album also features covers of electronic works by Simian Mobile Disco and Kraftwerk, along with a re-working of Simon’s ‘Now Nothing’.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)