Classical CD additions

This week, on receiving the album The Cello in Wartime, we were very interested to read about trench cellos (and pianos, and other such) – instruments stored and played by soldiers in the trenches – and sometimes fashioned by them from found materials. You can hear and see an example here. In other new selections, we have Classical and post-Romantic heavyweights to enjoy.

The Cello in Wartime. Performed by Steven Isserlis and Connie Shih.
Performed on the ‘Marquis de Corberon’ Stradivarius, and a trench cello, W.E. Hill and Sons, c. 1900. “War has an infinite, and frequently polarised, variety of effects on composers. Some feel impelled to depict its horrors in their music; some, on the contrary, escape into an idyllic world in order to block out the events surrounding them… No surprise, then, that the pieces on this disc explore and inhabit such a breadth of emotions, languages and atmospheres” (insert).

Piano Concertos 25 & 27, Mozart. Performed by Piotr Anderszewski with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe.
“…Mozart is the composer of ambiguity par excellence – the most luminous moments can be interwoven with such darkness. Where is the light, where is the shadow? Sometimes, I don’t really know. And yet this is music of such evident limpidity. It is a miracle” (Piotr Anderszewski, cover).

Chant Funèbre, Le Sacre du Printemps, Stravinsky. Performed by the Lucerne Festival Orchestra.
A compilation of early Stravinsky works (opus numbers in single digits), plus the Rite of Spring. This is the world premiere recording of the previously lost Chant Funèbre. “A dazzling programme of Stravinsky. A new era has well and truly begun for the Lucerne Festival Orchestra” (The Times, reproduced on the back cover).