More New Classical Additions

This week in new classical music we highlight a big German post-romantic symphony, a piece of minimalist piano music presided over by a virtuoso pianist, and a compilation of works by a less-well-known German composer of songs.

Symphony No. 5, Mahler. Performed by the Minnesota Orchestra with Osmo Vänskä.
“Composed in 1902, [this] purely instrumental work followed upon three symphonies that had all included vocal parts. This and the opening trumpet motif, an allusion to the rhythm that begins Beethoven’s Fifth have been interpreted as Mahler’s return to a more conventional idea of the symphonic genre. Other features are less traditional, however a sometimes bewildering mixture of musical idioms reminds us of the melting-pot that Vienna was at the time, with allusions to Austrian, Bohemian and Hungarian styles. To an unsuspecting audience, the famous Adagietto for strings and harp probably the best-known of all of Mahler’s music must also have been surprising, appearing at the heart of a work which is otherwise lavishly scored and orchestrated.” (amazon.com)

For Bunita Marcus, Morton Feldman. Performed by Marc-André Hamelin.
“‘I have no problem with notes… none at all’, was Feldman’s cryptic comment on For Bunita Marcus. Throughout the seventy-two-minute duration of this extraordinary work, notes coalesce into wisps of melody which drift softly in and out of an immense silence. You are indeed, as pianist Marc-André Hamelin writes in the booklet notes, ‘about to enter a world unlike any other.'” (amazon.com)

Songs, by Robert Franz. Performed by Robin Tritschler.
“Highly regarded by such contemporaries as Mendelssohn, Schumann and Liszt, Robert Franz wrote 279 songs over the course of a long life. For this recital, Graham Johnson and tenor Robin Tritschler perform a selection of 47 of their favorites.” (amazon.com)

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