Out of sync – New Health books in August

Most of us can describe ourselves as out of sync in one way or another, at some point in our lives, be it through chronic illness, allergies, depression, anxiety, alzheimer’s or autism (the list is not exhaustive). There may not be a miracle cure but we can all learn how to become “ordinarily well”. Here are some guides:

Syndetics book coverYoung, sick, and invisible : a skeptic’s journey with chronic illness
“Drawing on her own deeply personal experiences, Ania Bula explores what it is like to live with unseen chronic disabilities. She paints a vibrant picture of what it is like to be diagnosed with two life-long debilitating conditions as a young adult and relates the challenges and frustrations of dealing with predatory alternative medicine practitioners, arrogant doctors, indifferent bureaucracies, and well-meaning friends and family who always seem to say either the wrong thing–or nothing at all. With honesty and humor, she shares her journey of pain, suffering, and, ultimately, coping, both to help others gain some understanding about what it is like to live with chronic illness.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverEat complete : the 21 nutrients that fuel brainpower, boost weight loss, and transform your health
“From psychiatrist and author of Fifty Shades of Kale comes a collection of 100 simple, delicious, and affordable recipes to help you get the core nutrients your brain and body need to stay happy and healthy. Your brain burns more of the food you eat than any other organ. It determines if you gain or lose weight, if you’re feeling energetic or fatigued, if you’re upbeat or depressed. In this essential guide and cookbook, Drew Ramsey, explores the role the human brain plays in every part of your life, including mood, health, focus, memory, and appetite, and reveals what foods you need to eat to keep your brain properly fueled.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverGluten exposed : the science behind the hype and how to navigate to a healthy, symptom-free life
“Green and Jones, authors of Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic, cut through the misinformation, false claims, and widespread confusion over gluten. They examine the connections between the gut, brain, and what you ingest (not just gluten) to reveal what’s really going on in your body and your brain. While the diet is a lifesaver for those with celiac disease, for others it may injure health, rob the body of essential nutrients, and mask real problems. Gluten Exposed offers clear, welcome guidance and a practical road map that can help anyone achieve a healthier, symptom-free life.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverWhen someone you know has depression : words to say and things to do
“In When Someone You Know Has Depression, Dr. Susan Noonan draws on first-hand experience of the illness and evidence-based medical information. As a physician she has treated, supported, and educated those living with-and those caring for-a person who has a mood disorder. She also has lived through the depths of her own mood disorder. This compassionate book offers specific suggestions for what to say, how to encourage, and how to act around a loved one-as well as when to back off.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverThe out-of-sync child grows up : coping with sensory processing disorder in the adolescent and young adult years 
The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up will be the new bible for the vast audience of parents whose children, already diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder, are entering the adolescent, tween, and teen years, as well as those who do not yet have a diagnosis and are struggling to meet the challenges of daily life. This book offers practical advice on living with SPD, covering everyday challenges as well as the social and emotional issues that many young people with SPD face. Carol Kranowitz’s insights are supplemented by first-person accounts of adolescents and teens with SPD, sharing their experiences and hard-won lessons with readers.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverOrdinarily well : the case for antidepressants
“In Ordinarily Well, the celebrated psychiatrist and author Peter D. Kramer examines the growing controversy about antidepressants. A practicing doctor who trained as a psychotherapist and worked with pioneers in psychopharmacology, Kramer combines moving accounts of his patients’ dilemmas with an eye-opening history of drug research to cast antidepressants in a new light. Crucially, he shows how antidepressants act in practice: less often as miracle cures than as useful, and welcome, tools for helping troubled people achieve an underrated goal–becoming ordinarily well.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverWhen someone you love has dementia
“Worldwide, there are more than 44 million people with dementia today, the vast majority of whom are looked after by unpaid carers. Figures of those affected are predicted to rise to 135 million by 2050. This new edition considers practical and emotional issues of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverWhen Fraser met Billy
“Fraser was a two-year-old autistic child with a multitude of problems when he first met Billy at the cat protection shelter. Billy purred, laid his paws across Fraser and they have been inseparable ever since. Slowly but surely Billy has transformed Fraser’s life.  Fraser’s mother Louise has watched her son move from being a child prone to anxiety, tantrums and sudden emotional meltdowns to now a much calmer, less moody four-year-old whose future looks a lot brighter. Their profound bond has immeasurably improved their lives and the family’s. Like A Street Cat Named Bob, this story will touch the hearts of all.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverCheer up love : adventures in depresssion with the crab of hate
“The reaction to stand up  comedian Susan Calman’s BBC Radio4 show about mental health was so positive that she wanted to expand on it and write a more detailed account of surviving when you’re the world’s most negative person. The Crab of Hate is the personification of Calman’s depression and her version of the notorious Black Dog. This is a very personal memoir of how, after many years and with a lot of help and talking, she has embraced her dark side and realised that she can be the most joyous sad person you’ll ever meet.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverEat to cheat dementia : what you eat helps you avoid it or live better with it
“As we live longer it’s essential we understand how best to maintain both body and brain so they can help us achieve all we wish for in life. This book is a companion to Ngaire’s ground-breaking book “Eat To Cheat Ageing”. It addresses the complexities of neuroscience and how what we eat can help or hinder our brains, whether you are in your 30s, 40s or 50s and looking ahead to your later years, currently in your 60s or beyond, wishing to make the most of life; whether you live with a dementia diagnosis or not, or care about someone who does.” (Syndetics)