Managing illness – New Health books in September

This month, we learn new ways to manage illness and take a new approaches towards conditions such as autism and explore the world of neuroscience. We also find advice and support to deal with the sometimes difficult path towards fertility.

Syndetics book coverIt’s all in your head : true stories of imaginary illness
“‘Even if medical tests cannot explain your pain or tiredness or disability, it does not lessen your suffering.  As many as a third of men and women visiting their GP have symptoms that are medically unexplained. In most, an emotional root is suspected and yet, when it comes to a diagnosis, this is the very last thing we want to hear, and the last thing doctors want to say. In It’s All in Your Head consultant neurologist Dr Suzanne O’Sullivan takes us on a journey through the very real world of psychosomatic illness. She takes us from the extreme — from paralysis, seizures and blindness — to more everyday problems such as tiredness and pain. Meeting her patients, she encourages us to look deep inside the human condition. There we find the secrets we are all capable of keeping from ourselves, and our age-old failure to credit the intimate and extraordinary connection between mind and body.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverGet a life : his & hers survival guide to IVF
Get A Life is the perfect down-to-earth guide for anyone thinking of embarking on fertility treatment. It’s two books in one, a book of advice for women and a survival guide for men, each chapter mirrored but with very different experience and advice. IVF is terrifying, awful and extraordinary in equal measures for both partners. Get A Life shares Richard and Rosie’s ride on the fertility rollercoaster, bringing you the funny, emotional, and physical sides of IVF. It is an invaluable guide from both perspectives on how to get through the process in one piece.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverMayo Clinic guide to fertility and conception
“A comprehensive resource for couples wanting to conceive includes advice on diet and exercise to promote fertility, answers to questions about age and stress, and information on when to see a fertility specialist.”(Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverThe essential guide to women’s herbal medicine
“Botanical medicine is one of the main therapies employed by naturopathic doctors, and many women are now turning to natural remedies for treating and preventing health problems, either as an alternative or as a complement to conventional health care. This pursuit of optimum health care can often be confusing and overwhelming because of the wide range of information that is available. Gilbert provides clear information on herbal medicine treatments that meet the distinctive needs of women. There are 25 topics covered, from anemia and Dysmenorrhea to pregnancy, menopause and endometriosis. A complete profile for 49 herbs is featured with the corresponding condition or ailment it treats along with an easy-to-follow protocol.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverThe complete thyroid health & diet guide : understanding and managing thyroid disease
“One of every eight women has a thyroid disorder, an incidence five to eight times higher than men. The thyroid produces the “master hormone” that controls everything in the body. One of the biggest reasons the thyroid slows down is because of iodine deficiency and aging. The wide-spread use of medications delivers poor outcomes. Many patients with thyroid disorders are desperate for help, looking for alternatives to conventional medicine. This book provides a thorough understanding of why the thyroid may be out of balance and what to do about it. including nutritional strategies to help the healthy thyroid.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverDragon’s blood & willow bark : the mysteries of medieval medicine
“Calling to mind a time when butchers and executioners knew more about anatomy than university-trained physicians, the phrase ‘Medieval Medicine’ conjures up horrors for us with our modern ideas on hygiene, instant pain relief and effective treatments. Although no one could allay the dread of plague, the medical profession provided cosmetic procedures, women’s sanitary products, dietary advice and horoscopes predicting the sex of unborn babies or the best day to begin a journey. In her new book, popular historian Toni Mount guides the reader through this labyrinth of strange ideas and such unlikely remedies as leeches, meadowsweet, roasted cat and red bed curtains – some of which modern medicine is now coming to value – but without the nasty smells or any threat to personal wellbeing and safety.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverThe man who wasn’t there : investigations into the strange new science of the self
“In the tradition of Oliver Sacks, Anil Ananthaswamy’s extensive in-depth interviews venture into the lives of individuals who offer perspectives that will change how you think about who you are.  Neuroscience has identified specific regions of the brain that, when they misfire, can cause the self to move back and forth between the body and a doppelganger, or to leave the body entirely. So where in the brain, or mind, or body, is the self actually located? As Ananthaswamy elegantly reports, neuroscientists themselves now see that the elusive sense of self is both everywhere and nowhere in the human brain.”(Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverTotal recovery : solving the mystery of chronic pain and depression
“Drawing on dramatic patient stories and cutting-edge research, the book reveals that chronic physical and emotional pain are two sides of the same coin. New discoveries show that disease is not the result of a single event but an accumulation of traumas. Every injury, every infection, every toxin, and every emotional blow generates the same reaction: inflammation, activated by tiny cells in the brain, called microglia. Turned on too often from too many assaults, it can have a devastating cumulative effect. Dr. Kaplan’s unified theory of chronic pain and depression helps us understand not only the cause of these conditions but also the issues we must address to create a pathway to healing.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverUniquely human : a different way of seeing autism
“In Uniquely Human, Dr. Prizant suggests a major shift in understanding autism: Instead of classifying “autistic” behaviors as signs of pathology, he sees them as part of a range of strategies to cope with a world that feels chaotic and overwhelming. Rather than curb these behaviors, it’s better to enhance abilities, build on strengths, and offer supports that will naturally lead to more desirable behavior and a better quality of life. Filled with humanity and wisdom, Uniquely Human offers a compassionate and insightful perspective that parents, professionals, and family members will find uplifting and hopeful.” (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverBrainstorm : a memoir of love, devotion, and a cerebral aneurysm
“Brainstorm is the candid and powerful memoir of the author’s harrowing experience of an aneurysm and his road to recovery. It is a journey of love, devotion, and a clash of medical beliefs and countercultures. The fierce resolve of the author and his wife is extraordinary, inspiring, and matched only by the tremendous competence and care of the medical system–one to which the author initially stands in opposition, but that he later learns to admire and respect. This book is for anyone who has experienced the fear and difficulties of a major illness. Filled with raw emotion, Brainstorm affords quiet but powerful support to those suffering similar circumstances and strives to tell them that they are not alone.” (Syndetics)