What’s new in our NZ Collection

This month the New Zealand Collection features “Mad on Radium” about New Zealand’s engagement with the nuclear world from the start when Lord Rutherford first split the atom. In “Selling the Dream” early N.Z. tourism promotion posters and publicity is explored while “Made in NZ” looks at some of this country’s high achievers. There is also Martin Sneddon’s review of the rugby world cup, a Graig Potton photographic collection, Albert Wendt’s latest and Gareth Morgan’s take on issues facing our far south oceans.

Syndetics book coverSelling the dream : the art of early New Zealand tourism / Peter Alsop, Gary Stewart and Dave Bamford ; foreword by Fran Walsh.
Celebrates the remarkable range of tourism posters and other publicity that helped promote New Zealand – both locally and to the world – until the 1960s, before television and colour photography changed the publicity landscape forever. This imagery is some of the finest graphic art ever produced in New Zealand, and as arresting and impressive today as when it was first created. The art of early tourism was highly significant in New Zealand’s art history, and in the development of New Zealand’s tourism industry and sense of national identity. (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand / Craig Potton ; [photography, Craig Potton ; introduction, John B. Turner ; poem, Brian Turner].
“Craig Potton rose to prominence as a photographer in the late 1980s, with a distinct and original view of the landscape of Aotearoa/New Zealand. He was a photographer with little interest in a sentimentalised or romantic view of the land, but rather pursued a less compromising and more muscular vision that sought to convey this country’s remarkable landscape in a real light. This book collects together many of his most celebrated images in one place, a body of work that clearly shows why his reputation is so strong.”–Publisher’s description.

Syndetics book coverMade in NZ / Chris Mirams & Ross Land.
“Made in New Zealand is a gorgeous coffee table book which celebrates the ways in which being a New Zealander have shaped some of our most inspirational achievers. Forty successful Kiwis share their perspective on how this country has influenced them and contributed to their success. These captivating stories are accompanied by stunning portrait photography. Award-winning New Zealand photographer Ross Land and award-winning journalist Chris Mirams have approached the full gamut of our society and the book features everyone from Alison Holst to David Kirk; from Professor Margaret Brimble to Jon Toogood and John Minto to Sir Graham Henry”–publisher website.

Syndetics book coverFrom Mānoa to a Ponsonby garden / Albert Wendt.
“In Hawaiʻi Wendt watches the changing shadows of the Koʻolau mountains from his verandah; considers the nature of mauli, the seat of life; walks protected in his partner’s perfumed slipstream to work; and writes to fellow poet Hone Tuwhare from the excesses of Las Vegas. In the second half of the book we move to the garden in Ponsonby in 40 ‘garden’ poems. Includes some of Wendt’s inky, drawn poems about the Sāmoan tsunami or galu afi. A book about ageing and the consideration of death”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverA stadium of 4 million / Martin Snedden. The story of New Zealand’s greatest sporting event – and, ultimately – one of its greatest triumphs. Martin Snedden was Rugby World Cup 2011 chief executive and the man tasked with delivering a successful tournament to the IRB and the people of New Zealand. To say that he achieved his goal – including making budget in one of this country’s most difficult years where the devastating effects of the Christchurch earthquake reverberated around the country for months – would be an understatement. RWC 2011 will go down as not only as the ‘best ever’ Cup but, far more importantly, as one of New Zealand’s greatest achievements. One powerful component of this achievement is that the famous All Blacks, in a most dramatic fashion, finally got that damn RWC monkey off their backs and won a trophy. But the much more compelling aspect of this achievement is that, both within and away from that rugby field of dreams , the people of New Zealand united in a way they may never have done before outside of wartime; they put aside the sadness of the previous 12 months and genuinely brought to life their stadium of four million, to provide a wonderful welcome and enduring memories for their 133,000 international RWC visitors. (Syndetics)

Syndetics book coverIce, mice and men : the issues facing our far south / Geoff Simmons and Gareth Morgan with John McCrystal.
Our far south is packed with history and wildlife, and is renowned for its breathtaking and photogenic beauty. But does our appreciation of the region run more than skin deep? Do Kiwis really understand how important the region is and what issues are facing it? In February 2012, Gareth Morgan trapped ten of New Zealand’s top experts on the region in a boat with 40 ordinary Kiwis for a month. Together with Geoff Simmons, he grilled them about the issues facing the region and this book is the result. What they found was startling. Our Far South – that part of New Zealand that extends from Stewart Island almost without interruption to the South Pole – harbours precious wildlife and is the engine room of the world’s oceans and climate. We are blessed to live in this unique part of the world, but we also have a huge responsibility to look after it. This book looks at the three ways we risk inflicting long-term, even permanent harm, on this precious and fragile region. The race to exploit resources has been underway for three centuries, and may be poised to escalate. Pressure from human activity may be threatening biodiversity and even the survival of species. And looming ever larger is the threat of climate change. Damage done to our far south will have profound implications, both for New Zealand and right across the globe.–Cover.

Syndetics book coverMad on radium : New Zealand in the atomic age / Rebecca Priestley.
Although New Zealander Lord Rutherford was the first to split the atom, the country has since been known around the world for its nuclear-free stance. In this engaging and accessible book, an alternative history is revealed of “nuclear New Zealand”—when there was much enthusiasm for nuclear science and technology. From the first users of x-rays and radium in medicine to the plans for a nuclear power station on the Kaipara Harbour, this accountnbsp;uncovers the long and rich history of New Zealanders’ engagement with the nuclear world and the roots of its nuclear-free identity. (Syndetics)